• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Kate Downham

What to do with a large quantity of really good chocolate that can't be eaten?

 
Posts: 67
5
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This one is painful. I ordered FIVE POUNDS of high quality chocolate, and the mailman left it on the porch and an animal got into it (racoon, I think). Most of it was left behind, but I think this makes the entire batch unfit to eat, because I don't know what animal it was with what diseases, what parts were touched AND I would likely eat some of the chocolate raw.

What's a good permie way to do something constructive with this stuff (beyond composting, of course).

I don't (yet) have chickens or any other animals to feed it to, so that's out.
 
gardener
Posts: 3667
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
994
cat pig rocket stoves
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh Man, Joshua Bummer !!!
As a card carrying certified chocoholic I feel your loss !
5 pounds ahhh I could cry!  Please don't say it was the rain forest chocolate ....

I'm bad but I would have to find at least some to eat... I mean really how bad could rabies be compared to high quality dark chocolate?

In all seriousness, I don't "think" dried saliva would carry a disease ... bite marks I would dispose of. But untouched looking pieces??? I couldn't help myself!
download-(45).jpg
[Thumbnail for download-(45).jpg]
 
pollinator
Posts: 658
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
257
forest garden fish fungi trees food preservation cooking solar wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Maybe you could melt the untouched bits on a fire, killing the microbes and then let it go hard again. Feed it to some neighborhoodkids and monitor if they're still alive in a few weeks or have started act weirdly or look different.;)
 
thomas rubino
gardener
Posts: 3667
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
994
cat pig rocket stoves
  • Likes 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Josh;
After careful consideration and long thought...
I can't let you test possible contaminated chocolate on the poor innocent neighborhood children.
As an ancient old man who has lived a happy chocolate filled life... I willingly volunteer myself in their place...
Just box up whats left and send it to me ....
I'll PM you the address.
 
pollinator
Posts: 253
Location: Beavercreek, OR
62
dog bike woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh disaster!  I hope that critter has a bad feeling in their stomach for a few days...

My assessment is that its been touched or drooled on, but it almost certainly hasn't had eggs laid in it.  This makes it easier to simply clean or sanitize instead of treating it like water that might have parasitic eggs and needs to be boiled for a while.

Alas, the melting point of chocolate is really low, and the recommended "don't heat over" temperature is just 120F or 49C - well below the 160F /72F that we would heat dishes or laundry in order to "sanitize" them.

So I got nothin but empathy.  Every other path is a Rube Goldberg contraption made into a plan.
 
gardener
Posts: 2998
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1090
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would think that this could be treated like "moldy cheese". I would carefully, probably using a hot knife, cut off 1/4 to 1/2 inch of chocolate all the way around each piece - assuming they were large, block-like pieces. I would work carefully, so that areas that have been "skinned" don't touch counters or hands that have been potentially contaminated.

Anything that definitely ugly I would toss. Chocolate removed that is just a "maybe", I'd look for a high-temp baking recipe - something like choco-chunk cookies - and unless the local vermin are known to be high risk, I'd assumed that baked in a 375 oven for 10 min should make it fairly safe. If we're dealing with an urban raccoon here, they're actually generally considered in Canada to be fairly healthy and not spread nasty stuff. Most urban dogs likewise. So unless local wisdom says there's a lot of rabies or something else equally bad in the area, I'd go for reasonable caution, or take up thomas' offer! (and expect him to reimburse you for the postage!!)
 
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
oh noses!  that is devastating.

I wouldn't eat it either.  I would use it as bait in the raccoon trap and complain to the shipping service for not placing it in a secure location.
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 2998
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1090
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

r ranson wrote: I would use it as bait in the raccoon trap and complain to the shipping service for not placing it in a secure location.

Actually, that's a good "barn door and horse" situation. With people having more and more things being delivered to their homes, having a secure from animals large box of some sort for the delivery people to put packages in might deserve some attention. Some services you can give directions to. Some latches can be closed without a key, but not re-opened without one. This issue deserves some attention, so maybe I'll start a specific thread for that. (and giver r ranson credit for the inspiration!)
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That's one of the main reasons I got a PO box - the group mailbox for our neighbourhood is too hot or too cold for most foodstuff (and dyes and inks, and ...).  I can also choose which part of town my PO box is in, so I can pick up the stuff on my lunch break.  
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 2998
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1090
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've started a thread here: https://permies.com/t/141182/Creating-safe-place-mail-order

A PO box works for many people but if there isn't one close to a convenient location, pop over and post some more ideas on the new thread please.
 
pollinator
Posts: 242
Location: Poland
85
purity dog forest garden tiny house books earthworks fiber arts writing wood heat rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh dear!

You can definitely make chocolate fondue, perhaps filter the chocolate first if it has some dirt in it. And boil it. And enjoy.

Also, I heard an interview with a cow breeder/butcher who was raising some extra delicious meat cows, pastured and spoiled, and he said that he feeds them chocolate to make their meat even more tasty. He said that they love it and have no problem digesting. If you don't have any cows, maybe some neighbours have?
 
pollinator
Posts: 362
Location: Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
151
dog
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Heat is your friend. Be it viral, bacterial or whatever. Assuming this is "solid" chocolate, and not "filled (cream or caramel centers) I would absolutely melt it down and filter it through cheese cloth and then use as intended. Especially if it can be reserved for baking where it would get "cooked" a second time.

And yes, knowing you have a chocolate predator in the neighborhood, provide a critter proof container for future deliveries. My first thought, is something like a NEW well sealed "Green Bin" designed for organic recycling...stands to reason they would be designed to be critter proof and sealed strongly.
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 2998
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1090
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lorinne Anderson wrote: My first thought, is something like a NEW well sealed "Green Bin" designed for organic recycling...stands to reason they would be designed to be critter proof and sealed strongly.

My sister's city in Ontario got new green bins specifically to keep the raccoon out - they figured out within a week how to defeat them. Smart, motivated critters, and it's been shown that despite eating a lot of garbage, they're generally healthier than their country counterparts!
 
pollinator
Posts: 959
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
211
duck tiny house chicken composting toilet homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jay Angler wrote:My sister's city in Ontario got new green bins specifically to keep the raccoon out - they figured out within a week how to defeat them. Smart, motivated critters, and it's been shown that despite eating a lot of garbage, they're generally healthier than their country counterparts!



I know they've defeated me many times, though that may not be saying much.  In my opinion, the only good raccoon is a dead raccoon.  I smile whenever I see one on the highway.  I like everything else and prefer to live and let live but, if you ever hear of a guy in New Brunswick getting busted for trying to buy a rocket launcher, it'll be because I lost to the raccoons one too many times.  They can be cute, though.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 1585
Location: southern Illinois.
319
composting toilet food preservation homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Rabies appears to be very fragile...dead within 2 hours.  I would cut away damaged portions, and pour boiling water over the rest. That would be overkill for most potential problems.  The other option is compost.
 
gardener
Posts: 3070
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
331
forest garden trees urban
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


Around here they sell a corn liquor call Everclear.
It's mostly good for trying to killing the people who drink it,  but it's also an effective killer of pathogens at 92.4% ethanol by weight.
Maybe this high proof liquor could be a no heat, food safe solution?
 
master steward
Posts: 3838
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1116
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like William's idea!

Here is how to make Chocolate Liqueur

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/01/diy-chocolate-liqueur-how-to-make-creme-de-cacao-recipe.html

Here are some dessert recipes that use chocolate liqueur as an ingredient:

https://www.yummly.com/recipes/chocolate-liqueur-dessert

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipes/17826/desserts/specialty-desserts/liqueur-desserts/chocolate-liqueur/



 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 3838
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1116
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A friend of mine used to have a locking mail box so one of these might work for you:

https://www.amazon.com/locking-mailbox

Here are some examples, they come in all sizes and prices:



Amazon Link




Amazon Link




Amazon Link
 
pollinator
Posts: 141
41
books food preservation fiber arts
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

thomas rubino wrote:Oh Man, Joshua Bummer !!!
As a card carrying certified chocoholic I feel your loss !
5 pounds ahhh I could cry!  Please don't say it was the rain forest chocolate ....

I'm bad but I would have to find at least some to eat... I mean really how bad could rabies be compared to high quality dark chocolate?

In all seriousness, I don't "think" dried saliva would carry a disease ... bite marks I would dispose of. But untouched looking pieces??? I couldn't help myself!




siliva can carry desieses like rabies. When it is dry it should not be active but I found one sourse that said they would still advise getting treatment if someone had been in contact with salivaeven when dried.   And eating it could give you rabies. So why rick eatting it?   Even if it's not rabies other things can be in saliva  Yes most things  die when it has dried up, and been exposed to air and sunlight   I love chocolate too but why risk getting some desiese.  No Thank you.  
gift
 
10 Podcast Review of the book Just Enough by Azby Brown
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic