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Excessive heat warning keeping chickens cool.

 
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You may think I'm a nut, but one of the things I worry most about when we have a heat warning is my chickens.  It was 108 today.  The coop has lots of shade most of the roof is shaded by a large almond tree.  I have an old box fan. I removed all the plastic grating from both sides, and have chicken wire on both sides, so it blows quite a bit of air. I make sure there is lots of fresh water. I bought a little kiddy's pool and put about 3" of water in it. I was hoping they might walk in it to get a drink, and cool off there feet. No they just drink out of it. I did put one of my hens in the pool, and she staid there for a few minutes, so maybe it felt good.   I put a bowl of water with large chunks of ice.  When I checked on them about 3:30 they looked pretty unhappy.  Wings out breaks wide open, some were panting. I sprayed them with the hose.  They didn't like it at all, but, seemed like they were in less distress.  Not sure what else to do. I have tried misters in the past, but all it did is keep the chickens out of the coop, and that is the coolest place.  My husband suggested I put a mister close to the fan so it might cool the air, but evaporate before it can get to the hens.  If I can find a mister, I may try that. I figured I'm not the only one keeping chickens in hell, I mean California, and other hot places, so I thought I might ask what you do to protect your chickens from excessive heat?
 
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My chickens are still in the brooder and I'm already worried about how they'll handle the heat once they go outdoors full time. So I totally get the worry. I have been reading about how to help them manage the heat. Most of what I read sounds like what you're already doing. But this lady, who is some kind of chicken herbalist, had some ideas I hadn't seen elsewhere. Maybe some of them will be helpful to you? Heat Stress Management
Hope your chickens stay healthy and happy in the heat and that some other folks with experience chime in!
 
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Wow Jen, that's hot!

I was thinking of starting a thread on this subject, but life's been really busy. Some of these ideas may not help you, but might give you ideas or help someone else:

1 and 2: Instead of misting the chickens themselves, we mist their houses. We made a PVC pipe stand with a misting nozzle attached to a scrap of hose at the top and a quick-connect so I can attach it to the main hose. The picture is of our meat birds, and we always salvage and repair old umbrellas to give them shade in their portable run (and they discourage aerial predators). We hammer a piece of rebar into the ground, and slide the umbrella tube over the rebar.


3. We had a heat wave recently, while BWD was sitting on eggs in what I refer to as a "brooder cube". I salvaged some used pond liner last year to cover the cubes and realized, that by using some branches, I could make a shallow "pond" on the roof of her cube for evaporation cooling. We've tried something similar by putting an old wet sheet on top, but on a temporary basis it was a nuisance as if it dried it would too easily blow off. If it was a stationary setting, I would be very tempted to make the building strong enough to handle a green roof!


4. Abbey is also sitting on eggs, on the south side of the back well shed. The next picture shows that I've used salvaged coffee sacks to give shade to her shelter, but I intentionally got them wet during our heat wave. Too late for her, you can see at the corner that I've planted a climbing squash. The idea was that the squash would climb up and cover the brooder cube, but alas, she's due in 3 days and the squash is only marginally larger than the picture shows.


5. Last but not least - yes, chickens aren't that keen on being in water, but have you considered putting a bin or two of damp soil in their coop? Our shelters don't have floors and are portable, so the mister in the first picture is always put on the side of the shelter that will be the next "move", so the birds are moving onto damp soil.
 
pollinator
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Howdy neighbor! I've used a mister before, and hung it over their favorite shade spot. They still used the spot, so it seemed the mister did not bother them, and hopefully helped. I also tried setting up a little water bubbler, thinking they might scratch through the cool wet soil. They would avoid it while the bubbler was on, but then scratch when it was turned off.

Thank you for the reminder that I need to set the mister up again! I moved recently and had forgotten about it.
 
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I wonder if a really nice cool bucket of sand in the shade would help?  Chickens like dust baths, and if the earth is cool from the shade, maybe it'd help cool them down?

(We don't usually get prolonged heat, especially not prolonged heat over 100F. I don't know what that does to the soil temperature, even in the shade.)
 
pollinator
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I think cool fresh water and shade is all chickens need in my area. It has been over 100 a couple of times so far with very high humidity and they do not seem to mind. I used misters in the past but my girls do not like the mist.
I have a shaded pen, 20x12 with another 20x5 in full sun plus a small enclosed shed they sleep and lay in.  When it is this hot they still go into sunny areas throughout the midday for dust-baths and just to hang out in the sun.  They do take a couple naps throughout the day though.
I have a large pond and notice all the very large wild birds out in the heat as well.  Herons, egrets,etc...   My girls are Astro-whites, ( australorp, leghorn cross).  Perhaps the white colors keep them cooler?  Anyway, I keep the fresh cool water coming and ensure they have shade if they choose to be in it.  They seem very happy and content.
I have been in chicken factories before with 1000's of birds in big warehouses being speed grown for markets... now those places are sweltering.  (That's when I started raising my own for meat...just terrible). I am no chicken expert but birds are resistant in extreme heat and cold from what I have seen, I do like to keep my girls happy though.
 
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I'v shown this one before and am still using it.  This is a 12v radiator fan out of a junk car.  They are cheap and brushless.  I just hooked it straight to 50 watts of solar.  It fires up when the sun hits the panels and shuts off when the sun goes down.  The chickens or turkeys all line up behind it.
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Jay Angler
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Ralph Sluder wrote:

I am no chicken expert but birds are resistant in extreme heat and cold from what I have seen, I do like to keep my girls happy though.

As a general observation, I agree. However, extremes can be a threat because the birds adapt to what they're used to. Our first "heat wave" this year appeared suddenly when the overnight lows were still in the 6C range - the girls still had their winter feathers and they definitely benefited from a little help. We saw a *lot* of feathers dropped over a short period!

It is also like the discussion of "Landrace" over in the seeds and breeding forum this week - animals hatched and raised in a certain climate profile will adapt to that environment both from the experience of growing up in it, and more gradually over successive generations. There are studies that show that Inuit in Canada's extreme north have differences in their biology compared to "average" humans, and humans adapt to elevation within weeks of being in mountains.
 
Ralph Sluder
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That makes sense.   So my birds being from this hot humid climate for generations should be fine.  
I'll make sure not to get any birds from up north.
 I can't take that cold myself, bring on the heat.
 
Jen Fulkerson
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5 of my hens are a couple years old, so they have been through this kind of weather before, though I try to keep an eye on the Salmon Faverolle's they look like chubby little birds until you pick one up, and realize they are all feather. Combine that and the fact that mine aren't very bright, and very low on the pecking order, they need a little care. The rest of my girls were hatched in late September 2020, so this is a new experience for them.  So far everyone is doing fine.  They seem to stay in the coop in the shade where the fan blows, not doing much, I imagine to try to stay cool.
Thanks for all of your input, it appreciated.  It's supposed to be 111 today, wish us luck.
 
Jen Fulkerson
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Christopher I love your set up.  When it gets hot I run the coop fan 24/7 so not only would it be nice to have it go on and off by itself, but it would save money.  I'm going to show this to my boys, both are very handy. Thanks
 
Jen Fulkerson
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Late afternoon I take out ice to put in the water, and one of my Faverolle's is standing in the pool, made me feel like it wasn't a waist after all.  I put some of the chickens that looks super hot in there, some jump out right away, but some will stand in it for a few minutes.  I only put water in it on very hot days, and only 2 or 3 inches, enough to cool there feet without getting there bodies wet. I put fresh water everyday, because some drink out of it.  Everyone was fine. Still eating, drinking, and same egg production, so to me that says of course they're miserable (like the rest of us) but they aren't in to much distress.  Thanks
 
Juniper Zen
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Glad your girls made it through, Jen. Sadly my best mama hen passed today. Her latest chicks are already 2 months old, but I was hoping she would raise many more broods for me.
 
Jen Fulkerson
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Juniper I am so sorry about your mother hen.  It happens to all of us, but that doesn't make it any easier.  My heart goes out to you.
 
pollinator
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When we were little, my mother used to have us go out and spray water from the hose up into the trees closest to the house. The evaporative cooling effect, even in our humid Southern climate, was pretty significant. You might try that.

 
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I'm probably not as good a steward to my chickens as I should or could be, but I'm getting eggs every day right now.  My oldest bird is nine years old and still laying.  My youngest two are now three years old and everybody else is in between.  Nine total.

It was 114 here on Wednesday 110-112 most of the rest of the week.   It's unusual for spring, but we get days like this in summer.  It'll be 105+/- everyday with few exceptions  until the middle of September.  Humidity in the low teens most of the time.

My birds definitely get to panting, and holding their wings out a bit to keep cool.  I've never put a fan on them, but I do occasionally douse the whole floor of the coop with water from the hose.  I only do that a couple of times a week, though.  I have a very unique setup currently which I think is almost ideal given the climate, but that being said, out of the nine years I've had chickens here, for about seven of them they were either directly on the ground, or on a mound of deep wood chips.  I've only ever had four chickens pass away, and two of them happened in winter from ?.  One died from heat exhaustion when it escaped from the coop in summer and couldn't find its way back in.  The other had a prolapse, so I terminated it.

My current setup I think is much better, and it just happened by coincidence.  Their coop is actually an in ground swimming pool filled with several feet of wood chips.  The pool collects rain water (which is pretty rare these days here) and that filters to the bottom of the wood chips.  The chickens can dig down several inches and there is a layer of very moist worm infested compost they can push against which I think cools them down a bit.  I see them do it all the time.

I think Jay mentioned moist soil as being a good thing, and Jen mentioned having a plastic pool.  Maybe fill the pool with compost, then add a bunch of water to the pool so that the top layer was dry, but if they dig down a bit they can get to the really moist part.  This would be easy to maintain, they wouldn't be drinking the gross poopy water, mosquitoes wouldn't be a problem, there'd be less evaporation (I think) and at the end of the year that would be awesome compost to use in the garden due to the inevitable fertilization.  

It works here on a much larger scale, not so sure about it working in the kiddie pool.

Good luck.

Edit.  I'd recommend some kind of fence, or keeping the pool only half full (or half empty) to keep the birds from kicking the compost out of the pool, and maybe suspend their water source or food source above the pool to get them to use it.  I find that my chickens favourite place to dig is right under the five gallon bucket with poultry nipples on it.  It's more moist there due to the water that drips off the nipples when they drink.
 
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You want heat? We got it in Central Texas. Every year when egg production starts to drop, we start putting ice cubes in a feeder. Then we fill the outside with pellets.

The ice melts down and floods the feeder cups with ice cold water, making a slurry of cold feed. Chickens see us coming from afar and run over for an icy snack.

That car radiator fan trick is a great idea.  We make sure our birds have shade around their fenced area (zone 2 in our permie plan).  An old trailer that's not roadworthy anymore, an overhead rack pulled off an old plumber's truck, etc.  In extreme heat, hose down under their shade areas several times a day.
 
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We’re in central Florida and it has been an unseasonably hot year so far, even for us. I designed our coop to be on a decommissioned trailer so it could be mobile, but it serves several functions to help with heat. The single pitch roof, combined with a ventilated floor, creates a “chimney effect,” and exchanges hot air in the coop with the cool air below constantly and very effectively. The area under the coop also remains very cool even when the coop is in direct sunlight, and the chickens will hang out there exclusively during the heat of the day. Further, the onboard rainwater collection system has a “boom” with watering nipples that extend down so they have access to water when they’re hanging out underneath. This design is also excellent for aerial predators, as they can take cover from 360 degrees and don’t have to find a door, and remain there in comfort as long as necessary for the eagle, hawk, or owl to give up and leave. I have a vid of the design I will try to post in case it might help someone else.


 
 
 
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Great thread and something I was worried about this past week and looking into the next couple months when it does get hot here.

Fortunately my ladies have plenty of shade if needed and plenty of sun if needed.  

I have an electric fence that is over 200 feet long.  (It really helps to turn it on tho, Fox a few weeks ago tried to get them, but only got a few feathers.  Now that I am training myself to keep it turned on, the predators have decided that it hurts when they think of my birds.)

Inside that fenced area is a lot of trees.  There are dust baths all over that the girls have made.  When my dog was left inside the fence, (did not know she came in when I got eggs), I found her and the chickens all cooling in the dirt.

I have a large orange plastic barrel for a waterer.  Last week it hit 102 for a couple days and I was worried about the water being hot.  I checked it mid afternoon and it was surprisingly cool.  And the chickens love to scratch under the nipples in the wet ground.  When I dump the barrel out to replace the water every few days they love the wet ground.

My coop has a lot of different doors on it that I leave open and put chicken wire over at night in case a predator does get in through the fence.

Heather, that was a good article on heat stress managment.  thanks for sharing it.

 
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I'm in Northern California too and it has been really hot! We have our coop under the canopy of a huge oak tree so it is in constant shade in the summer. Just beyond the edge of the oak canopy we have a small grove of elderberry. We loop a mister among the trees and once the temp hits 100+, the mister goes on. We get a breeze from the south called the Delta breeze that comes from the ocean through San Francisco and up the central valley. This breeze is a cooling breeze and helps drop temps especially under trees. Coupled with the mister, the temp under the trees and surrounding shaded area is a good 10--15 degrees cooler. We also make sure they have fresh cool water every morning and the water is kept in the shade. We've tried freezing brewery grain so they can peck on it, but I don't know how much that really helps.
 
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I have my chicken coop and runs located in and around a bamboo grove.  The bamboo canopy has high levels of transpiration, so the entire grove acts as a giant swamp cooler with measured temperatures in the grove up to 7 degrees cooler than in the shade underneath nearby trees.  Under windless conditions, you can feel the cooler air sinking down from the canopy.  Chickens evolved with bamboo in Southeast Asia, where they are called “bamboo fowl”, and are strongly attracted to it, spending a lot of their time scratching and resting in it.  Many of my smaller, wilder breed chickens, such as red jungle fowl and old English game, prefer to roost for the night up in the bamboo canopy rather than in the coop.
 
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Joe,

You must live nearby because it was 108° here too on the day you posted.

Our chickens like to hang-out in front of the crawl space vents, so I’ve set up shades and water (with block ice)  and treats (frozen watermelon) by the vents.

I put a little black fan for them right outside the kitchen vent but they didn’t like it, they just walked away from it, and went to the other vent.

I recently built a raised bed with legs. It’s high enough for the chickens to get under and I put their water under it.
 
pollinator
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Heather Sharpe wrote:My chickens are still in the brooder and I'm already worried about how they'll handle the heat once they go outdoors full time. So I totally get the worry. I have been reading about how to help them manage the heat. Most of what I read sounds like what you're already doing. But this lady, who is some kind of chicken herbalist, had some ideas I hadn't seen elsewhere. Maybe some of them will be helpful to you? Heat Stress Management
Hope your chickens stay healthy and happy in the heat and that some other folks with experience chime in!



Thank you for this excellent link. I'm in a zone 4 b but in WI, our climate is continental, so when the humidity kicks in as well, they really look stressed: panting, wings outstretched, uninterested in eating... My birds are laying adults, so no brooder for them. If I had baby chicks, I might put them in a larger enclosure and hang the heat high as far as possible from them.[They may no longer *need* the brooding lamp, except perhaps at night].
Yes, changing the water often, even putting a tray of ice cubes in the water could help. I have 2 water containers and they should be in the shade to keep the water cool longer. As I'm growing fruit & nut trees in their fenced area, they have ample shade as soon as they go out.
The one thing I have not seen in the recommendations is changing the litter more often: Chicken poop can 'ripen' awfully fast in their coop and if it doesn't get changed, ammonia is the result. That is really bad for them. I keep them in only at night, the rest of the time, they are out in the woods.
Incidentally, because of the winters here, I have a hoop house in which they can go when I'm changing the litter and the snow is too high. It can get hellishly hot in there in the summer. I open the door wide and I have a whole long side that is opens completely. It still gets hot. It is nice that they can go out and stay dry even when it rains, but I've noticed during the heat they'd rather stay in the coop than go in their "winter run" until I come to open the door for them.
I must say, I had not really thought about it, but that "winter run" needs to get cleaned too, even though their poop in there is very dry. I don't relish the idea as I'll have to do it bucket by bucket. [Thank goodness, my garden will welcome the side dressings]. I probably should add  some chips in there as well [they started with bare dirt floor and bags of leaves]
 
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Sizzlingly scorching hot here. so the 10' square coop is wrapped with scraps of black shade cloth.
Sometimes the cloth gets sprayed down, mostly to clean the dust off of it and improve airflow.

Eight old hens have high carbon deep litter of rice hulls to scuffle through to fluff and keep the flies down.
For most of the day, our chickens free range here, however we have to let them out of the coop after noon
due to blue jays flying in and pecking the eggs otherwise for their hungry chicks.
Running from shade tree to tree. They dig 'chicken divets" though the deep chips, into the damp sand around the pomegranate trees,
which makes catchment basins for rare watering and prevents damp mulch on trunk rot issues.
The attraction of the shady trees enables the hens to keep the potential pests and parthenogens down as well!
Speaking of pests= The hens have a dedicated dust bath of sand and  diatomaceous earth in a cracked cement mixing tub in the shade.
We put food waste and fruit scraps in the freezer and feed it to them when its hot so they keep their fluids up...
as well as raising meal worms for them. The meal worms seem to grow/reproduce really fast in this heat!
Hens are still laying really well and I have a question of egg edibility/safety if they get to hot in the nest box??
    Unfortunately nest boxes are on hot west side of coop.
Water is in a 2 gallon bucket covered with a broken tile in the coop. It is dumped onto goji hedge on east side of coop every morning when it is refilled.
            Hens really enjoy eating the goji leaves they can reach, which surprised me since it is nightshade family!!
They also have water stations in a few other places scattered around the yard for insurance.
I notice they tend to forage later on hot days, when the blazing fireball sun finally begins to set.
We were putting Apple Cider Vinegar in it for electrolytes(?) but it seemed to affect the shells and we had to be conscience of where we dumped it.
 
Jen Fulkerson
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Hi Everyone, thanks for all your comments, and helpful information.  
I learned something new while trying to find an answer to Juju's question.  Did you know high carb food like crackers, and scratch ect. actually warm chickens from inside out. So it's advised to skip that food during high heat. I didn't know, I think I will stop giving scratch for a while, and see if I notice a difference in there behavior.
Juju I wish I could be of some help to you, but all be darned if I can find an answer.  All I could find is to be safe the eggs in the coop should be 65.  I doubt mine are that low at least half a year.  Plus if a hen is setting on an egg you know it's warmer than that.  The general consensus seems to be when in doubt float them to be sure.  Not very helpful I know. If I were you I would just make it as shady as possible, gather them as early as you can, and call it good.  
I found a egg in the middle of the yard the other day, late in the afternoon, and it was so hot I couldn't keep it in my hand for long.  I composted it.  I just didn't see how it could be good.  Good luck to you, and all of you.  Try to keep 😎.
 
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Fresh water throughout the day.
Lots of wind up here in the high desert.
Lost 3 hen's this past week, plenty of shade, large, walk in Coop's w/ screen doors...even a free range  rooster found a way to keep a cool head by sticking his head under the corner of the Barn, got pic but not sure if it is possible to post pic's🤠👍.
 
Dennis Barrow
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I was just thinking that if it takes more for the chickens to digest regular feed, (and this warms them up), maybe soaking the food would be better for them.

I have been soaking their food for a couple days before giving it to them for almost 7 months now.  I has cut down on $$ buying feed by almost 1/2.

Maybe I am aiding them during the hot days.
 
Jay Angler
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Dennis Barrow wrote:I was just thinking that if it takes more for the chickens to digest regular feed, (and this warms them up), maybe soaking the food would be better for them.
Maybe I am aiding them during the hot days.

I'm not sure soaking will change the energy involved in digestion all that much, and that's where the heat's coming from, but it *absolutely will* help to keep them hydrated, and it certainly won't do them any harm. Just like humans, a huge amount of the actual "digesting" is being done by microbes in the gut - all animals/birds are really just microbe protection agencies!  I suspect soaked feed compared to large seeds like corn does require less breaking down and more is likely absorbed rather than going straight through the bird, which is why soaking reduced your feed bill.
 
Cécile Stelzer Johnson
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Dennis Barrow wrote:I was just thinking that if it takes more for the chickens to digest regular feed, (and this warms them up), maybe soaking the food would be better for them.
I have been soaking their food for a couple days before giving it to them for almost 7 months now.  I has cut down on $$ buying feed by almost 1/2.
Maybe I am aiding them during the hot days.



That may be an idea. However, you know when *you* feel all blah from the heat and don't care to eat. Well, it works the same way in chickens. When you say: "soak their food", I will assume that you mean whole grains? Because it is true that once the grain is germinating, more nutrients are available, so it makes sense that you can give them less and still have them satisfied.
Otherwise, especially during hot periods, you may have mold developing in their feed, and that is dangerous.
https://www.mypetchicken.com/backyard-chickens/chicken-help/Can-I-give-my-chickens-moldy-bread-moldy-H277.aspx#:~:text=No%2C%20your%20chickens%20should%20not,good%20idea%20(in%20moderation).&text=Chickens%20can%20get%20food%20poisoning%2C%20too.
 
Dennis Barrow
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I buy the chicken feed pellets.  Soak them for 2 days and then give them to the chickens in the am.
So far the food is gone before it gets hot.
I soak the feed indoors, (garage), where it is cool.  Mold was something I was concerned about when I started to do this, but have not had that problem yet.
 
Jen Fulkerson
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Dennis does it make it like a mush?  I threw some pellets in with my grain and it was a mushy mess.  The chickens still eat it, but I decided to leave it dry.  Your definition of soaking is my definition of fermenting in the summer.  In the summer I soak wheat and barley 2 to three days.  I give it a shake each day.  ( in the winter it takes about 4 days)  fermenting and sprouting make the nutrients more available to the hens.  I tried both. I'm lazy, and live where water must be conserved, so fermenting is a great deal easier, and uses less water.  (unless you have a fancy system that recycles the water, which didn't)  From what I have read you can ferment what ever you want.  I tell everyone who has chickens to give it a try.  It's super easy, healthier for the hens, there for healthier eggs for us and reduced feed cost. There really is no down side.  As far as mold goes I have never had an issue.  As long as there is enough water to cover what you are fermenting.  I don't worry about fermenting gone bad.  I don't really like the smell, I don't think sour dough, or anything fermented smells good.  That being said if you have left fermenting to long, you will know.  The stinky fermented smell turns to a make you want to throw up smell.  There is no worries about if it has gone to far, believe my you will know.  You have to burry it, or put it in a place the hens can't get, because they will eat it anyway.  I learned this the hard way by trying to put it in the compost pile and they having to fight the chickens off long enough to get it berried.  I'm sure some got eaten, but no chicken died.
Sorry off the keeping chickens cool subject.  I was putting scratch in my fermented grains, as well as feeding it to them dry, but I'm going to eliminate that for the hottest months of the year.  I will also be putting any bread, crackers, pasta, and rice in the out of the coop compost in the hot weather instead of letting the chickens have it.  Don't feel bad for them, they get a lot more over ripe or left over veggies in the summer, so it will even out.
Good luck to all of you.  I was very lucky and didn't loose any chickens.  The temperature is suppose to go down for a few days, we will all enjoy a little reprieve.  I'm so sorry if you lost Chickens during the heat wave.  It is always sad and hard to deal with, but some times no matter how hard we try bad things happen.  All we can do is move on caring for the hens that made it.  
P.S. If your not fermenting, grains or feed, ect. give it a try, you wont be sorry.  There is tons on the internet about it. This is a very informative one.
 
Christopher Shepherd
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Here is another idea since it seems the sun drives all of this heat.  How about putting a bowl of water on a tec assembly like this one.  I use them to heat water in the winter and to cool it in the summer.  I just flip them over depending what we need.  Sometimes they are cheap or can be found in old used trucker cooler/wine cooler.   I take off the fan of the side I have the water bowl on. Here again I just hook it to a solar panel and let it work when the sun shines.  This one takes 60w at 12v.

It is odd weather here in the low 60"s and into the 40's tonight like last week.
IMG_20190205_210905191.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190205_210905191.jpg]
 
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I live in the high desert of southern Utah, usual high summer temps are in the low 90's but we do reach 100 degrees occasionally.  Humidity is usually low, today it was 7%, yesterday it was 15%.  I ran a 20' section of 3/4" pipe up the middle of a tree and put a pop-up sprinkler at the top.  On hot days I connect the hose and let it rain down on the chicken area.  As the water drips down through the tree it cools the tree and the air and eventually the ground.  Any water that misses the trees soaks the ground and cools off the ground.  The first few minutes the birds walk away from the area but once they get used to the water falling they walk back and start scratching the ground, enjoying their cool sprinkle of water.
Depending on the day, 45 minutes to an hour is plenty to cool the area off for the afternoon.

I have another sprinkler in a tree in the back yard and if we plan to sit in the yard in the evening I run that sprinkler about 30 or 40 minutes to cool off the yard.  The more tree branches and bushes the water can reach the more it will cool the area.  On a 95* day cooling the yard (trees, bushes and ground) down to about 75 or 80 makes for a comfortable evening.  The air outside the area will still be hot but the evaporation will cool the air where you want to relax.
 
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The German news reports on excessive heat warnings for big parts of the Western USA. Apparently lots of houses in the Seattle and Oregon area are not equipped with AC.
Are you taking precautions as humans as well?
 
Jen Fulkerson
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We don't have central air, but we have window units in the bedrooms. We keep the shades closed drink lots of water, and retreat to the bedroom when it becomes unbearable.  
Our town has cool places for people to go who are homeless, or not equipped to deal with it. I don't know much about it, but saw it on the news.  A cool place with water and snacks where people are welcome, is all I know.
The sad truth is even in these advanced times people, especially the elderly still die in these severe heat waves.
 
master steward
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You might try the trick I mention last year when It was so hot I was afraid we were going to lose our phone system.

Freeze bottles of water then let your fan blow air on the bottle as the defrost.  I use the gallon bottles because it takes longer for them to thaw out.

This is a crazy year.
 
Jay Angler
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Anne Miller wrote:Freeze bottles of water then let your fan blow air on the bottle as they defrost.  I use the gallon bottles because it takes longer for them to thaw out.

This only really helps if the equipment you're using to freeze the bottles is outside - if you use your fridge freezer in the house, the fridge works harder and releases more heat into the house because that's how fridges work. We've got a freezer outside under our barn overhang, and I'm thinking of taking some ice cube trays up there to make ice if I get desperate.
 
Anne Miller
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My freezers are outside, too.  But I have already frozen bottles in the freezer part of the fridge leftover from a previously predicted power outage and the rolling blackout from February.
 
Cécile Stelzer Johnson
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Anne Miller wrote:My freezers are outside, too.  But I have already frozen bottles in the freezer part of the fridge leftover from a previously predicted power outage and the rolling blackout from February.



Keeping frozen gallons of water also helps keeping the rest of the contents cold too. [like when your freezer is barely quarter full].
If my girls were in danger of getting a heat stroke, I would definitely use frozen gallons and a fan, even if it isn't as "energy saving" as I'd like. [Priorities!]
 
Jen Fulkerson
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As hard as I try, I still lost a chicken.  There's a place in the back fence where a few of the determined hens can get out. It's on my to do list.  A few days ago they discovered they can get  into my veggie garden ( one of the gates is only about 3' high.) So I have been working on extending the hight of the fence, and fixing the "escape hatch".  I got most of it done Last night.  I have one chicken I actually named Houdini because she comes and goes as she pleases.  I did a head count 18, but wait Houdini is in the coop. A Sapphire gem is missing. Nosy, she is missing. ( Named because she is.  Always in my business. If I'm hammering a nail, she is pecking the nail. She popped her head up to see what I was sawing with the circular saw once. If I'm weeding she will push me out of the way. You get the idea.)  I looked everywhere.  She didn't show up today either.  I looked again. No dead or live hen. No feathers, no sign of struggle.  Just gone.  I don't know if something got her, or she got to hot and died somewhere. I think it's almost harder not knowing.  She could still show up, but I doubt it.  Usually when they get out, come evening I will find them roosting on the fence behind the coop.  It's super hot again, and they are so friendly, and trusting, it makes them easy pray.  I bummed. She was one of my favorites.
 
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