gift
The Greenhouse of the Future ebook by Francis Gendron
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Steve Thorn

Plants grown as a Toilet Paper substitute.

 
Posts: 58
Location: Kansas Temperate Zone
9
forest garden food preservation cooking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Does anyone else have experience with this?  Plants You Can Grow That Make GREAT Toilet Paper Substitutes?
I found an interstein video on youtube titled "10 Plants You Can Grow That Make GREAT Toilet Paper Substitutes!"
Important note, NEVER USE POISEN IVY as toilet paper. I haven't, but I do know someone that did by accident, and
it was a very uncomfortable experience for them that lasted for days.
Be Blessed all.
 
gardener
Posts: 835
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
337
forest garden fish fungi trees food preservation cooking solar wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've used Mullein, which grows here in abundance. Don't remember how it was, so probably wasn't too bad. I think i'll opt for the waterbottle method half the world uses.
I saw this Indonesian man do it on a video, he didn't like toiletpaper. It went something like this.
He sat on the bowl just like one does. He had the bottle in his right hand, put it behind his back while still sitting down, put the pooring bit leaning against his crack and slowly poured some water down it while moving his left hand where the dirt was. He didn't get the toilet wet.
I haven't tried yet i must say. But like he claimed, he felt much cleaner, which i can imagine, since washing is better than wiping.
 
pollinator
Posts: 11804
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1090
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I read that Mullein may be irritating to some people's skin.  I have not tried it.  When I was on a wilderness program decades ago we used sticks, rocks, snow, etc.  No TP for a month.


If one keeps old cotton, silk, wool, or linen clothing, one could cut small squares for individual use and then bury them in the garden.
 
pollinator
Posts: 579
Location: South-central Wisconsin
219
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There's a weed that's common around here, called "butterprint". I'm sure it has other names. The leaves are big, soft, and velvety. It makes outstanding TP.

A few years ago I tried growing a type of gourd that had big soft leaves, much softer than the squash growing nearby. I think it was cuccuzzi. It would make a very nice TP, and it grows quickly enough to keep up with usage.

There are some types of beans that have big enough leaves it might be tempting to use them, but don't. They exude an acidic compound that can irritate the skin.
 
Posts: 167
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Been in India quite a few times, many years ago, and didn't use toilet paper, I did as all the other low budget travellers and locals, with hand and water.  While you do get a very clean behind, your left hand might not be 100% clean, and things could hide under the nails, even if washing with soap and water. I personnally would not do it anymore. The dirty water has to go somewhere, and I prefer dry toilets as water won't get contaminated.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1828
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
768
forest garden rabbit tiny house books solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have gourds growing on the farm and have in the past used the gourd Ieaves as toilet paper. These gourds are a large edible type, but they don't have a variety name since they are a landrace. But their leaves are large and soft feeling.
 
pioneer
Posts: 145
Location: Herding farming god of travel and fast horses.Holy fool.
53
sheep greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have used mullen and can say it works well.It's like using 10 ply.Maple leaves work,oak leaves.I've used smooth rocks in a pinch.I wonder how comfrey works?
 
pioneer
Posts: 241
98
hugelkultur forest garden books earthworks wofati composting toilet food preservation medical herbs building rocket stoves homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mallow?
 
gardener
Posts: 2926
Location: southern Illinois.
804
goat cat dog chicken composting toilet food preservation bee solar wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mullein....otherwise known as Coyboy Toilet Paper.  My property is covered with it.
 
Posts: 950
30
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would think banana leaves would work well
 
pollinator
Posts: 1819
Location: Denmark 57N
471
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think banana  leaves would be to shiny and stiff to work well. grass works brillienty and is very common and fast growing.
 
master steward
Posts: 5064
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1554
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The only plant that grows where I live that I would consider using would be plantain, plantago.  The leaves are soft.

If a person had plantain the banana-like plant, the peels might work.

I do have turks cap, a mallow and the leaves might work.
 
Posts: 63
13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Larry Jackson wrote:Does anyone else have experience with this?  Plants You Can Grow That Make GREAT Toilet Paper Substitutes?
I found an interstein video on youtube titled "10 Plants You Can Grow That Make GREAT Toilet Paper Substitutes!"
Important note, NEVER USE POISEN IVY as toilet paper. I haven't, but I do know someone that did by accident, and
it was a very uncomfortable experience for them that lasted for days.
Be Blessed all.



Anything with large, fuzzy leaves will work well. I agree with the suggestions to use Mullein. You may also want to consider thimbleberry. Thimbleberry has the advantage of being a perennial, whereas mullein is an annual and may need reseeding and weeding each and every year if it doesn't naturally reseed and outcompete the weeds. Mullein does, however, have the advantage of being a quick growing plant and able to grow in drier places than where a thimbleberry would grow. Thimbleberry normally only grows in somewhat moist locations. If growing thimbleberry for leaves, I would recommend harvesting leaves at the very end of the growing season in fall as the leaves are starting to lose their color, this will minimize harm to the plant when you harvest leaves it was just going to drop anyways, and allow for good strong regrowth the next year.
 
pollinator
Posts: 797
Location: NW California, 1500-1800ft,
181
hugelkultur dog duck
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thimbleberry would be my go to in the NW. Lamb’s-ears and mules’-ears are good plants for the hurried hole digging hiker, particularly further inland.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 3407
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
1298
3
forest garden foraging books food preservation cooking fiber arts bee medical herbs
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ahem. All you cowboy toilet paper lovers... Before you put that mullein near that sensitive area, you may want to rub a leaf over your face for a trial run. The hairs on mullein cause major itch extravaganza on my skin. Even harvesting it carefully with this in mind, the hairs can still find my bare skin. I end up with a rash. This is not a use of it for me.

Mullein does have a place in my herbal medicines though! My oils and teas get strained, removing the hairs first before use, and all is well!!!
gift
 
The Greenhouse of the Future ebook by Francis Gendron
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic