• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Best place in California to live off the grid?

 
Meredith Kirby
Posts: 1
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love california. It has everything. Mountains, beaches, lakes, rivers, desert, etc. It's home to me now and where I want to live. I'm considering buying a plot of land sometime in the next year or two (probably 5-20 acres), and I'm trying to figure out what the best place to do it in would be. Most likely I want a plot of empty land with a well or stream that I could build a small house on, plant a garden, set up solar/hydro/wind, and live independently. I know the laws vary from county to county on what is allowed (i.e. rainwater harvesting, composting toilets, natural building, etc) and how difficult it is to get permits to build things and utilize resources. I will not buy land that does not have a water source on it, that's the most important thing to me. I know every property should be legally investigated before purchasing (easements and such). Any suggestions for which counties to start my search in?
 
Adam Klaus
author
gardener
Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
65
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
oregon?
 
Zachary Morris
Posts: 28
Location: Southern Oregon, 6a/6b
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most of what I see in California is Permaculture education, not home scale permaculture.

I grew up in, and still work in California, I spent more than 5 years searching out an affordable area to off grid and I found none that suited me. My findings were that you need one of two things; 1) A VERY large sum of money. (2) A willingness to live in the desert.

If you don't have one of those two things then the likeliness of finding suitable land in California is extremely unlikely. For your minimum 5 acres with a well (No old growth, previous abusive land owners etc. expected) and something besides absolute bare dirt you'll already be well into the 100k range, keeping in mind of course that you'll need as much as triple that to then develop 5 acres into a livable homestead. If you've got lots of money and want to join the rest of the wealthy permaculturists then head up to El Dorado, Nevada, Placer and Lake counties, or a little further north to the humboldt area.

Again keep in mind that you're looking at some of the most expensive semi-rural land in the world to try to live what's inherently a humble life, one of a permaculturist. I would urge you to consider other areas.


Adam's suggestion is mine as well, look into Oregon. It has everything that California has minus the land prices and over population. I'm currently setting up my own homestead there.
 
James Colbert
Posts: 271
9
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am not sure where the above two posters have been looking for land but I have found plenty of land for reasonable prices that is not desert. That being said you can get a lot of desert land in Cali for cheap. By reasonable prices on the none desert land I mean 1 - 2k per acre. Check out "landwatch" the site allows you to narrow down your search by property size, price, and county. Everynow and then you will see a 20 acre property for 40k.

Here is one in Lassen: http://www.landwatch.com/Lassen-County-California-Land-for-sale/pid/200468566

another http://www.landwatch.com/Lassen-County-California-Land-for-sale/pid/289002716

This is after 2 minutes of looking. California land is expensive but there are deals especially if you don't mind going up north or down south lol. Seriously consider the desert land I believe that there is a thriving permaculture community in Joshua Tree and prices around that area are reasonable. I am thinking of buying up some desert land and rehabing it into an oasis over a few years before actually living on the property.

 
Zachary Morris
Posts: 28
Location: Southern Oregon, 6a/6b
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
James Colbert wrote:I am not sure where the above two posters have been looking for land but I have found plenty of land for reasonable prices that is not desert. That being said you can get a lot of desert land in Cali for cheap. By reasonable prices on the none desert land I mean 1 - 2k per acre. Check out "landwatch" the site allows you to narrow down your search by property size, price, and county. Everynow and then you will see a 20 acre property for 40k.

Here is one in Lassen: http://www.landwatch.com/Lassen-County-California-Land-for-sale/pid/200468566

another http://www.landwatch.com/Lassen-County-California-Land-for-sale/pid/289002716

This is after 2 minutes of looking. California land is expensive but there are deals especially if you don't mind going up north or down south lol. Seriously consider the desert land I believe that there is a thriving permaculture community in Joshua Tree and prices around that area are reasonable. I am thinking of buying up some desert land and rehabing it into an oasis over a few years before actually living on the property.



You've neglected her one key requirement which is water. Sure you can buy 20 acres for 40k in California, and it'll have 4x4 access, be within 2" of average rainfall of being classified high desert, and it'll have no well, with the water table often more than 300' deep. If you're going to go all the way up to Lassen you you might as well just go to Oregon anyways. I used landwatch to identify suitable areas but as far as actually buying land through it I don't recommend it.
 
James Colbert
Posts: 271
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The above examples are just what I was able to find in a couple minutes of searching. I have nothing against Oregon, seems like a very laid back California, as if northern Cali just keeps going and gets more full of hippies the more you go north lol. I do agree with you that you should not buy land off landwatch site unseen but if the land fits your needs and price range and you have seen the property I see no problem with it. If you buy land with some elevation change water should not be an issue after some work admittedly. I would go in do some earthworks, plant trees and allow the soil hydrology to reestablish itself. Digging a well may be necessary in some situations but that can be done creativity as well (no pun intended) I have seen people dig wells pretty deep by hand if cost is an issue. All of this goes it to ones decision. If you love to live in Cali you can make it work for a reasonable amount of money you just need to be creative and keep your eyes open for good deals. If you don't care about living in Cali it will be easier on your wallet for sure but you may not have the market for your produce or farm products, if you decide to farm products. That is kinda a bonus for living in Cali, large population, with a lot of liberal health conscious people. Honestly though you can be successful anywhere with some hard work and forethought.
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1117
Location: northern northern california
65
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
^^^^^^
yeah this is true, its really very expensive in most places, and oregon might actually be the best place to live in california!
southern oregon is actually just like northern california, but without the hype and without the cost...its the same bioregion though, same kinds of trees, same conditions as the most northern part of california.

theres also a lot of weird things that happen here, its like a bubble, really, theres no where with similar issues and ways. it feels like a different country than america....

most people who live here do not seek regular employment, and theres not much to be had any way, whether they are trust funded, grow pot, made their money elsewhere and then moved here....or theres some people who have some independant businesses and crafters and artists. just in the time i have lived here it has gotten much more expensive, and the kinds of people who have been moving here have changed, so its become much more conservative in the time i have been here. its still pretty much freak central though =)
but previous to it becoming freak central, it was actually very conservative with a lot of loggers, and of course theres the history of the miners.

i have lived here for over ten years now, in the most northern part of california and somehow just keep managing to inch along and find situations...in small cabins, cheap rentals, work trade...theres some of this to be found here and some communities too. there arent a lot of situations like this though, or the ones that are here are usually rather closed, or the situations are just weird and off balance, ime.
again theres TONS of pot growers, and the issues that this creates for communities are mighty strange and IMO not very healthy for the larger community. i personally dont mind people who grow a small amount respectfully, but that isnt really what most people are doing, though...there are some people out here who are into growing food, some CSAs and farms- there are definitely people outside of that world- but its pretty epic and strange if you are not used to it! its also made the real estate, rentals and land prices, and especially the economy, weirder.

i personally do not want to live in the desert, but yeah i guess its true theres some desert like land with nothing on it for cheap in some spots.

the best places i have found in northern california, as long as you like being in really remote location and isolated, "middle of no where", is trinity, shasta, and siskiyou counties. theres some cool areas around shasta, and this is one place where theres desirable land for not as much money, like near weaverville and hayfork, and other places like dunsmuir.

futher up north in the remote parts of trinity and siskiyou there used to be more inexpensive situations, i knew some folks years ago who had extremely cheap cabins, very rustic. and not many years ago heard about people buying raw land for much cheaper, incredibly cheap. i suppose it helps to know people, you have to get to know the people and you can find deals. theres a few good networks of people who are involved in the department of fish and game, and wildlife kinds of work, this is one way people network into the communities.... because if you are qualified you can get paid work in this way and get to know people. people will sometimes also hire you to do clearing brush and tree work here...odd jobs and this is actually the only kinds of jobs you can get, at least in the really remote parts.

but a lot of the communities are somewhat closed, so it takes a while to make good connections. the best people hide out in the hills and hardly never come to town ....but if you can hook up with something more like owner contracts, or meeting some folks who will sell you some of their land (which is actually hard here because its hard to subdivide land here)...but if you can hook up with something like that you can still sometimes find affordable land...or situations where you can caretake or work on land for people, make some kind of owner contract, and live in a rustic cabin.

though even these areas have gone way up in price, but its truly the middle of no where with no stores, no services of any kind, no gas stations etc. like hours of driving on crazy dirt mountain roads to get to even a small store, kind of remote. most land here has rivers and streams on it, you cant hardly walk very far without bumping into a huge river.

as far as whatever legal issues, i think everywhere here has fairly strict requirements, theres also a lot of weird things here with all that throughout all of california. theres certainly people who do unpermitted things all over, and you can somewhat get away with a lot just because people dont care to notice...and because its considered more acceptable to do alternative things. alternative things are basically the norm here. =)
and if you are willing to jump through the hoops, its probably more possible to get alternative systems seen as legit.

but technically it is fairly strict, you need permits, etc, and actually theres a lot of weirdness with this, so be careful if you are going to buy cheap land. a lot of it is flood plain, in some places you cant drill wells, etc...
 
Zachary Morris
Posts: 28
Location: Southern Oregon, 6a/6b
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
leila hamaya wrote:^^^^^^
yeah this is true, its really very expensive in most places, and oregon might actually be the best place to live in california!
southern oregon is actually just like northern california, but without the hype and without the cost...its the same bioregion though, same kinds of trees, same conditions as the most northern part of california.

theres also a lot of weird things that happen here, its like a bubble, really, theres no where with similar issues and ways. it feels like a different country than america....

most people who live here do not seek regular employment, and theres not much to be had any way, whether they are trust funded, grow pot, made their money elsewhere and then moved here....or theres some people who have some independant businesses and crafters and artists. just in the time i have lived here it has gotten much more expensive, and the kinds of people who have been moving here have changed, so its become much more conservative in the time i have been here. its still pretty much freak central though =)
but previous to it becoming freak central, it was actually very conservative with a lot of loggers, and of course theres the history of the miners.

i have lived here for over ten years now, in the most northern part of california and somehow just keep managing to inch along and find situations...in small cabins, cheap rentals, work trade...theres some of this to be found here and some communities too. there arent a lot of situations like this though, or the ones that are here are usually rather closed, or the situations are just weird and off balance, ime.
again theres TONS of pot growers, and the issues that this creates for communities are mighty strange and IMO not very healthy for the larger community. i personally dont mind people who grow a small amount respectfully, but that isnt really what most people are doing, though...there are some people out here who are into growing food, some CSAs and farms- there are definitely people outside of that world- but its pretty epic and strange if you are not used to it! its also made the real estate, rentals and land prices, and especially the economy, weirder.

i personally do not want to live in the desert, but yeah i guess its true theres some desert like land with nothing on it for cheap in some spots.

the best places i have found in northern california, as long as you like being in really remote location and isolated, "middle of no where", is trinity, shasta, and siskiyou counties. theres some cool areas around shasta, and this is one place where theres desirable land for not as much money, like near weaverville and hayfork, and other places like dunsmuir.

futher up north in the remote parts of trinity and siskiyou there used to be more inexpensive situations, i knew some folks years ago who had extremely cheap cabins, very rustic. and not many years ago heard about people buying raw land for much cheaper, incredibly cheap. i suppose it helps to know people, you have to get to know the people and you can find deals. theres a few good networks of people who are involved in the department of fish and game, and wildlife kinds of work, this is one way people network into the communities.... because if you are qualified you can get paid work in this way and get to know people. people will sometimes also hire you to do clearing brush and tree work here...odd jobs and this is actually the only kinds of jobs you can get, at least in the really remote parts.

but a lot of the communities are somewhat closed, so it takes a while to make good connections. the best people hide out in the hills and hardly never come to town ....but if you can hook up with something more like owner contracts, or meeting some folks who will sell you some of their land (which is actually hard here because its hard to subdivide land here)...but if you can hook up with something like that you can still sometimes find affordable land...or situations where you can caretake or work on land for people, make some kind of owner contract, and live in a rustic cabin.

though even these areas have gone way up in price, but its truly the middle of no where with no stores, no services of any kind, no gas stations etc. like hours of driving on crazy dirt mountain roads to get to even a small store, kind of remote. most land here has rivers and streams on it, you cant hardly walk very far without bumping into a huge river.

as far as whatever legal issues, i think everywhere here has fairly strict requirements, theres also a lot of weird things here with all that throughout all of california. theres certainly people who do unpermitted things all over, and you can somewhat get away with a lot just because people dont care to notice...and because its considered more acceptable to do alternative things. alternative things are basically the norm here. =)
and if you are willing to jump through the hoops, its probably more possible to get alternative systems seen as legit.

but technically it is fairly strict, you need permits, etc, and actually theres a lot of weirdness with this, so be careful if you are going to buy cheap land. a lot of it is flood plain, in some places you cant drill wells, etc...



Everything I read here I agree with like 99%, the one thing I'd like to note because of that, is that Oregon has so many fewer pot growers it's incredible. Where I grew up and work in is small town northern California and a huge portion of the local economy relies HEAVILY on the marijuana industry directly or indirectly.



@ James you should know my property is a very short distance and is in the same bioregion as the properties you recommended, the things you're recommending I'm in the process of doing, however it's worth mentioning that anyone who is doing this with little to no experience as in this case is not likely to have the skills or knowledge required for such projects. Not that they're so difficult to acquire, but they do need to be acquired.
 
David Hartley
Posts: 258
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Though there are some major B.S. issues (like most states) in Oregon; there are also some vary favorable ones. The Farm Direct regulations changed for the better. Making small scale homesteading very possible: http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/FSD/pages/faq_2336.aspx#undefined

I wouldn't shed a single tear if Portland and Salem fell off the map. Politically speaking.
 
Jason Hower
Posts: 8
Location: Jefferson State
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've lived in rural Shasta county and worked all over N.CA for the last few years and would have to agree with the observations mentioned above. While I sympathize with those that would say "skip CA and proceed to OR" (I'll put myself in that category), every choice has compromises. How remote do you care to be, and what is a reasonable sum of money for you? Do you need internet access and/or a cell signal on the property? Oddly enough, sacrificing these things in certain areas doesn’t bring the price of land down very much. There is very affordable land in Shasta and Tehama counties. Some even have springs or creeks, but they’re completely off grid and HOT in the summertime. Yes, Lassen & Modoc counties have very cheap land, but not much precipitation and VERY sparsely populated. Coming from Santa Cruz, you may find that way of life very depressing. None of these are deal breakers, but you’ll find some counties are not fond of issuing permits if you choose to live off grid and harvest rainwater. I know several in Shasta county who have done the bare minimum (well & septic) to be issued a mailing address, and then built a cabin or outbuildings without permits. However, all it takes is one flyover by officials looking for pot grows to rain on your parade. I don’t know if I could sleep well with that kind of risk involved. Also the costs of permits vary wildly from one place to the next. While I consider my permit fees to be outrageous($3-5K), I know some in Redding who have paid the city 3-4 times that amount for the privilege of building a home. I would research your options heavily before you buy – even if you do go to OR!
 
Karen Crane
Posts: 158
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There are lots of cheap places in CA.
OR has VERY restrictive water rights. So watch out.
Check out the ebay listings.
Saw 20 acres WITH a working well , pump and cabin for under $10,000.
Yes on a real road. True a nice distance from stores.
Did have pinion and juniper tress.
There are also many other of the northern counties that have cheap land.
Got to look around. lots of homesteaders in northen CA.
Watch www.zillow.com and www.realtor.com as well as craigslist for ideas.
 
Brian Robertson
Posts: 1
Location: Stanislaus County, California
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There are a lot of good places to live off grid in Central California. I noticed that you live in Santa Cruz. I'm not sure what the prices are like in the Boulder Creek area because I'm not familiar with that area, but it's probably not cheap. Mariposa and Calaveras Counties, and the eastern part of Madera County aren't terribly expensive; Tuolumne County costs a little more. The town of La Grange is probably a good place to check out. It's spread out over three counties: Stanislaus, Tuolumne, and Mariposa. I don't know much about their water resources, but it's rural and isolated without being TOO rural and isolated. The Sierra mountain counties have always been my sanctuary; I absolutely love it up there. Gardens are harder to grow the higher you go up in altitude, though.

One place I've heard of but never visited is the Trinity Alps Preserve, west of Redding. From what I've heard, there's no electricity at all, and all the lots are really large, but most of them seem to be in the $50,000 range.

I hope you find a place you like.
 
Karen Crane
Posts: 158
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most of the counties that were mentioned are rather expensive. ( And have lots of building restrictions.)
I spent almost two years researching northen CA for cheap places to buy property and have off the grid potntial.
OK. Here it is. Below Alturas: Madaline, east of Eagle laker, norht of Susanville, Goose lake area,
There are usually listings on ebay for this area...cheap. Biggest problem always is putting in a well or hauling water.
Very little rainfall.
The around the Sierras land is expensive...sorry. Occasionally you can get a deal though
Where I ended up is the foothills of the Trinity mountians. Off the grid land and not bad pricing.
I ended up with 2 acres with mobile and septic and well way below market as it needed a lot of work.
Could add solar or a biogas generator.
Put in over $30K of work on it and plan to sell. as prices have gone up and my reator says I should ask $70K.
Because of health reasons I am thinking more like $60K cash as is ....still work to be done.
Did also get 4 one acre lots in NM really cheap as well but the cost of a well will stop you.
So my research showed:
California Pines has one and 2 acre lots you can get often on sale on ebay
for not much...they do have an HOA and some restrctions though
north eastern CA ( south of Alturas down the 395 before Susanville)
This is high desert land and check out the price to put in a well. Check ebay for this area.
and the lower Trinity mountian areas ( Rancho Tehama area also cheap...... that is west of the 5 freeway)
Also there are some deals in high desert areas in San Bernardino county area...Barstow area as well as
over east of Palm Springs 21 Palms and those east areas...again water problem though.






 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1117
Location: northern northern california
65
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
^^^^^^^
trinity is awesome =)
i could repeat that i think the weaverville/hayfork area, and the rest of trinity county/siskiyou county is very livable.... and i have researched some land there and found some great deals. which would be great if i had even ANY money to buy something! ah well...i do have some friends who are looking for cheap land and to potentially do a community project, so i have been looking at a lot of land deals in northern cal for them.

but i have enjoyed the times i spent in trinity county, mostly in hayfork area.

so is siskiyou, its my favorite place in northern cal, but theres very little private land, its mostly national forest, and most of it is extremely remote. extremely extremely remote, which is one of the reasons i love it so. i love the sense of being somewhere where no one would come there, and theres tons of this, and abandoned homesteads, beautiful rivers, and tons of amazing places with very little population.

thats where i currently live, though i dont own my own land. i know some folks here though =)
the area around shasta is cool, a little bit more populated, still has water/rivers/rainfall and i see deals for land there that seems doable. heres one i just saw the other day

http://siskiyou.craigslist.org/reo/4169934253.html
$44000 40 acres views of Mt. Shasta - Lease Opt Available (Gazelle, CA)

this is one of the best deals i have seen lately, but its way too far south for my friends. most acreage like this, even raw, is a lot more money, but there are some alternative type deals with owner contracts and such....

heres another on the low end of the price... (trinity)

http://humboldt.craigslist.org/reo/4114334528.html

if i see others maybe i will think of it and post them up....
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
Posts: 1341
Location: northern California
42
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just an observation from someone in CA now 2+ years....it might do to drive through one of the big burn areas a few months after. I dare say one will find people wanting to sell out burned-out homesites cheap.....would be an opportunity for people willing to do the rehab work....and who better than permies!
 
Scott Barnes
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I too have researched a lot of areas. Admittedly I do not intend to live totally away from the big city of la but I do want to get away, have some land, build a small 300 ft dwelling.... I am still researching where in joshua tree and trying to figure out regulations. Solar seems like a no brainier but I would prefer to have electrical on the property. Chemical toilet and water tank. I have also found some areas in Banning. Would love to have a space large enough where others could park their tiny homes, build community raised gardens, etc....


 
David Amos
Posts: 15
Location: Charlotte, Winston-Salem North Carolina
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would think the best would be in Northern California (or Jefferson, I love that idea). I am an attorney that lived in southern California and am currently in the Appalachians of North Carolina. I am very handy man in addition to being adept at navigating the bewildering maze of California regulation. Your area, Santa Cruz is brutally difficult with regard to water rights.
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1117
Location: northern northern california
65
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
well i said i would post here if i saw something cool in a land deal cause i have been browsing. just saw this and felt it was worthy of being shared.

state of jefferson land
http://siskiyou.craigslist.org/reo/4238241311.html

254 acres of Mountain, Forest, and Stream.
Located in Siskiyou County near Ft. Jones and Yreka, the county seat.
County maintained access road along McAdams Creek, which runs through the lands.
Multiple Springs along Lovelady Gulch.
Mutiple Building sites and pads are in, as are roads throughout the lands.

Surrounded on 2 sides by national forest.
Priced between $1,000 to $3,000 per acre, depending on if offer is cash, and if all rights are included.
View lands on-line at the Internet Archives by searching for
"Great Getaways" (lands were featured in a Broadcast Series)
and "Lovelady Gulch".

Small, one room cabin with bed and franklin stove for overnighting.

Lands must be sold as one parcel, but may be subdivided in 80 acre parcels.
 
Stephen Lloyd
Posts: 37
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just wanted to chime in and recommend (or re-recommend) Lake county, CA. Beautiful land, very rural, with some flexibility regarding building and such. Real estate is much more affordable than nearby counties, and there's not much reason for this valuation. Several towns and cities within an hour or two's drive (for farmer's markets, supplies, social activities etc.). Davis, Santa Rosa, Ukiah, Hopland (home of the Solar Living Institute)... The towns in lake county don't have especially much to offer if you are looking for that sort of thing, so it's best to not look for that sort of thing. Some parcels have some issues with water quality (boron and sodium, generally, or low flow) and other parcels are superb with lots of good quality water. Like I said, the towns are what they are, and the rural areas are quiet and feel very remote even if the town is ten minutes away. Clean air, good climate. A hardware store (or hospital) is never too far away--










 
Briana Lyon
Posts: 1
Location: Los Gatos, California
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Never mind all ye naysayers! My husband and I moved to the Santa Cruz mountains from the cheap home-steading bliss of central Kootenay British Columbia for the exceptional ecology and niche habitat here. Along with Permaculture, we also wanted access to the thriving Bay Area economy and the beautiful surf (time to take a lil break from skiing). Life's still a work in progress and yes it doesn't come next-to-free but we're figuring it out.

There is a lot of land with natural water sources (springs, seasonal ponds and creeks) in the Santa Cruz mountains in semi-remote and reasonably affordable locations (Ben lommond, Felton, Aptos, San Lorenzo, even los gatos, etc.). What is not affordable are the architectural and engineering documents required for permits required for structures. If you work with a prefabricated structure that comes with proper plans, additional concerns/costs will be soil engineering reports and plot plans. If you want to build your own structure you will need extensive architectural plans ($$$$ my guess is anywhere from 15-75k for a licensed architect to check all your plans for code and draft appropriately). Good news is the first cob structure was just recently approved/permitted in Santa Cruz county (they required reinforcement with rebar). So maybe you can build first (with some consideration of code) and then update for permitting when necessary after? Don't know the penalties...

We looked at one place with a large seasonal creek that ran through the property, which appeared to have potential -through proper permaculture - to become perennial. There were some severe erosion vulnerabilities with the location however. Be sure to consider landslide vulnerability when looking at property in this area because of the loose shell-based soil (can't remember the technical name for this type of sediment), heavy seasonal rains and earthquakes. All of this is something the soil engineer assesses intensively. Some properties have soil reports done, it's very informative to read one if you can get a copy from the realtor (even if you're not interested in that particular property). Fire risk is also important to consider when you are living in a remote forest.

It may sound like a lot, but don't be afraid! There's a way for Permaculture to exist everywhere; as it should.

P.S. There's a lot of great oak forested land in Humboldt county in the hills (around Willits, Garberville, Lost Coast, etc.) not sure how hard it is to find places with water but it's certainly around. Large, remote parcels are pretty reasonable. Oh yeah, and Anderson Valley is just lovely too.
 
Amalia Valencia
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you think of purchasing some land in California, it is crucial that you consider not only price, but quality. As you can get plenty of desert land for cheap, but this is not the best option if you are really willing to grow something or enjoy green scenery as you've mentioned. Overall, yoy can check out the landwatch and select what is better for you, in terms of location and quality of the land... Plus, you will see prices.
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!