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Pallet Yurt.

 
pioneer
Posts: 167
Location: Herding farming god of travel and fast horses.Holy fool.
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sheep greening the desert
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Pallet yurt design.8x8 foot sleeps 2 comfortably.7 pallets and a notched door.I'm trying to get the holes in the smokering right.I'd like to use  inch wooden poles or 1 inch conduit.Octagon smokerings our easier to make then wheels.I'm sewing a cover out of old blue jeans.What makes it a yurt is that it's temperary.It could be converted into a hogan if it is made more permanent.Make a foundation for it  put a tin roof on it and slipstraw walls would be awesome.Anyways hope this inspires somebody.Get out your seat.Get out there and try somethin.
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palletyurtsmokering.jpg
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pollinator
Posts: 2363
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
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Nice! The uses are endless. Except I have a hard time finding tall, good pallets all of the same size.
 
pollinator
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Location: Marmora, Ontario
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Really cool idea.

I was thinking of a barn-truss pallet structure, where the trusses were formed by the joined sides of pallets. Essentially, the roof would be assembled in barn truss arches of five pallets each, and set atop a box of pallet walls of appropriate size. At least a two-bedroom, maybe three with a loft.

Unfortunately, pallets in useable condition are becoming more expensive with the increased cost of lumber. You obviously found what you need. I would suggest deconstruction and reuse rather than demolition and burning when you're done with this iteration. Though by that time, pallet prices might have come down.

Great idea, though. I was considering a yurt recently, but the land we're buying has a cottage on it, so we'll work with that first.

-CK
 
master gardener
Posts: 6864
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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Ben - how have you joined the pallets together - I think I can see a little wire in the picture, but it's not clear? If it's temporary, I find nails a pain to remove, so I'd want to use something else. Similarly, how are the "rafters" attached to the skids?

It would weaken the structure to rotate the roof so the one rafter wasn't in the center of the door, but maybe it could be shorter? Some yurt doors have a curve above them in the roof to redirect water. That said, many places that use yurts traditionally were not known for the kind of rain the Wet Coast gets!

I'm thinking the concept also might make a good temporary chicken coop?
 
gardener
Posts: 610
Location: Geraldton, Ontario -Zone 1b
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I thought it was cool until I read this part:

Ben Skiba wrote:I'm sewing a cover out of old blue jeans.



Now, I think it's awesome.
 
pollinator
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Location: BC Interior, Zone 6-7
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I'm curious about your rafters, too. What keeps them from spreading and the roof flattening?

I like the idea very much. I'm often mulling over ideas for quick guest housing. Enticing family to visit would be easier if it wasn't a bring your own tent situation here.
 
pollinator
Posts: 200
Location: Saskatchewan
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I like this idea and design. Simple yet effective.
 
Ben Skiba
pioneer
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Location: Herding farming god of travel and fast horses.Holy fool.
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The Walls I used bailing wire to tie them together.There our 2x4's I drilled on top of the pallets.I feel like a plate where they join would be good.I'm Trying to make another smoke ring with 1 inch holes in using 1 inch round wood or conduit.I'm struggling with drilling the same angle everytime.I made a jig for it but they still seem to be off.I'm working on it.For the moment I used screws and toenailed it in just to see how it would work.You could use 2x4's or round or rough lumber for the walls instead of pallets I feel like.Yeh the rafter by the door can knock some common sense into you if your not paying attention.Could definitely shorten it. If it were more permanent I feel like a you could put a 8 foot porch ajoining off of the roof.A pallet shed's our great I built one at my dad's house 14 years ago it's still standing.Yeh it'd make an awesome chicken coop haha.
 
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Quality pallets: try the large "flooring" stores in industrial parks. Often they come on pallets from the source country and made out of the same exotic woods. Let that sink in. Often the cheapest available wood for pallets in the areas where high end wooden flooring comes from are those same forests. The carbon foot print has already been done.  I floored a small (500 sq foot) house entirely with things like Teak, for the trouble of going, looking, asking about the stacks of pallets behind those huge industrial park buildings. They were grateful not to pay to haul it off to be burned (gasp!) and I drove off going "BwaaHaaHaa! Scored!"
 
leigh gates
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Also, same industrial parks. Check the outfits who import large machinery.  They have huge , often odd shape pallets, out of heavy duty 4x8 & 8x10 lumber.
 
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I can only work with the cards I am dealt with so this is a SPECULATIVE proposal
for the future me. I have lots of discarded umbrellas. The ribs and handle are
the weak spots but the fabric is still good and WATERPROOF. Sewn together, it
would make a decent roof. I have lots of discarded 3/4 inch tubing. If I heat the
tips then smash them flat, I can drill holes in them and screw together some
kind of geodesic frame. I haven't figured how to anchor this because the storms
are really powerful with rain driven at 45 degrees. Umbrellas won't help and
your pants will be soaking wet until the knees or even higher. Just yesterday
a window pane over a bucket solar dehydrator was blown unto the road. It
is now crushed glass.
 
Posts: 29
Location: Wasilla, United States
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This looks incredible. We use recycled pallets for all kinds of projects. My greenhouse, the fence around the pig pen and after seeing this...Possibly a chicken Yurt. Need a couple new coops this year. This may be just the thing. Can't wait to show hubby in the morning. Thank you for sharing.
 
Posts: 83
Location: Manitoulin Island - in the middle of Lake Huron .Mindemoya,Ontario- Canadian zone 5
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I really like this idea.  The one change I would make if I build one of these myself  (an idea I am seriously considering)  is that I would make the roof out of round cedar poles, of which I have an abundance.      
                                                                                                     
I  would place them tipi style, which will naturally create a smoke  hole. I would use metal straps screwed in place along with a few very  long screws to attach these poles to the top of the pallets.

Tall, good quality pallets like in your picture are indeed very hard to come by in my remote rural location, but I can source lots of 4 foot high pallets, so maybe I will make more of a tipi/yurt hybrid. This would still give more usable head space room inside.

As I am thinking of making this to house interns on my farm in the summer, I plan on placing the structure on a wooden platform built with simple concrete blocks on the ground as a foundation.  This will keep them dry and give them a bit of a mini patio to sit on when the sun is out.
 
Vickey McDonald
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One thing my husband pointed out was that for our location the roof ring being toe nailed together would not work. Our snow loads are much to heavy for this option. Will need to explore more sturdy options.
 
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Yurts are cool. This design looks simple and ideal for our sheep or chickens, as we expand the flocks.
 
Equally good for guests staying a small time, and keeping their plans on track... a small time : )
 
gardener
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I happen to belong to a bike coop, mostly for the gardening and the cool scrap.
I've been messing around with the rims for a couple of years now, looking for ways to reuse them.
I think they would make nice smoke holes, and they are strong enough to be through bolted.
A 16" rim at the very top could be followed with a second 29" rim beneath that.
I think such double construction would be very strong.
You could add more rims between each of the roof poles, for more strength.
You could even cut one into the face of one of the pallets as a window frame.

If I was using metal conduit for the roof poles, I might smash the ends flat to form the connection, but I think it would lose a lot of strength at that point.
An alternative would be to run wire, cable or paracord run through the center of the pole, through a hole in rim of the smoke ring and back through the pole to the bottom end where it could be twisted or tied onto the top of the yurt wall.
This could provide strong inexpensive joint that was only flexible where you wanted it to be.
We could connect the walls of the yurt to each other with hinges, wire, bits of car tire, plywood gussets or some combination of these.
I prefer T25 drive deck screws for almost all construction, because they are durable, easy to drive and relatively easy to remove.
 
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You need to run a cable on or near the end of your roof boards. notch the boards or drill holes near the end. If you don't the roof will push out and collapse.

William Bronson wrote:
I've been messing around with the rims for a couple of years now, looking for ways to reuse them.
I think they would make nice smoke holes, and they are strong enough to be through bolted.


Yea, bike rims work for a center hub. This is my hub on a 15 foot yurt. I wanted to mount a small wind turbine on the shaft but never got around to it. I built it to take to festivals. It's been to Bonnaroo, Burning Man and a bunch of other festivals. My son commandeered the yurt and has been living in it off and on for the last 16 years.

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He loves you so much! And I'm baking the cake! I'm going to put this tiny ad in the cake:
HARDY FRUIT TREES FOR ORGANIC AND PERMACULTURE
https://permies.com/t/132540/HARDY-FRUIT-TREES-ORGANIC-PERMACULTURE
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