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!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! My re-use projects--- and yours as well  RSS feed

 
Joel Bercardin
Posts: 251
Location: Western Canadian mtn valley, zone 6b, 750mm (30") precip
20
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This is a variant on the sprinkler stand I previously made and which I illustrated above. But this time I didn't have an existing steel-rod base to add weight onto, so I made a base that would have an adequate footprint and also enough weight (by virtue of its materials) to be stable.

I had some square tubing that I'd salvaged from our local public dump - before they put in the surveillance cameras to deter people from grabbing useful bits! Anyhow, these were not long pieces, so I wound up using two that had a 2-inch cross section, and two that were just 11/2 inch. In addition, I'd found a piece of quarter-inch by 2-inch strap steel. All were extremely rusted. Since I was going to weld pieces together, I used an angle grinder with wire-brush head to clean off the rust.

I cut tubing pieces to about 13 inches. My design was to weld them together in such a way that the ends are left open. My idea was that if I needed to add more weight, I could stuff the tubes with mason's mortar. By itself, the tubing base weighs about 15 lbs. I calculated that enough cement/mortar to fill the tubing would weigh about nine lbs when cured.

I brazed the bottom plumbing component onto the strap. Above that I used fittings to connect to a four-foot long threaded pipe. With a "butterfly-type" twirling sprinkler mounted on this sprinkler stand, it doesn't need to withstand much reaction, as would be the case with an impulse type head. So the extra weight from cement/mortar in the base proved not to be necessary for this one.




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allen lumley
pollinator
Posts: 4154
Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
58
books fungi hugelkultur solar wofati woodworking
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- O.K., I'm late to the party on this one but any medium to large re/up-cycled water tub can be a major source of duck weed, that and Black Soldier Fly Grubs

will supply 80% to 90% of all food stuffs for chickens, with much of the rest Self-harvested from various 'weed species' if free ranged ! Big AL

 
Dan Huisjen
Posts: 51
Location: Acadia Region, Maine.
6
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What counts as re-use? There's a lot of stuff out there, available. Never come home with an empty truck.

Let me tell you: I'm in my new residence, which is the apartment over my garage. I call it The Treehouse, which is a term we use at work for a building where air flows freely underneath. I've been working on this for 2 1/2 years, but decided to move in here after my Ex said she was leaving about 9 months ago. My girlfriend likes it.

First of all, I used new lumber for the joists or anything really critically structural, but an awful lot of other lumber. like wall framing 2x4s and bits of bracing here and there, came from the demolition pile at the transfer station. That includes the studs I added under my new ledger that supports my new I-joists on both sides of the building, and the 2x12 stair treads. The stringers were previously floor joists before I replaced the floor, framing and all. The t&g OSB flooring is the dance floor from the last time I got married. It's been waiting patiently in the barn...

Now. looking around...

The two skillets came from the metal pile at the transfer station. So did the stew pot I use for a dish pan, and my 4 gallon stainless pot, and my 5 gallon stainless pot which gets used as a water heater on the wood stove. And the plates, and most of the glasses, and the flatware, and my long carving knife, and my big butcher block cutting board, sauce pans, pressure cooker, bread box, dish drainer, several cookbooks, the microwave, most of my mixing bowls and glass baking pans, and my light fixtures, and a bunch of the wiring, and the big windows (former 4' sliding doors), and five out of six chairs, and the kitchen table, and the two big rugs, and the broom and dustpan and vacuum cleaner, and the mirrors, and the twin bed frame, and the spare twin mattress (gotta use the ozone machine on that still, but it's not bad), and the collection of down comforters, and the metalbestos chimney, and the 1.5 gallon kettle, and the 3 quart whistling kettle, and the coffee pots and melitta cones, and the classroom desk I use as a side table, and the treadle table that's another side table, and the fish tank I've got house plants in, and my radio and speakers, and my box fan and exhaust fans (gotta install them yet...), and my bathroom sink (ditto), and my bathroom medicine cabinet, and my bathroom doctor's scale, , all came from the transfer station.

My kitchen cupboards came from a couple of different friends. One was remodeling her kitchen, and the other was dismanteling her (deceased) mother's single-wide trailer. The old lady's trailer was the source for my kitchen sink, counter, base cupboards, stove, and fridge. There's another matching cupboard I'm using for clothes storage on the other side of the treehouse. Between the fridge and the stove, I have a 4'8" slate counter, which came from a friend who'd gotten it virtually free as someone else's renovation take-out, and then decided that it wasn't going to fit his new kitchen as the giant L shape it came as, so we cut it up with a masonry blade and a garden hose and I got some big pieces. Another of those pieces is the top of my plinth under the wood stove. The wood stove is a Scandia 920 coal stove, which I got from another friend from her mother's barn when it got cleaned out.

My kitchen window and exterior door and bathroom door all came from a contractor who was giving away unused house parts in preparation for a move from a pigeon infested warehouse.

I've got 51 bales of cellulose that I paid for, that I need to blow into my floor cavity this weekend. But every time I run into a scrap of foam insulation board at the transfer station, I bring it home. I'll be throwing all that stuff into the cavities before blowing in the cellulose. Cellulose costs about 80¢ per cubic foot (price on the store shelf, volume once blown in loose), and that means that 5 cubic feet of random foam scrap is worth $4 to me, or more, since it has a higher R-value.

Two out of three of my best garden carts, plus the wheelbarrow and the other hand cart I use for totes of firewood all came from the transfer station. So did my cross country ski boots, new, with the tags still on them. I've gotten a few bikes there, some of which are perfectly ridable, and some of which I've cut up and welded back together to make my wheel-hoe, and my lay-down weeding cart, which is operated in a prone position. My favorite hard-hat, an old plastic Civil Defense helmet, came from the swap room at the transfer station.

I've got a few spare bathtubs, all from the dump. Some are animal water troughs now. One got used to scald the pigs at slaughter time a month ago. The "turkey fryer" burners came off them metal pile too. I suspended it on some big pipes (from the metal pile) stretcher style, with the pipes on sawhorses. I've got a big perforated drum from a commercial clothes dryer that I want to turn into a rotary compost sifter.

My chicken coop is built from scrap wood from the dump, and the door is a plexi door from an old cigarette retail cabinet. My bunny cages are from the metal pile, but I'm switching to using old dog kennels from the same place , as they're better made. When we scraped the pigs, we did it on an old chain link fence gate, set up on sawhorses. I've gotten a few of those gates off the metal pile.

I've got a supply of greenhouse plastic from when the snow took down some local metal round arch greenhouses a few years back, and I got more plastic, in somewhat rougher shape, from a local garden center. They were about to toss it in the transfer station hopper. But it's good enough to lay on the ground in the spring to jump start early seeds. I also have a lot of storm window sash that can be used over hills of seeds the same way. No need for a cloche; just plant the seeds in a well within a mound and put the flat glass over the top.

I got 1 1/2 square of new architectural shingles off the demo pile a couple weeks ago. I put them in my stash for when I need to re-shingle one of the sheds. I look for clean scrap wood there too, which I cut up and burn in the wood stove if I don't need it for other projects. There's a lumber yard where I scout their burn pile for damaged lumber and scrap pallets for the same reason. Sometimes I get 10' pallets that I uses as fence panels.

The sheds house, among other things, my collection of chain and cable, used for rigging and hauling things, much of which is from the transfer station. I've given some of that stash away now and again. A few years ago we got skirted by a tropical storm that came up the coast, and all the boat owners were trying to reinforce their moorings. I've got a good collection of barbell weights for similar uses. Same source.

It's true that I've gotten more than I use. I try to keep it organized. That's why below me in the garage I have supermarket shelves off the metal pile. I think I got 6 vertical standards that the shelves attach to, like upside down Ts, and forty two shelves, each 24"x48", holding various tools and materials.

The wall clock in the treehouse is a $5 garage sale purchase. It's got a 30 day movement, completely non-electric. I also got the "new" 100 amp breaker panel (with breakers, that serves as a garage sub panel and supplies the treehouse) second hand for $75. The 100 amp cable that connects it to the house panel came off the metal pile. The shower pan was a garage sale purchase too and cost me $5.

I use #10 cans and plastic buckets (usually from peanut butter, etc) as kitchen compost containers, feeding containers, and nail bins. These come from the recycling bins at the Co-op. I also get waxed cardboard there, which I cut into strips to use as fire starters in the wood stove.

I got the cat used at the SPCA, barely broken in.

 
Joel Bercardin
Posts: 251
Location: Western Canadian mtn valley, zone 6b, 750mm (30") precip
20
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Dan, great post. Any chance you could post some pictures of how you're re-using and re-purposing stuff?
 
Zach Muller
gardener
Posts: 778
Location: NE Oklahoma zone 7a
36
bike books chicken dog forest garden urban
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I used an old ironing board and some scrap wood to make a nice project table for the garage. It has old castors on one side so it could be easily moved. All the screws used were salvaged from discarded fence pieces.
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Joel Bercardin
Posts: 251
Location: Western Canadian mtn valley, zone 6b, 750mm (30") precip
20
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Interesting, Zach & good pix. Clearly necessary to reinforce that position where you've got the vise, using that stout wooden leg. I'm curious, was there something about the shape of the ironing board surface that makes it particularly useful for some of the things you do? Anyhow, thanks for posting.
 
Zach Muller
gardener
Posts: 778
Location: NE Oklahoma zone 7a
36
bike books chicken dog forest garden urban
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Yeah while the table is metal, it is quite thin so I've added even more wood under the table top. My original thinking was a rectangular table with a metal top, but as I was organizing the garage I saw those holes in the top of the ironing board. Immediately I could see it being used to make guides and jigs for assembling things. Then I was thinking I could make different table tops of wood or metal that could be bolted onto the ironing board. So it wasn't the shape per se, just availability, the fact that it's metal, and the holes in the top. next step is cutting a piece of 1/8 inch steel to bolt on top, then I think it'll be good for many projects.
 
Linda Secker
Posts: 87
Location: Lancaster, UK
1
forest garden trees urban
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Exciting stuff! Here are a couple of pictures of my efforts - please don't laugh, i am VERY new to this, but have really got the bug
a log store made of cot sides, old compost bags 2 pallets and a welly. This has proved too small and I hate the look of the plastic compost bags. It's second incarnation will have a slated roof.
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Linda Secker
Posts: 87
Location: Lancaster, UK
1
forest garden trees urban
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I kitted out the whole of the inside of my old, corrugated shed with materials scavenged from skips. i even re-used screws Here it is part done!

Then I made a clothes drier from 2 cot sides and a length of webbing - can't find a picture and it's currently covered in wet washing but I am very proud of it!
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Joy Banks
Posts: 28
Location: Southeast Arizona, USDA zone 8b, 4200 ft elevation, 12-16 in. rain annually
2
chicken greening the desert urban
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Thanks to the daily-ish emails I found this thread and I am *STOKED* You folks are my heroes! My dream has always been to live off The Waste-stream of America! And now, to see people doing it... (swoon!!) This is heaven!
 
lesley verbrugge
Posts: 44
Location: 48°N in Normandie, France. USDA 8-9 Koppen Cfb
3
bee chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur solar
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John Polk wrote:Speaking of futons; don't forget, most futon mattresses can be thrown on the compost pile.

We used our futon 'mattresses for our rocket mass heater. They are wool/cotton mix and insulate the mass really well, whilst allowing some heat to percolate up to the bums on the bench! We originally used old caravan cushions but they were made of foam and not as good/comfortable/safe.

Was given some old bed posts, which languished forever outside, have repurposed them for the RMH and the wood rack (made from two chopped down Ikea pine shelf units

We also reused the concrete slabs from a set of French rabbit hutches, for the base and back of the rocket.

I love turning old stuff into new-to-us stuff!
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Futon mattress
 
Dale Hodgins
garden master
Posts: 6690
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
252
 
Joel Bercardin
Posts: 251
Location: Western Canadian mtn valley, zone 6b, 750mm (30") precip
20
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That's a fantastic score, Dale.  I'd have to remark that there are some clear benefits to being in your line of work!  (Benefit to your friend, too, obviously.)

Thanks for posting.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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