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This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEM curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the sand badge in Gardening.

Traditional gardens work really well when you have plants growing in them.  In a short season, some crops are better suited for transplanting while others do better when started from seed.  Let's focus on those that are best when direct seeded.  Seed packets usually have all the information you need to be successful, if not, the internet is your friend.  Let's grow some veggies!



Minimum requirements:
  - Plant 5 different species of culinary garden seeds
      - Please attempt 5 truly different species but if you do a couple from the same species (brassica oleracea, cucurbita pepo, etc) it's ok
  - Planted in the ground or a raised garden bed
        - Not in a pot or for later transplant
  - At least 4" of growth

Provide proof of the following as pictures or video (<2 min):
  - The area prior to planting
  - The five species of seeds
  - One example of each species with a ruler or clearly at least 4" tall
COMMENTS:
 
pollinator
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Question
Plans this year are to plant both a couple of  hills of maxima winter squash as well as two types of  summer squash grexes (made up mostly of pepo squash varieties) .  Would my squash be considered as one species or two for the purpose of this badge bit?
 
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Hmm, good question.  I was going to say no cuz they're all the same species but then the brassica species is even bigger and beginner gardeners may stumble on that.  

So I'm gonna say that different types of squashes can count towards the 5 types of seeds.  Same for brassica and any other widely diverse species.  At least until we find out this is a bad choice...

I'd encourage you to do 5 different actual species though if you can :)
 
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Mike Haasl wrote:Hmm, good question.  I was going to say no cuz they're all the same species



Cucurbita maxima and Cucurbita pepo are different species which only very, very rarely interbreed. I'm sure Joseph Lofthouse can explain further...

 
Mike Haasl
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Ahh, thanks!  I hadn't precisely read Dorothy's proposed cultivars because my mind prematurely wandered to all the possible issues related to the word "species".
 
Dorothy Pohorelow
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Mike Haasl wrote:Ahh, thanks!  I hadn't precisely read Dorothy's proposed cultivars because my mind prematurely wandered to all the possible issues related to the word "species".



This is actually why I asked my question.  There are so many things we grow that could end up being confusing when it comes to species.  Squash is one of them but Kale also has two species called kale and they cross with different things in the garden...  Greens are so mixed up I would simply say I planted a blend of greens and leave it at that.  Beans are normally one species (Phaseolus vulgaris) including what some folks call runner beans but I also have a small patch of true runner beans which are (Phaseolus coccineus)  so I could call them two species but I simply list them as beans in my garden...

And yes there was a reason I identified the species of squash I plan on growing not just saying winter squash and summer squash as Acorn squash ais a winter squash that is the same species of most summer squash ie a Pepo.  While Tromboncino is grown as a summer squash but is the same species as butternut winter squash...  
 
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Question for clarification - What about something like radishes that may not achieve 4" of growth?  As I'm thinking about this, they probably do achieve that, but a harvested plant with sufficient root should be evidence that it grew happily enough.  

I'm just thinking through what we grow directly from seed...we have a short enough season that we grow a lot from transplants.  Beans, carrots, kale, radishes, lettuce should do it...beets and turnips often get thrown into the mix...I guess we're OK there.  We typically grow onions from sets rather than seed, so I'm discounting that one.
 
Mike Haasl
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I'm counting above ground growth
 
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The only time I regularly observe spontaneous squash crosses between species happens with mixta/moschata. They mostly keep to themselves, but they have a fuzzy boundary between species.
 
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