• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Mike Haasl
  • James Freyr
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Kate Downham
  • Jay Angler
  • thomas rubino

The power goes out. What next?

 
gardener
Posts: 677
Location: SoCal USA
135
cat dog trees wofati composting toilet bike solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Currently living in the city, disaster prep is limiited to 1-2 days at best (so not really "disaster" prep in my opinion) with limited water storage including a small chest freezer filled with frozen gallon jugs of water- I can toss frozen foods in there and it will take some time for that ice to melt, and the temp will stay aroung 32F during that process. After that I will have drinking water as I use up the initial water. Just a gallon a day to use. While I have 3 rain barrels, we rarely get any rain between March 1 and December 1, and that water is contaminated from a roof that accumulates air pollution over time. Unless I fill the barrels by hose, there's no water for me there. Using the barrels to water the plants and topping off with a hose though does provide about 150 gallons of water storage in case there is a need.

Since I want to benefit from the federal tax credit I plan to purchase a solar system this year. Future goal is being totally off grid at my new property, since running grid power to the building site will cost $25,000+ according to the utility versus $5000 or a little less for solar and batteries, minus tax credits. The eventual goal is a well that's pumped by solar, filling 1000-2000 gallons of storage with a float switch to tun it off, stored in a building which also has gutters going to another cistern for garden water storage. Installing a hand pump as a backup seems smart, not sure if that's an option when the static water levels are 60-70 feet down? Perhaps gearing a manual pump to be powered by bike pedal power is an option?

Cisterns filled by rainwater and well water could either gravity feed to the house, or if I feel deprived by low pressure showers I could add the pressure tank and extra pump for that, not sure. The fewer things that depend on power, especially battery power for 24/7 use, the longer the batteries can last over the years.

While freezing food to store would be convenient, I'm thinking pressure canning and lacto fermenting food would be a more secure method of food storage, and reduce the load on a PV/battery system. Heating and cooling will be simple enough in a hybrid Oehler/wofati home, heated by a RMH and cooling probably not needed at all. Building the RMH now in the back yard to play around and test. Hoping to improve gardening and harvesting skills now and try to maximize the diet from grown food versus bought, right now it's mostly fruits and potatoes as a hobby.

Having a plan to deal with "zombies" (aka the generally clueless populace that will turn to looting and worse once hungry enough) is limited. If you're out in the country and have friendly neighbors, perhaps everyone helps each other get larger gardens going and learns how to preserve that harvest. Focusing on the bad stuff that can happen beyond that feels like wasted mental energy to me. Most of us live where we can based on work, which leaves us at the mercy of (at least in the USA) flagging infrastructure systems. My goal is to retire in a couple more years when the primary focus in life will no longer be finances, and start designing my own little permaculture paradise.

Perhaps I can claim that my less than ideal diet which results in those extra 20-30 pounds is a sort of insurance, in case I have to go a few weeks without eating? Probably a stretch...
 
master steward
Posts: 11403
Location: Pacific Northwest
4851
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mark Brunnr wrote:

Since I want to benefit from the federal tax credit I plan to purchase a solar system this year. Future goal is being totally off grid at my new property, since running grid power to the building site will cost $25,000+ according to the utility versus $5000 or a little less for solar and batteries, minus tax credits. The eventual goal is a well that's pumped by solar, filling 1000-2000 gallons of storage with a float switch to tun it off, stored in a building which also has gutters going to another cistern for garden water storage. Installing a hand pump as a backup seems smart, not sure if that's an option when the static water levels are 60-70 feet down? Perhaps gearing a manual pump to be powered by bike pedal power is an option?



This thread got me searching for how to harness bike power. I am totally NOT mechanically inclined, so hopefully someone who knows more can figure out something cheaper. I did run across some spiffy bike power devices.

The Upcycle Ecocharge has options to come with an accessories. One allows you to plug in devices that charge while you pedal, but I don't know if they recieve a constant charge via dynamo technology or the amount of electricity changes instantly if you stop pedaling for a second. One accessory allows you to plug straight into a wall to power your house (when on grid). It costs like $1,100, though!






On the topic of disasters and time before electricty and normal services are up and running, my state government tells me (https://www.dnr.wa.gov/programs-and-services/geology/geologic-hazards/emergency-preparedness#earthquakes.7)

Prepare to be on your own for at least three days. For a "great" earthquake (M8.0 or larger) it might be prudent and reasonable to prepare for being on your own for up to 3 weeks.



And, the Emergancy Managment Division says at least two weeks. https://www.mil.wa.gov/preparedness



If these organizations are saying at least 2-3 weeks, I'm thinking I should be prepared for at least three months, especially since I live out where it usually take a day or two longer to get electricity back after a storm than in the city.

The worst part for me is, my husband works at the hospital. In case of a big emergency like an earthquake (or even this year's snow storm) he is required to be at work--no excuses. So he'd probably be living/working at the hospital while I'm at home with our kids, for however long the emergency lasts. And, with a giant earthquake probably knocking out most of the bridges, he might not be able to make it home for a long time. Worst case scenario, if the power is out for so long and it's dry that there's no water in our rain barrel, I'll be hauling water from the tannic wetland/pond 1/4 mile away and boiling it and filtering it though our little sawyer water filter. There's beavers in that wetland, so I'm not messing around with me or my kids getting giardia!
 
Posts: 302
Location: South Central Kansas
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nicole Alderman wrote:

Jennifer Richardson wrote:

Manual fan. Cheap folding souvenir kind that can be found at county fairs or Asian gift shops in the mall. Or cut out a circle of cardboard and glue it to a popsicle stick. Surprisingly effective especially in conjunction with water.



Battery powered handheld fan that sprays water on you. Resorting to cheap plastic Walmart crap is a form of defeat, but it feels REALLY good when you’re desperate.



We picked up one of these at a grocery store. It's cheap plastic and the handle falls off, but WOW it works well on cooling us (and our food) down!



I don't know why they make electric/battery-powered fans when handcrank fans work so well. I really would love to find one that is made of more durable materials!


James Landreth wrote:
I agree. We can take the situation in Puerto Rico as an example. It's not improbable that an earthquake in the west or a major storm in the east (in the US) could damage the power grid for several months. T



This is my great worry. We do find in short (3 days or less) power outages. We use our generator to run our freezer and fridge (this thread is a good reminder to clean out the generator) and just cook on the woodstove and wash dishes with our rainbarrel water that I boil on the woodstove. And, I'm pretty sure our septic system would be good for a long time if all we were doing was flushing the toilets with rainbarrel water.

We're on a well, and the pressure in our pressure tank held out for drinking water for the longest outage we had. We ONLY used the running water to drink and dribble a little water over our dishes as a final rinse. What I would LOVE would be to have a manual pump. I found this pump (https://www.handpumps.com/excelsior-e2.html) that you can use to manually fill your pressure tank, without the use of electricity. I think this would be fantastic thing to have...as long as an earthquake didn't destroy our well and pressure tank, that is!





I've looked into getting a manual pump like the flo-jak, but I'm not really seeing any impartial reviews on it. Has anyone bought and used a flo-jak?

As for lighting and charging things, I've pretty much given up on solar stuff. We get so little sun during the winter that EVERY SINGLE solar light I've bought, has not survived winter. I have no operational panels.

I like hand-crank stuff butter. this radio is handcrank and has a nice reading light, as well as flashlight, and can charge devices. It's got great sound, too, and even picks up a few shortwave stations for added entertainment.



I would LOVE to have a bicycle-powered light. Anyone who's not working could be riding the bike (you could ride while knitting or reading or even whittling) and generate light. But, I'm assuming that'd need some sort of battery? I'd LOVE to get away from needing a battery, as those probably don't last forever and are toxic to dispose of and the mining for them is pretty devastating to areas of our world. But, my little hand-crank radio probably has a battery that it charges, or else it wouldn't hold the charge I give it (like another one of my hand-crank radios is now.)

Hmmmm, on the subject of refrigeration, I wonder if I put a ton of insulation around my chest freezer, could I use a bicycle for like 30 minutes a day to bring it down to freezing temperatures?



I have that exact same radio you showed.
BAD instructions too.

You get solar/crank/radio setting and you have no idea if the thing has to charge that way or not.

Cranking - doesn't say how long or how fast nor which direction to crank.
The USB cable has no storage place for it.
For the most part it does work.
 
Kai Walker
Posts: 302
Location: South Central Kansas
7
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Rainwater collection and use -

Be aware that most roofs exude toxins into that rain water especially asphalt.

Best to use a solder-free COPPER sheet roof and gutters/downspouts. Aluminum has been linked to alzheimer's. Clay tile (aka Mexican style roofs) COULD have nasties in the type of clay used and the firing process.

Piping and valves should probably be black iron - brass usually has lead in it and plastic - glues and leeching xenoestrogens are bad for you. Estrogens in ANY form can increase insulin resistance (aka lead to type 2 diabetes), especially in males. Females have Progesterone and other goodies that mitigate some of the problems. Avoid plastic containers and such as much as possible.
 
pioneer
Posts: 105
Location: Southeast Missouri
36
hugelkultur forest garden cooking building woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We are living in a rented house in a small town while we build our home so we can move out to the woods.  We will be on the grid there and will have county water because both are readily and cheaply available.  Right now its a matter of cash flow.  I can get electricity and county water to my place for less than $1000.  That lets me keep my cash available for building the house without a mortgage.  Once in the house and no longer paying rent, we will put in solar backup for things like fridge and freezer.  The water table is high enough that I plan to put in a sand point shallow well to keep plants and critters watered.  

I've been without power in town for 4 days because of an ice storm and it wasn't much fun.  Gas central heat doesn't work without electricity.  We are taking steps during the build of our place to provide backups.  Interestingly enough, I have a cousin who is a realtor.  She told us that off the grid places are difficult to sell because they are a niche market and too many people don't understand the whole concept.  Grid tied systems are easier to sell, but if it adds to the asking price of a place compared to similar homes people balk.  Amazing how people get into a box and won't look at anything new and different, even if it is good for them.
 
Kai Walker
Posts: 302
Location: South Central Kansas
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
About power. Static inverter?
 
pollinator
Posts: 4958
1126
transportation duck trees rabbit tiny house chicken earthworks building woodworking
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We have CMP here, also known as Central Maine Power. I not so affectionately call it; Can't Maintain Power. The power goes out a lot here, and while the longest I have been out is 14 days, last year it was 9 days.

But we are equipped to handle it. This house site was built in the year 1800, so there is a hand dug well I can pop the cap off from, and haul water by bucket. I could drink it as well, but I would boil it first just because it is not sealed from any surface contamination.

I also have a woodstove for back up heat.

But the biggest way of coping is having a big generator. Mine is 20 KW so I can power two houses off it if I wanted. Most people do not know this, but you can buy a PTO powered generator that runs off your tractor for very little money. For almost as much money as a portable generator that might produce 8000 watts, you can get a PTO generator that is 20,000 watts. You can because you are not paying for an engine to run it. And the power on a PTO generator is considered "clean" power and can power electronics since the power output is much more smooth. Mine ha its own doghouse surrounding it, and is direct wired to my house so it is as if we never lost power when that thing is running.

There are some down sides though, like if I need to push snow out of the driveway while the power is out, I cannot run my generator for the house. And it does put hours on my farm tractor just sitting there running the generator. But when the power goes out, both of those things are pretty minor. My family can be without power for an hour while I push snow, and I bought a farm tractor to use, and powering up the house for my family is a very good use of it.

I have a 275 gallon tank of off-road fuel for my tractor always at the ready, but also have other 275 tanks at my father's house, so using 5 gallons per day of fuel, I can go months on the fuel I have on the farm here, and that says nothing about going out and buying more.

Ideally I would like to make things even better, and buy a small used diesel engine to power my generator. I can get a 25 hp Kubota used for $1700 which would couple straight up to my PTO generator. That would save me from putting hours on my farm tractor, but also save me from hooking up to the generator when the power goes out. It would just always be ready. A turn of the key, a flip of a switch to keep power from going out on the grid, and my house is fully lit without fear of frying sensitive electronics.

DSCN0420.JPG
[Thumbnail for DSCN0420.JPG]
Generator Waiting For Use
 
gardener
Posts: 1834
Location: Southern Illinois
326
transportation cat dog fungi trees building writing rocket stoves woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Back in 2009 we had a super-derecho come through the area.  For those not familiar with a derecho, it is an extremely strong thunderstorm system that packs hurricane force winds.  The one that struck us was an extremely strong one.  We had sustained 100 mph winds for about 90 minutes and after the storm let up the area was virtually impassible.

Our power was out for about a week, but some lost power for 3 weeks.  Since that time I bought a generator (5500 watts) and try to keep about 10 gallons of gasoline on hand.  I also wired a transfer switch into my main breaker box.  This allows me to power a select number of circuits in my house (8 in my case).  

Some people try to power their homes by making an extension cord with two male ends, turn off the main breaker and then plug in the generator.  This will work but is illegal.  If for some reason the main breaker is turned back on and the generator is still running & plugged in, it will send a surge of electricity down the main line that can be deadly to a lineman working to restore power.  A transfer switch by contrast has a built-in break-before-make switch that guarantees that you cannot send a surge of electricity down a dead line.

This setup only gives me about a day of continuous run time, so I am looking into a solar panel-portable battery bank solution to augment.  The battery pack should be good for 3k watts and of course can be charged by solar.

But more important than power is water and food.  We have been without water before and it was much worse than being without power.  And when the derecho hit, money was important to get a few necessities we did not have on hand (we were at work when the storm hit).

All-in-all I would say that one would want a diverse range of backup options and not just a couple really excellent options.

Eric
 
Kai Walker
Posts: 302
Location: South Central Kansas
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Eric Hanson wrote:Back in 2009 we had a super-derecho come through the area.  For those not familiar with a derecho, it is an extremely strong thunderstorm system that packs hurricane force winds.  The one that struck us was an extremely strong one.  We had sustained 100 mph winds for about 90 minutes and after the storm let up the area was virtually impassible.

Our power was out for about a week, but some lost power for 3 weeks.  Since that time I bought a generator (5500 watts) and try to keep about 10 gallons of gasoline on hand.  I also wired a transfer switch into my main breaker box.  This allows me to power a select number of circuits in my house (8 in my case).  

Some people try to power their homes by making an extension cord with two male ends, turn off the main breaker and then plug in the generator.  This will work but is illegal.  If for some reason the main breaker is turned back on and the generator is still running & plugged in, it will send a surge of electricity down the main line that can be deadly to a lineman working to restore power.  A transfer switch by contrast has a built-in break-before-make switch that guarantees that you cannot send a surge of electricity down a dead line.

This setup only gives me about a day of continuous run time, so I am looking into a solar panel-portable battery bank solution to augment.  The battery pack should be good for 3k watts and of course can be charged by solar.

But more important than power is water and food.  We have been without water before and it was much worse than being without power.  And when the derecho hit, money was important to get a few necessities we did not have on hand (we were at work when the storm hit).

All-in-all I would say that one would want a diverse range of backup options and not just a couple really excellent options.

Eric



A good supply of Duracells would be wise too.

Or one of those ever flashlight or the shake kind.

Switch everything over to LED lighting too. Less power demand.

A static inverter, 2K watts can be used temporarily.

https://www.harborfreight.com/2000-watt-continuous4000-watt-peak-modified-sine-wave-power-inverter-63429.html?_br_psugg_q=inverter

Just be sure your gas tank is full and restart the car every hour or so for 20 min unless you let it idle.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1295
Location: Victoria BC
156
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kai Walker wrote:

Eric Hanson wrote:Back in 2009 we had a super-derecho come through the area.  For those not familiar with a derecho, it is an extremely strong thunderstorm system that packs hurricane force winds.  The one that struck us was an extremely strong one.  We had sustained 100 mph winds for about 90 minutes and after the storm let up the area was virtually impassible.

Our power was out for about a week, but some lost power for 3 weeks.  Since that time I bought a generator (5500 watts) and try to keep about 10 gallons of gasoline on hand.  I also wired a transfer switch into my main breaker box.  This allows me to power a select number of circuits in my house (8 in my case).  

Some people try to power their homes by making an extension cord with two male ends, turn off the main breaker and then plug in the generator.  This will work but is illegal.  If for some reason the main breaker is turned back on and the generator is still running & plugged in, it will send a surge of electricity down the main line that can be deadly to a lineman working to restore power.  A transfer switch by contrast has a built-in break-before-make switch that guarantees that you cannot send a surge of electricity down a dead line.

This setup only gives me about a day of continuous run time, so I am looking into a solar panel-portable battery bank solution to augment.  The battery pack should be good for 3k watts and of course can be charged by solar.

But more important than power is water and food.  We have been without water before and it was much worse than being without power.  And when the derecho hit, money was important to get a few necessities we did not have on hand (we were at work when the storm hit).

All-in-all I would say that one would want a diverse range of backup options and not just a couple really excellent options.

Eric



A good supply of Duracells would be wise too.

Or one of those ever flashlight or the shake kind.

Switch everything over to LED lighting too. Less power demand.

A static inverter, 2K watts can be used temporarily.

https://www.harborfreight.com/2000-watt-continuous4000-watt-peak-modified-sine-wave-power-inverter-63429.html?_br_psugg_q=inverter

Just be sure your gas tank is full and restart the car every hour or so for 20 min unless you let it idle.



There are some excellent battery powered lighting options out there.

For those who like taking care of such stuff and don't have small kids there are TONS of lithium ion powered flashlights and headlamps available that will run on rechargeable18650 type cells.

Neutral or warm white, or high CRI, will gice nice useable light without the harsh blue tint most accept in their LED lighting.

Convoy is a popular budget brand for these lights.

If you don't want to be careful with potentially dangerous battery cells(toxic as heck inside, can blow up if mistreated), probably Milwaukee's M18 Trueview worklights are your best bet; these are neutral white light and vastly superior to those I have seem available from other brands. They share batteries with the vast array of M18 tools. Still lithium ion powered but these cells are in sealed packs, much harder to harm, and I expect there is some degree of monitoring implemented in both the battery packs and chargers.

There is an M18 charger with 12/24V input for vehicle or offgrid use.

 
Eric Hanson
gardener
Posts: 1834
Location: Southern Illinois
326
transportation cat dog fungi trees building writing rocket stoves woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dillon, Kai,

You both are absolutely right that having a decent battery supply for flashlights, radios and other small items is important.  Fortunately, we keep a small collection of LED flashlights with D cell batteries handy.  On top of that, I also have a couple of very nice 18 volt lights powered by batteries meant for power tools.  Personally, I am in the Ridgid platform and I have two flashlights, a small fan and a radio all powered by the same battery platform.  To power these and my other tools, I have five 4 amp hour batteries that I keep topped off.  A 4 amp hour battery will run the fan for about a day in the slowest setting and the smaller flashlight for two straight days.  With judicious use, this supply should last me a long time, though part of me wants to add in a couple of 6 amp hour batteries, one of the floodlights and a new radio that has a built in inverter.

If I get serious about expanding beyond my 18 volt line I would seriously look at building a battery generator (really just a big battery inverter).  I found a good design online that has a very nice series of YouTube videos that show a step by step process to make the whole device.  It is not cheap though, coming in at almost $1000 for 3000 watts, but it is a very nice design.

At any rate, everything I have mentioned here assumes that the power eventually comes back on.  I know from experience that week-long power outages can and do happen and that a little preparedness can greatly ease the difficulties of losing electricity we are so accustomed to having available.

Eric
 
Kai Walker
Posts: 302
Location: South Central Kansas
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I personally do not recommend 18 volt emergency items.
They require a charger to convert from 12vdc to 18vdc or 120vac.
Each conversion you can lose 10% to 50% of the energy used to charge an item.

A 12vdc item is direct from a car battery or car charging system.

Losses then are negligible.

18v power tools are great for ON GRID use/charging.

I read that many solar panels for say RV use are 12vdc?

One is 12vdc two in series are 24vdc.
Either way they do not add up to 18vdc. You would have to reduce 24 down or increase 12 up and both methods waste valuable energy.


FYI: most laptops use 19vac power from 120vac. Other devices use 5vdc.

Easier to reduce 12vdc down to 5vdc than to increase 12vdc to 18vdc. or higher.

Another problem with electronics is the 'modified sine wave' many static inverters output. They convert a square wave into a modified sine wave.
This can cause hum and noise in electronics. The use of a transformer can help reduce that problem or just buy a pure sine wave output static inverter.

About energy storage. the most reliable and insanely long term storage device is the Edison  battery. It is nickel-iron type and can last a century before degrading. But insanely expensive to buy or make.

What good is a solar panel if your storage device won't last more than a couple years?

You could use a capacitor bank, But even those have issues.

What you can do is take a GM style clutch fan and attach it to a GM alternator and mount it on a tripod to use wind power for generation.

That can supply power on windy/cloudy days or windy nights.
 
Mark Brunnr
gardener
Posts: 677
Location: SoCal USA
135
cat dog trees wofati composting toilet bike solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Rolls makes a flooded lead acid battery that’s rated for over 7000 cycles at 20% DoD so you can get close to 20 years off those, just have to purchase 2 since they are 6v each.

Edit: Here's an example which includes the cycles/DoD chart.
 
Eric Hanson
gardener
Posts: 1834
Location: Southern Illinois
326
transportation cat dog fungi trees building writing rocket stoves woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kai,

I understand your concerns regarding tool batteries for emergency power use, particularly in regards to energy losses when charging a battery, but in the case I mentioned, the batteries are basically kept topped off with grid power and can also be used when the power goes out.  For my low current application, I can get multiple days of run time from a single battery, and used judiciously, these 5 batteries should last me at least 3 days and maybe a week.

Also, I also have a generator to run occasionally.  I need to emphasize the occasional aspect.  Generators are most efficient (most watts produced per gallon of fuel) while running under a load.  Just idling consumes a fair amount of fuel without producing lots of useable electricity.  Perhaps the best option for running a generator would be to run it under load for say an hour running the fridge, freezer and battery charger(s), thus letting the batteries capture the excess energy for slow release later.

The battery generator I have in mind is powered by a 55 amp hour battery with the potential to add in more.  I would think that a single 12v 55ah battery would power most all your energy electrical needs for many days, depending on the load.  To boot, the design is set up be charged by up to 400 watts worth of solar panels.

Kai, you have fair points and I am pleased that you appreciate the efficiency loses that inevitably result whenever changing from one form of power to another.  My 18 volt batteries are not a perfect solution, but they are solutions I always have on hand.

Eric
 
pollinator
Posts: 1436
Location: 4b
304
dog forest garden trees bee building
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have lots of flashlights, candles, lamps, etc., but for emergency lighting, my favorite is those solar lights they make to go alongside your sidewalk or driveway.  You can get them for a couple bucks.  If you bring one inside, flip it upside down and set it on your table or counter, you have plenty of light for normal tasks and to walk around without running into things.  Obviously, brighter light is needed for some things, but these solar light have gotten me through a number of shorter term (a couple days) outages.

These are the type I'm talking about:

solar-lights.jpeg
[Thumbnail for solar-lights.jpeg]
 
Kai Walker
Posts: 302
Location: South Central Kansas
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mark Brunnr wrote:Rolls makes a flooded lead acid battery that’s rated for over 7000 cycles at 20% DoD so you can get close to 20 years off those, just have to purchase 2 since they are 6v each.

Edit: Here's an example which includes the cycles/DoD chart.



Hope you are well stocked on Wheaties!

Weight 100 kg 220.5 lbs

440 pounds to lug round is a bit much lol

https://ironedison.com/nickel-iron-ni-fe-battery
Worth the money if you got some spare change lying around....
 
Kai Walker
Posts: 302
Location: South Central Kansas
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Trace Oswald wrote:I have lots of flashlights, candles, lamps, etc., but for emergency lighting, my favorite is those solar lights they make to go alongside your sidewalk or driveway.  You can get them for a couple bucks.  If you bring one inside, flip it upside down and set it on your table or counter, you have plenty of light for normal tasks and to walk around without running into things.  Obviously, brighter light is needed for some things, but these solar light have gotten me through a number of shorter term (a couple days) outages.

These are the type I'm talking about:



LOL I got one of those for my wife (walmart).
They get really DIM after a year.....

Hers were on sale for I think $1. Now they are $5.

 
Trace Oswald
pollinator
Posts: 1436
Location: 4b
304
dog forest garden trees bee building
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kai Walker wrote:

Trace Oswald wrote:I have lots of flashlights, candles, lamps, etc., but for emergency lighting, my favorite is those solar lights they make to go alongside your sidewalk or driveway.  You can get them for a couple bucks.  If you bring one inside, flip it upside down and set it on your table or counter, you have plenty of light for normal tasks and to walk around without running into things.  Obviously, brighter light is needed for some things, but these solar light have gotten me through a number of shorter term (a couple days) outages.

These are the type I'm talking about:



LOL I got one of those for my wife (walmart).
They get really DIM after a year.....

Hers were on sale for I think $1. Now they are $5.



My local walmart has them right now, 12 for approx $20.  They do go dim after some time, but at a buck or so a piece, they are cheaper than replacement batteries for my better lights.  
 
I hired a bunch of ninjas. The fridge is empty, but I can't find them to tell them the mission.
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!