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Trifoliate Orange as a hedge?

 
Elizabeth Bowers
Posts: 12
Location: Southwestern Pennsylvania
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Hello,

I'v been looking into growing some hedges as fences and some for privacy. A friend mentioned Trifoliate Orange or "Flying Dragon". What is it exactly? And what can it be used for? Will it take over open fields or yards? Sorry for all the questions, i'm just curious. Thank you!
 
leila hamaya
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Location: northern northern california
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i havent grown it but i have read about it. and thought about growing it...

it is extremely hardy kind of orange/ citrus, and can grow in cold climates. people say that the fruit isnt edible, or rather that it isnt pleasant tasting, but i tend to wonder about that because i have a wider sense of whats edible than most !??!

perhaps it just has an unusual and bitter taste, it may be able to made into something good by processing? thats what i think.

its also used as root stock for other oranges, because it is so hardy.
so people graft a sweet cultivated orange variety onto flying dragon rootstock, to grow citrus in colder regions.

here's some info

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs221

i have also been wanting to plant some of these and see what they are like.

but maybe i would rather just try experimentally some satsumas, or other kind of cold hardy citrus instead.
 
S Bengi
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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I have flying dragon growing in boston, ma.
It is in the citrus family originating in asian. It is used as a spice there.
In fact I have bought adobe seasoning salt with "bitter orange".
I have also heard of it being used to make jam.

The one I have seems to grow really slowly.
But it would make an effective hedge plant.

 
Judith Browning
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I grew trifoliate orange for awhile and then cut it all back out. Mine grew fairly fast ...above head hieght in two years and big long thorns all of the way to the ground...probably both good reasons to grow it as a hedge. I just thought it looked dangerous with young kids running around. My friend grows them and makes a wonderful marmalade with the fruit. They propagate easily from seed here but are not that hard to cut back to control spread. If it wasnt for the thorns I probably would have kept them. They are a beautiful green color...branches and all with a lemon size and color fruit.
 
Alder Burns
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Trifoliate is a traditional hedge plant, at least in the South. I think it might be kind of overkill if mere privacy is your goal. One old book I recall boasted that a good trifoliate hedge would even keep a bull in!
 
Elizabeth Bowers
Posts: 12
Location: Southwestern Pennsylvania
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Really that is cool. I was thinking about using it to keep the livestock out of my yard. They've been a nightmare this year even when using electric fencing. And lately we've been having a bear nusence problem, and it has me greatly concerned, so if it will keep a bull in hopefully it will keep a bear out.
I will continue reading up more about it. Thank you!
 
David Good
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I've seen a great big one here in Florida. Mean as heck, and the fruit are sour/bitter to an amazing degree. I have a baby in my front yard from where I transplanted an orange. Apparently, a bit of rootstock was left behind - and up came a little trifoliate orange. They really are pretty trees.

Another hedge plant you might consider: osage orange. Not related, and you won't get edible fruit, but they're great tough trees with lovely wood.
 
Elizabeth Bowers
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Location: Southwestern Pennsylvania
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David Goodman, I heard that Osage Orange has a nasty way of taking over fields and open spaces. And can be a nightmare to get rid of. I was considering it for a while, and it's still an option.

Thank you!
 
Marsha Richardson
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Hardy orange makes a magnificent hedge and will keep out bears and just about anything else. My sister calls hers the hedge of death. Black Dragon is a variety that has thorns that are even MORE fierce than the regular species - three inches of curved sharpness. These plants are super easy to propogate, just plant the "oranges" and wait. That seems to work better than planting individual seeds. They will germinate into a clump of little seedlings. Just separate and plant them out. They do very well crowded together to make an impermiable hedge and can be pruned with no problem. Do be careful where you put the prunings though - the thorns can go through a shoe. I like to pile them into a sort of mulch pile around my chicken pens to provide bears with a little treat if they decide to approach it. Also works for dogs, mine has learned to avoid that part of the yard. Once they get large they do not transplant very well so put the little seedlings where you want your hedge to be. Mulch well and enjoy. The flowers in the spring are wonderful and the birds love nesting inside the larger plants because it has great support for nests and no mammals can get into them. I have them pop up here and there because I forgot I had planted them -- always a fun surprise.
 
Miles Flansburg
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David Livingston
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Anyone got any seeds they would be willing to send me in return for ? ...........
I live in France and love marmalade but the bitter sevile oranges used traditionally to make English and scottish marmalade will not grow here

David
 
Marianne Cicala
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Osage orange makes an incredible thorny hedge that animals won't attempt to go through. I know at Monticello, Jefferson used it, Washington did as well at Mt. Vernon. Apparently very easy (with thick gloves) to bend the canes over & stick a rock on it and let it root. I have not heard of it taking over a field, but then again I have visited both places and the memoirs about their farms were written by these 2 owners who clearly weren't doing the hands on farming.
 
Sam White
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David Livingston wrote:Anyone got any seeds they would be willing to send me in return for ? ...........
I live in France and love marmalade but the bitter sevile oranges used traditionally to make English and scottish marmalade will not grow here

David


Hi David,

Chiltern Seeds sell bitter orange seeds here in the UK - £4 for 16 seeds plus £3 delivery to mainland Europe. Might buy some myself now I've found them for sale! Been meaning to for a while now.
 
Matt Ferrall
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Location: Western WA,usda zone 6/7,80inches of rain,250feet elevation
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'flying dragon'is an ornamental contorted variety of trifoliate orange(un related to osage orange).The seeds of trifoliate orange are available through JL Hudson and seedlings are far more vigorous than the variety.They have done well for me here in the Pacific NW albeit no fruit has ever appeared.I get 80inches of rain but they are protected under the eves.They would make excelent fencing once established.Barberries work for this as well.
 
Elizabeth Bowers
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Location: Southwestern Pennsylvania
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Thank you everyone!! Sorry i haven't been on much to reply, i'v been busy researching heirloom plants, and purple vegetables.
Wow, i'm really starting to like Trifoliate Orange.
WOW Marsha, you know so much about it, where are you located at? I'm beginning to see a lot more possibilities with it than i thought. Great idea for around your chicken coop, we've been having predator problems with ours lately.
Miles, i'll be sure to check into the link you shared.
This is great honestly, i'm beginning to feel much better about a nice natural living fence. And yes bears are a big problem where i live, lately they have been coming right up to my father in laws house!
Thank you so much everyone!
 
Cris Bessette
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Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
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Trifoliate orange plants are one of my favorites.

I grew some about 4 years ago from seed I got on the internet, then I found a grown, fruiting tree in the middle of the town where I live.

I've tasted a few of the fruit from time to time when they ripen in the late fall. They continue to taste pretty nasty each time.



Right now I have about twenty or more of these on my property, all four years old or less.

I am trying to grow a hedge of them in the middle of the yard.

I also have some citrangequat plants, which are part trifoliate orange. (but supposedly much better tasting fruit.)

 
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