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propagating by hardwood cuttings in winter

 
Posts: 79
Location: Iron River MI
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Today I took some cuttings of grape vine and two different roses to try to get to take root for planting next spring. This is my first time doing anything like this and I am unsure of how to keep the cuttings until spring. So far, what I've done is dipped the bottom ends of all the cuttings in rooting hormone and stuffed the bottom 3-4 inches into a mix of vermiculite and soil, since I could not find any sand. I watered it well and the containers have drainage holes in the bottom. I live in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and the winters get harsh around here. I've read not to baby the grapes and just let them stay out in the cold until spring, regardless of what the weather does. I've read conflicting information about roses, some say to keep a jar or bag over the top for humidity and some say to keep them warm. Does anyone have any advice as to whether I should leave them all outside, put them in the garage, keep them in the basement or in the house at room temperature? Also, any recommendations as to keeping a bag or jar over the top vs leaving the tops exposed? Any help is appreciated!
 
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I guess it depends.. I've put my rose cuttings outside. Just something like 8 at the spot where i want it to grow, no rooting hormone. If they all take , I'll have some roses to pass on. My grapes, I've put ten in one pot, got to get some more cuttings of my neighbor.  My figs, i put loads of them, different sizes of width and length in different spots in pots in the garage, outdoors, in the greenhouse.
I don't know what will work, because every climate is different, every cultivar reacts differently, every soil is different, just have to see what works. I trust big numbers is the way to go, getting loads and work on clever ways to plant them quickly in different habitats, you'll find what will work for you.
 
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I haven't successfully propagated hardwood cuttings yet.  I'll attempt a hundred in the next month though.  I'm going to try bottom heat per Edible Acres on YouTube.

If I had grape cuttings in small pots, I'd be really tempted to put them outside but bury them in the snow.  Just like a baby grape plant would experience.  That should protect it from the coldest temps of winter.
 
Brody Ekberg
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Location: Iron River MI
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As of now, I have the grape cuttings in the garage and the rose cuttings in our entryway with a bag over the top for humidity. The garage is not heated and the entryway is only maybe 10-15 degrees warmer than the outside. I suppose I will leave them as is for now until I feel something should be changed. I appreciate the input and am open to any suggestions. I will try to remember to post some results in the spring, but as I'm sure you all know, spring can be quite busy and exciting.
 
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I cut grape vines into pieces and shove them into a pot containing sand in the greenhouse, and water them as needed, more or less ignoring them until June or July when many will have sent out roots. I usually don't take cuttings until I prune the vines, about the time the snow melts in the spring. An entryway seems like a great place for them to overwinter.

I used to root them in water, but rooting in sand seems much easier and more reliable.
CIMG0858.JPG
[Thumbnail for CIMG0858.JPG]
Grapes rooting in bucket of water.
 
Brody Ekberg
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Location: Iron River MI
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I’m trying to revive this post a bit. None of the roses rooted, but I planted them anyway. Rabbits and deer ate them all, so I dont know if they’re were doing alright or not. Some of the grapes rooted, but most died within a year or being planted. The ones i kept probably had a lack of sunlight. Who knows with the ones I gave away.

So, I’m trying again! I’ve got a few grape vine hardwood cuttings in my entryway now hoping they will root. I’m considering taking more rose cuttings and possibly gooseberries and elderberries as well.

My question is, can all deciduous shrubs, like those listed, be basically treated the same for doing hardwood cuttings? And I’m also unsure whether to leave stuff outside throughout our winter, or shelter them in a cold entryway or garage instead? Also, do I keep the rooting medium moist and do I put a bag over the tops or leave them exposed?

Any advice is appreciated!

Thanks
-Brody
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