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Another list of dynamic accumulators and the minerals they are said to accumulate  RSS feed

 
Andrew James
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I went through a bunch of intronet sources. This is what I found:

Alfalfa: N, Fe
Apples: K
Arrowroot: Ca
Azolla: N
Bamboo: SiO2
Basswood: P, Ca, Mg
Beeches: K
Beeches, European: K, Ca
Birches: P
Birch, black: K, P, Ca
Bladderwreck: I, Mg, Fe
Borage: SiO2, K
Bracken, Eastern: K, P, Mn, Fe, Cu, Co
Brassicas, perennial: P, S
Bridal Bauer: P
Buckwheat: P
Burdock: Fe
Cabbage: B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, N, K, S, Zn
Calamus: N, K, P
Caragreen: Na, N, Ca
Carraway: P
Carrot leaves: Mg, K
Cattail: N
Chamomile, corn: Ca, K
Chamomile, German: Ca, K, P
Chickweed, common: K, P, Mn
Chicory: Ca, K
Chives: Ca, Na
Cleavers: Na, Ca
Clovers: N, P
Coltsfoot: S, Mg, Ca, K, Fe, Cu
Comfrey: SiO2, N, Mg, Ca, K, Fe
Corn: K
Cornflower: P
Dandelion: Na, SiO2, Mg, Ca, K, P, Fe, Cu
Devil's Bit: I, Mg, Fe
Docks: Ca, K, P, Fe
Dogwood, flowering: K, P, Ca
Dulse: Na, I, Mg, Ca, Fe
Eyebright: S, K
Fat hen: Ca, Fe
Fennel: S, K, Na
Flax, seed: Ca
Garlic: F, S, P
Grasses: N, SiO2
Groundsel: Fe
Hickory: K, Ca
Hickory, shagbark: K, P, Ca
Horsetails: SiO2, Mg, Ca, Fe, Co
Iceland Moss: I
Kelp: Na, I, N, Mg, Ca, Fe
Lamb's Quarter: N, Ca, K, P, Mn
Legumes: N
Licorices: P, N2
Linden: P, Ca
Lemon Balm: P
Locust, black: K, Ca, N2
Lupine: N, P
Maples: K
Maple, sugar: K, Ca
Marigold, flowers: P
Meadow Sweet: Na, S, Mg, Ca, P, Fe
Mistletoe: Mg
Mullein, common: S, Mg, K, Fe
Mustards: S, P
Nettle, stinging: Na, S, N, Ca, K, Fe, Cu
Oak, bark: K
Oak, leaves: Ca
Oak, straw: SiO2
Oak, white: P
Parsley: Mg, Ca, K, Fe
Pecan: K, Ca
Pennycress: Zn
Peppermint: Mg, K
Pigweed, red root: Ca, K, P, Fe
Plantains: SiO2, S, Ca, K, Fe, Cu
Primrose: Mg
Pumpkin: K
Purslane: Ca, P, Fe
Rattan Palms: S, K, P
Salad burnet: Fe
Sanicle: K
Sarsaparilla: I
Savory: P
Scarlet pimpernel: Ca
Sheperd's purse: Na, S, Ca
Silverweed: K, Ca, Cu
Skunk Cabbage: Mg
Sorghum: K
Sorrel: Na, Ca, P
Sow thistle: Mg, K, Cu
Spurges: B
Squash: K
Strawberry leaves: Fe
Sugarcane: K
Sunflower: P
Tansy: K
Thistle, Canada: Fe
Thislte, creeping: Ca, K, Fe
Thistle, nodding: Fe
Thistle, Russian: Fe
Toadflax: Mg, Ca, Fe
Tobacco, stems/stalk: N
Two-grooved Milk Vetch: Se
Valerian: SiO2
Vetches: N, K, P, Cu, Co
Violets: P
Walnut: K, P
Walnut, black: K, P, Ca
Water Hyacinth: Cu
Watercress: Na, F, S, Mg, Ca, K, P, Fe
Willow, bark: Mg
Willow, black: Na
Wintergreen: Mg
Yarrow: N, K, P, Cu

I seen Daikon listen somewhere, but no element tied to it.

B- Boron
Ca- Calcium
Co- Cobalt
Cr- Chromium
Cu- Copper
F- Fluorine
Fe- Iron
I- Iodine
K- Potassium
Mg- Magnesium
Mn- Manganese
Na- Sodium
P- Phosphorous
S- Sulfur
Se- Selenium
SiO2- Silica
Zn- Zinc
 
Andrew James
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Cannabis: K, SiO2

I think I seen Cannabis at 10:10 of the Josef Holzer video Paul recently emailed out to us.
 
Andrew James
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Is it Dandelion vs Watercress in the Dynamic Accumulator Heavyweight Title fight?
 
Jesse Biggs
gardener
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This is a good list. I like the thread. How about Chia? Apparently it accumulates Ca, P, Mg, Mn, Cu, Fe, Mo (Molybdenum), Zn, and Sr (Strontium) as well as niacin.
 
Billy Nelson
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Andrew James wrote:Cannabis: K, SiO2

I think I seen Cannabis at 10:10 of the Josef Holzer video Paul recently emailed out to us.


Obviously he would have been growing cannabis to satisfy innocent scientific curiosity.
 
Kevin Swanson
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Andrew James wrote:Cannabis: K, SiO2

I think I seen Cannabis at 10:10 of the Josef Holzer video Paul recently emailed out to us.


I noticed it many a time in this video.
 
Judith Browning
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Andrew James wrote:I went through a bunch of intronet sources. This is what I found:

Alfalfa: N, Fe
Apples: K
Arrowroot: Ca
Azolla: N
Bamboo: SiO2
Basswood: P, Ca, Mg
Beeches: K
Beeches, European: K, Ca
Birches: P
Birch, black: K, P, Ca
Bladderwreck: I, Mg, Fe
Borage: SiO2, K
Bracken, Eastern: K, P, Mn, Fe, Cu, Co
Brassicas, perennial: P, S
Bridal Bauer: P
Buckwheat: P
Burdock: Fe
Cabbage: B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, N, K, S, Zn
Calamus: N, K, P
Caragreen: Na, N, Ca
Carraway: P
Carrot leaves: Mg, K
Cattail: N
Chamomile, corn: Ca, K
Chamomile, German: Ca, K, P
Chickweed, common: K, P, Mn
Chicory: Ca, K
Chives: Ca, Na
Cleavers: Na, Ca
Clovers: N, P
Coltsfoot: S, Mg, Ca, K, Fe, Cu
Comfrey: SiO2, N, Mg, Ca, K, Fe
Corn: K
Cornflower: P
Dandelion: Na, SiO2, Mg, Ca, K, P, Fe, Cu
Devil's Bit: I, Mg, Fe
Docks: Ca, K, P, Fe
Dogwood, flowering: K, P, Ca
Dulse: Na, I, Mg, Ca, Fe
Eyebright: S, K
Fat hen: Ca, Fe
Fennel: S, K, Na
Flax, seed: Ca
Garlic: F, S, P
Grasses: N, SiO2
Groundsel: Fe
Hickory: K, Ca
Hickory, shagbark: K, P, Ca
Horsetails: SiO2, Mg, Ca, Fe, Co
Iceland Moss: I
Kelp: Na, I, N, Mg, Ca, Fe
Lamb's Quarter: N, Ca, K, P, Mn
Legumes: N
Licorices: P, N2
Linden: P, Ca
Lemon Balm: P
Locust, black: K, Ca, N2
Lupine: N, P
Maples: K
Maple, sugar: K, Ca
Marigold, flowers: P
Meadow Sweet: Na, S, Mg, Ca, P, Fe
Mistletoe: Mg
Mullein, common: S, Mg, K, Fe
Mustards: S, P
Nettle, stinging: Na, S, N, Ca, K, Fe, Cu
Oak, bark: K
Oak, leaves: Ca
Oak, straw: SiO2
Oak, white: P
Parsley: Mg, Ca, K, Fe
Pecan: K, Ca
Pennycress: Zn
Peppermint: Mg, K
Pigweed, red root: Ca, K, P, Fe
Plantains: SiO2, S, Ca, K, Fe, Cu
Primrose: Mg
Pumpkin: K
Purslane: Ca, P, Fe
Rattan Palms: S, K, P
Salad burnet: Fe
Sanicle: K
Sarsaparilla: I
Savory: P
Scarlet pimpernel: Ca
Sheperd's purse: Na, S, Ca
Silverweed: K, Ca, Cu
Skunk Cabbage: Mg
Sorghum: K
Sorrel: Na, Ca, P
Sow thistle: Mg, K, Cu
Spurges: B
Squash: K
Strawberry leaves: Fe
Sugarcane: K
Sunflower: P
Tansy: K
Thistle, Canada: Fe
Thislte, creeping: Ca, K, Fe
Thistle, nodding: Fe
Thistle, Russian: Fe
Toadflax: Mg, Ca, Fe
Tobacco, stems/stalk: N
Two-grooved Milk Vetch: Se
Valerian: SiO2
Vetches: N, K, P, Cu, Co
Violets: P
Walnut: K, P
Walnut, black: K, P, Ca
Water Hyacinth: Cu
Watercress: Na, F, S, Mg, Ca, K, P, Fe
Willow, bark: Mg
Willow, black: Na
Wintergreen: Mg
Yarrow: N, K, P, Cu

I seen Daikon listen somewhere, but no element tied to it.

B- Boron
Ca- Calcium
Co- Cobalt
Cr- Chromium
Cu- Copper
F- Fluorine
Fe- Iron
I- Iodine
K- Potassium
Mg- Magnesium
Mn- Manganese
Na- Sodium
P- Phosphorous
S- Sulfur
Se- Selenium
SiO2- Silica
Zn- Zinc





This seems like a good list. Several plants look like important accumulators...I need to print out and start my wish list.
 
Paul Gutches
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Location: Taos, New Mexico
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Awesome list Andrew.

Thanks for the post.

It would be great to build a list of plants with specific outscale nutrient needs that could assist in building guilds based in part on the providers.

Does anyone have a link to such a resource?

I believe there may be a list like that somewhere in gaia's garden.

Will need to see if it's in there.

 
Deja Wolfe
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Location: Clinton, MT
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Does anyone know of a dynamic accumulator that has a similar root system to Mullein? We are wanting something that will help break up and improve hard soil. Any ideas or suggestions are greatly appreciated! Thank you!
 
Angelika Maier
pollinator
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There's an article about the lack of scientific backup for dynamic accumulators: https://permaculturenews.org/2015/04/10/the-facts-about-dynamic-accumulators/
what do you think?
 
Marco Banks
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In the past year, I've heard several different people challenging the orthodoxy of the dynamic accumulator "common" wisdom.  All of them have stated that no research has proven the veracity of the claims given to the wonders of comfrey or other dynamic accumulators.  That's quite something, as you would think that someone somewhere would have taken this on as a research topic.

What we do know:  various plants accumulate various nutrients and minerals in greater or lesser degrees.  The list at the start of this thread is a legitimate list.  What is not clear is whether or not the decomposition of those plants automatically makes those nutrients available to the plants around them.  We all have our own experience and personal observations  . . . but that's not a substitute for hard research.

What we do know, 2:  Decomposing carbon life forms (big piles of comfrey leaves, squirrels that try to steal my avocados, chop-and-drop cover crops, dead mafia gangsters . . .) feed the soil food web and bring tremendous fertility.  When in doubt, add carbon --- just pile it on the soil surface and let the magic begin.  So, for those of us growing comfrey or letting a dandelion grow to maturity before pulling it out, any living root in the ground is a good thing, and then dropping that once living plant at the base of another plant to decompose is double good.

It would stand to reason that a tree is cycling nutrients up from the deep soil to its leaves.  Those leaves drop to the ground, decompose, feed the bacteria and fungi, and in turn get cycled right back up to the top of the tree again.  Trees are the ultimate dynamic accumulators.

This sounds like a great Ph.D. research topic.
 
Alexandra Clark
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As a student of biology I always have a good giggle at the idea that there is a "lack of scientific research" on a subject.

First, most modern research is ONLY undertaken if there is good funding. Where does that funding generally come from? Who does the research serve.

Second, if there is a commercial product that "contradicts" a free, non-patent applicable option, there will be plenty of research supporting the veracity of the commercial product and very little or no research into the free unpatented option. This is purposeful. No funding will be provided for grants to those who want to look into the opposition of a commercial product.

Take the case of hemp/cannabis. Almost no research was done to support the anecdotal medical evidence, even though prior to its prohibition in the US it was widely used in many medicines and by many physicians.  The reason for cannabis prohibition had nothing to do with medicine and everything to do with Hearst company pulp paper holdings. With the advent of the mechanical decorticator machine hemp fiber was going to get really cheap--and Hearst had pulp holdings and newspapers to spread propaganda.

Now there is more research because there are a number of states where companies can make money with cannabis. Interesting.

Why would there be no research into dynamic accumulators? Well, their use would threaten the interests of the modern fertilizer industry.

So, no funding goes to that research.

Grants and scholarships same thing. At our local horticulture school there is plenty of merit money from Scotts for horticulture students--they just have to be majoring in turf management....

Do dynamic accumulators work? Yes they do, because the biome web of soil works. As stated above--if you put a decaying item on the soil--it will be recycled. If your soil is full of life and mychozae it will recycle the nutrients to the plants. Thats how the web of soil and plants works.

Great list--love that most of the weeds in my garden that are chop and dropped are on that list and full of nutrients...but as a wild forager, I already knew they were.
 
Larisa Walk
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As a long-time student of the soil I'd have to say I agree that there has been little actual controlled research on the practical use of plant accumulation. Over the years that I've done soil consults with farmers (since 1986) I've seen before and after soil tests on fields where it was attempted and the results were pretty insignificant. In my work I normally recommend applying the needed, purchased, shipped-in mineral elements in quantities necessary to bring that specific soil into the correct biological and textural balance, all accomplished within one to three growing seasons, depending on how far "out of whack" the soil starts. The results have been predictably positive in terms of plants health, reproduction, and yield as well as ease of tillage. I also agree that just keeping a vegetative cover on a soil is a primary goal, whether you think of it as a carbon source, a mineral source, or just shade and compaction-proofing. Biology will really work with you if you do. You can see what I rely on for soil balance theory on this page: http://geopathfinder.com/Soil-Fertility-Nutrition.html
 
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