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massive floods in the US, deaths of livestock, farmers going bankrupt--what to do? Grow more food  RSS feed

 
gardener
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Chris Kott wrote:I am pretty sure that most of the processed industrial waste they market as food is made from corn, and all the factory-farmed beef that should be out grazing on pasture are also fed corn.

Is it naive to hope that its only the shit we really don't want to be eating anyways that will have issues?

-CK



Unfortunately, yes. It IS naive.

I've been trying to tell people in real life, neighbors etc about this. Their answers are often things like "I don't eat much beef anyway." Good, but the people who do will be buying more chicken, and feed for them is coming in low too, so the prices will go up there, and more people will be buying chicken.  "Oh, well I eat pork too."  Good, but so will everyone else, and again, feed and more demand, the prices WILL be going up. Doesn't matter WHAT you eat, people who don't usually do so will be if they can't afford or get what they prefer. When the garbage food gets too high priced, whatever is cheapest will take the next hit.

This area runs a lot of cows, I talked to someone who said "we were discussing keeping the babies this year instead of butchering them." Oh yes, they will be very valuable little creatures. I also expect to see a lot more deer hunters this fall, and the consequent damage to the deer population. This is going to resonate down some unexpected paths. I can guess some, I expect to be surprised by some. Nature is an interconnected web, and it's pattern is distorted by what is going on with the big farms to start with. No guesses how far the distortion will go. I expect years of fallout from this. You've probably heard the bit about reintroducing wolves to Yellowstone changed the flow of the rivers. How much more impact will this have? I don't think anyone knows, and few are looking very far ahead. Hard to get people to even look ahead enough to plant some garden crops.

 
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Trouble COULD be brewing? I think that ship has sailed.

It's not looking good around here. Food prices are already rising. I'm soooo glad that I planned on a larger garden & more chickens in advance this year. Even with advance preparation the past month has been very busy with planting. Out of space at the moment but there is still 2 or 3 weeks more time to plant here. Trying to get one more area ready & planted before then. Have a strong hunch that neighbors & friends & even some complete strangers will appreciate the quality food more than ever this year. I can't solve everyone's problems but I can help a few. Gives me hope & a warm fuzzy feeling to see others doing the same!!!

I'm seeing this whole situation as a chance to try to educate people who otherwise might not be interested.
 
pollinator
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I saw this just now and thought it would be relevant. I hope everyone is doing ok

https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2019/05/17/us/multiday-severe-weather-outbreak-weekend-wxc/index.html
 
master pollinator
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I figured. Wishful thinking, I guess. The processed crap companies probably have contracts that ensure they get what they need, and that would drive the cost up on the rest.

Dwelling on the horror doesn't work, though. We watch horror for fun. When it hits our bank accounts, that's when most people who aren't literally in the flood path start to notice. Even then, we have this disconnect, the same one that makes people subconsciously think that meat comes on plastic-wrapped trays from the grocery store.

As with the, "...then I'll eat pork" comment, it's very Marie-Antoinette-esque. I think it comes from that disconnection. It looks like the masses adopted more than a fondness for monocultured lawns from the French aristocracy.

-CK
 
James Landreth
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On a positive note:


My church agreed to do a public educational food forest right out front in a square of what is (for now!) lawn!! I'm presenting to the congregation in June, they're coming to see my young food forest in August, and we break ground in fall! I've already got the trees in pots for it. We're going to try to get the girl scouts and master gardeners involved
 
Pearl Sutton
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Tuesday, May 21 2019 update on my area: Heavy rain and a few tornadoes, in the last 24 hours about 6 inches of rain, onto already saturated ground. Watch for the Mississippi to jump it's banks again.
I was up near the lakes, and they are deep, even with really solid outflow running.

 
Pearl Sutton
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I can't decide whether to make this a post of it's own, or put it here. I'll put it here for now.

I was reading an article on an economics blog I like, Of Two Minds  and this part of this article struck me. The article is titled “What Would It Take to Spark a Rural/Small-Town Revival?” and most of it I didn’t find interesting. This part I found fascinating and well written.

 2. Globalization has lowered the cost of agricultural commodities by exposing every locality to globally set prices (supply and demand) which are also distorted by currency fluctuations.

The relatively low cost of fuels has enabled produce from thousands of miles away to be shipped to supermarkets virtually everywhere.

These mega-trends have slashed farming incomes while costs have risen across the board. This squeeze as revenues decline and costs increase has driven even the most diligent and devoted farmers out of business or reduced them to hanging on by a thread.

What would it take reverse these trends?

1. The price of agricultural commodities and products would have to triple or quadruple, so that farming would become lucrative and attract capital and talent.

Imagine an economy where ambitious people wanted to get into agriculture rather than investment banking. It's a stretch to even imagine this, but if energy suddenly became much more expensive and crop failures globally became the norm due to fungi, plant viruses and pests that can no longer be controlled and adverse weather patterns, this could very rapidly change the price of ag products to the benefit of local producers.

Another potential dynamic is the decline of global trade due to geopolitical issues and domestic politics, i.e. the desire to reshore "strategic industries" such as food production regardless of the higher costs such a trend might cause.



This is the niche I see permaculture supremely fitted for, and with the adverse current weather patterns going on in the Midwest, more likely to happen than it has been for quite some time.
 
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Well, I bought a years worth of chicken wheat, I feed soaked grains.  I checked my stock of human grains and legumes and I will keep doing what I can on home grown food/garden.  I should get plenty of winter squash and potatoes and fruit to put by and year round greens.  

I got the does settled, lost the dam and kids last month,  at least 2 should kid next month

Otherwise, not much else I can do. -- just hold on Tight for whatever wild ride we get
 
this is supposed to be a surprise, but it smells like a tiny ad:
Wild Homesteading - Work with nature to grow food and start/build your homestead
https://permies.com/t/96779/Wild-Homesteading-Work-nature-grow
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