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Guerrilla gardening suggestions

 
pioneer
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Location: New Jersey, USA
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The landlord of our local strip mall has removed all the trees and bushes and replaced them with plastic mulch. Whoopee - just what New Jersey needs, more unobstructed views of massive concrete carparks. I'm guessing the one off cost of removal far outweighed the cost of paying a bunch of people to turn up once a month, trim the vegetaion and blow leaves around for an hour or two. I noticed today that nature is fighting back and some of my 'favourite' invasives have already taken hold. I'm not invested in this neighbourhood and I'll be somewhere else this time next year. I do however cycle past the mall twice a day, so would like to do something constructive. I was thinking of fast growing, local, wild flowers that can be grown from seed and self seed. It's next to a stroad and the concrete raises the temperature. There is a good layer of 'mulch'. Any suggestions? There's a vacant lot next door which is head high in flowering Japanses Knotweed, so the race may already be lost.

 
pioneer
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Location: SF Bay, California Zone 10b
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In my experience, the biggest threat to guerilla gardening is routine landscape maintenance. Workers don't go through the plants they see and only remove the nasty ones, they just cut everything down to concrete and move along. I'm guessing that they'll still be coming along every once in a while to remove weeds, at a reduced rate.

I've planted in areas which were then clearcut with a weed whacker. I've since switched to planting in places that don't see as much maintenance - that way the only threat is nature.

One form of guerilla gardening that I've found more effective is planting fungi. For example, I found an area where workers have been dumping wood chips for a long time, creating a huge pile. I planted a bunch of wine cap spawn into it to help the wood chips break down. Since mushrooms do most of their growth underground, I don't have to worry about someone chopping it down.
 
Edward Norton
pioneer
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Location: New Jersey, USA
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They’ve solved the weed problem - everything is dead. I’m guessing they’ve opted for the nuclear option and blasted everywhere with some toxic gunk. It’s right next to the town river which will now be even more polluted. Oh joy . . . Not a good start to the day.

Thank you Malek. Alas not even the fungi solution will work as they’re using rubber / plastic mulch and chemicals. Good advice though and I have my own winecap bed so plenty of material to get somewhere started.
 
gardener
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Location: Eilean a' Cheo
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I suppose the only option in a situation like this is to be pre-emptive. To spot a guerilla gardening opportunity {roundabout, kerb strip} and get in there before they reach for the poison. It maybe that they would have welcomed a wildlife friendly edible garden managed by someone else....I guess insurance and litigation fears stop arrangements like that.
 
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planting Concord grapes along fence lines could provide you with buckets full of wine in years to come
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