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Off grid for women alone

 
Posts: 97
Location: North Idaho. Bonner County
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Ellendra Nauriel wrote:

Judith Browning wrote:

Years ago, for only a few months in my early twenties I lived alone in a tent and then a one room off grid cabin and when word got around that there was a single young woman in the woods I had visitors.  Nothing I couldn't handle and I suppose some even had good intentions but all quite annoying because of the supposition that as a woman alone I needed their 'help'.


 




There are certain pieces of equipment that I think of as enough of a unique entity, that I actually give them names. Like the modular scaffolding (which, to be honest, I'm still collecting parts for) that can be assembled into all kinds of configurations. It's name is Steve.

I wonder if saying the name out loud might help get people to back off? "Thanks for the offer, but no. Steve and I can handle it ourselves."

(I must be tired. My brain is stuck in Silliness mode.)



Ellendra, I love this! I name things too, and I am super silly when I'm tired. Lmao! Thanks for the good laugh. I needed it today.
 
Opal-Lia Palmer
Posts: 97
Location: North Idaho. Bonner County
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Heather Davies wrote:I'm in my late 40s and am buying property with no services on it. I'll be off-grid while I build something to live in and put in the gardens, fruit trees, etc. I work on my computer though so I'll be tied to the grid at some point for internet and electric. I'd prefer to skip it, but what can you do...

Like Stacy, I'm more concerned about getting help with projects than my safety. That said, I've heard a huge mountain lion has repeatedly been spotted walking along the treeline where the mountain meets the valley across the road from the property. Between that guy and the bears, I may invest in a rifle if I get animals.

Jules, thanks for your excellent advice. It really resonated with me. I can't help but come off as scary when I react to being pushed, especially by men. I've lost count of how many have called me intimidating. I'm going to use that and the tools I wear when working to my advantage if necessary. So far though, everyone I've met has been okay. Maybe a little old-school sexist, but not threatening.

If there are any ladies (alone or otherwise) in NE Washington/N Idaho who want to connect, let me know. It'd be great to have some local permie friends, and I'd love to see and/or hear about what you're up to!



I'm going to send you a purple moosage :-)
 
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Sandy Ann wrote:Hi
I've been following and watching many off Grid stories but I noticed it seems to attract mainly men. Are there any girls out there doing off grid alone?
I'd love to hear from you






I purchased 10 acres in northeast Nevada about several years ago. Now that I'm retired my dream of homesteading can now start to become a reality. Time to start putting all that information I've been collecting over the years into some practical application. As a child growing up in L.A. I loved frontier films and specifically Grizzly Adams. I'd love to live in the mountains of Montana but I found property prices were high and going up, so looks like NE Nevada may have to be the location I start my homestead. And this 52 year old lady will get'er done no matter what. Trail and error and learning from other. Nothing is too hard when your mindset is determined to do it.
 
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I want to in Australia. I have 2 school aged children. Hardest part is that I can afford land without working and I'd really like to home school the youngest. I don't need a man for much of anything, I reckon we could do it ourselves and outsource what we couldn't.
 
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Location: North Patagonia, Chile
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I just moved to live alone (a couple of months ago) in a small village in northern Patagonia. I live off grid in a cabin, with no electricity and water from a spring. I charge my phone and computer and my external batteries with a portable solar panel and sometimes walk a couple of kilometers to charge them with electricity from my neighbors (on rainy days with no sun), I wash my clothes by hand, my shower is outside the house, my kitchen works with firewood and my WC is outside (a few steps from the house).
Since I arrived a few months ago, much of my time and energy has been invested in improving the house (built for summer) and preparing for winter (with many snow days and freezing temperatures). It is true that living alone is not easy, you have to learn to use your time well, use the resources you have wisely, be strong and above all, trust yourself!
Here people always ask me "are you alone? Do you do everything by yourself? aren't you afraid of living here alone? And I answer yes, I am alone, I do everything by myself and no, I am not afraid, I am very happy! :) ...and I am!
At the beginning the neighbors looked at me with distrust and disbelief (a girl from the city comes to live alone in the mountains, it will only last a few weeks, for sure) but a few months later they realized that I am a strong woman and that yes, I can live alone! They have been integrating me into the community and have shared their experiences and knowledge with me (just a few days ago I received a 25kilos bag of potatoes, as *payment for help them with the harvest).
On the house I have also tried wool as an insulator, I will do some tests with earth and straw in some walls (I am a builder and I specialize in building with natural materials). There is always a natural material around us to work with! ;)
I think the hardest thing about living "alone" is facing those inner fears. The voice in our head that tells us hat we can't do it. To come face to face with our fears, with our insecurities...
But it's also okay to accept when we need help!
Luckily we live in times of internet and we have these support networks, I don't have electricity but I have excellent internet and phone signal that allows me to call my friends and families whenever my strength is failing or just when I want to share my love with them.
Thank you Purity for your words, truly inspiring! And thank you all for sharing your experiences!
Hugs from the South of the World
Claudia
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Posts: 97
Location: Landers, CA
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Clau.....Bravo!  It always warms my heart to hear of others who walk this Path and over-come the challenges day by day.  I just finished watching a great movie on YouTube called July Rising.  It is very true to life about a young woman trying to farm alone after she inherits her grandfather's farm.  Most commenting only saw failure and heartbreak at the end.......but she walked away with a ton of money....enough so that she could start small, pay cash and never be beholding to others.  This is a great lesson....learning to be truly self-sufficient.  You can't be if you owe others money for your piece of heaven. Thank you Clau, for sharing your Journey with us.  My dwellings are also small on my land....and nothing is more wonderful that sitting here looking out the window and seeing, all around me, the fruit and nut trees, the gardens.....the birds singing in the trees.  I can't imagine any other way of living.
 
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Sandy, Been wondering the very same. I just came back from a solo camping adventure from IL across CO to Moab and I've realized now ( ok or at least in the near future) is the time and I really want to collaborate with others.  
Diana
 
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I’m in the planning stage for going off-grid and miles from anyone. I lived off-grid with a partner many years ago and have rented an isolated farm cottage, in the past, although not too far from a neighbour.
I’ll be providing food and shelter for backpackers in exchange for labour when my country opens up the borders again.
I’m grateful for the opportunity to plan my move to another state and happy to Air BnB my home here so I can return when I need to.
I’m experienced with most tools and equipment being a TomGirl, the doting daughter of a builder and carpenter. I have been a metal sculptor and have had a few years part-time tuition in black-smithing.
This journey I am on, to develop an off-grid eco-retreat, is absolutely audacious and while the romantic part of me would love to share this big hairy-bum of an endeavour with some hunk of a man, time is ticking and I ain’t waiting for someone who may not appear.
‘Build it and they (he) will come’ is my motto.
As far as being a single woman living off-grid, I am educating myself about early warning trespass set-ups, boobytraps, night vision, drones and silent weapons. I’m not a fan of guns as they just draw attention. As I have done in the past, I love becoming familiar with my property (during the day and night) and will be living in a habitat that has no predatory animals (except humans, of course). So, if someone wants to come get me, they’ll want to know what they’re doing. Just saying.
 
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I have camped out since 17 years old and met my husband at 19.  We lived all our lives off grid together until his death 10 years ago.  Still off grid alone and loving it.  Grandchildren and children visit and love it too.  I am always upgrading to make a life of ease as I age . Susan
 
pollinator
Posts: 846
Location: Kansas
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A neighbor who moved away a few years ago had four children, the youngest was a girl. All of them had been born while they lived in that house and I'd watched as their parents encouraged the boys to play in the street (or rather, ignored them when they did), to rough house with each other, etc. But I remember one time specifically when the little girl's father turned her around at the property line and told her that if she left the property someone would hurt her. I think she was three at the time.

Both of her parents were professional, educated people, and yet those social expectations are so ingrained that they unconsciously instill fear in a three year old in order to keep her "safe." I doubt it was the first time, or the last, and it's not unusual. Another friend always had her daughter play in the fenced back yard while her brother went on bike rides with his friends.

If we have such subtle fear pounded into our heads from birth, is it surprising that we grow up afraid? If we are taught from a young age that being alone is dangerous, that our own skills and abilities are never enough, that we must be protected for our own good, is it any wonder that as adults we feel the same?
 
Posts: 3
Location: Chicago, IL
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I really appreciate this discussion. Though I'm in a city and do more reading and dreaming than practicing permaculture, I'll add this to the "carry confidence" discussion.  Two years ago, while walking to pick up my daughter at school, my 40lb husky/shepherd dog and I were attacked.  The first moment I recall was looking down on the two 100 lb pit bull/terriers mauling my dog.  The next moment I recall seeing was my two legs wrapped around the head of one of those big attack dogs' head.  We were both lying sideways on the alley pavement.  When all was sorted out- exchanged numbers, dr visits, etc. the "stupified" dog owner offered to pay me $300 for the $500 we had incurred. And after acknowledging that this was far from the first time his dogs had "misbehaved" he had the gall to tell me to "be more careful next time."  I gave him a quick and harsh lecture on his next time... and if I hadn't stepped in, I would have a dead dog.   So, women: Step In. You have more power and survivor instinct than you may know.  
 
gardener
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Location: Poland
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Just so you know, credit for the belligerent chaos of a fence belongs to Lauren of White Hoof Acres - here is her original post on Instagram. You might want to listen to this podcast about how she became a farmer, and how her goat was stolen from her by activists: The Stolen Goat.
 
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Here on 7 acres Midcoast Maine off grid building a small cabin/homestead alone....Slange Var😃✊
 
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Me! Off-grid Virginia right now from scratch. Hand clearing land...etc, etc. Alone.
 
pollinator
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Location: South-central Wisconsin
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Jaylee Gardiner wrote:
I’ll be providing food and shelter for backpackers in exchange for labour when my country opens up the borders again.



As far as being a single woman living off-grid, I am educating myself about early warning trespass set-ups, boobytraps, night vision, drones and silent weapons. I’m not a fan of guns as they just draw attention. As I have done in the past, I love becoming familiar with my property (during the day and night) and will be living in a habitat that has no predatory animals (except humans, of course). So, if someone wants to come get me, they’ll want to know what they’re doing. Just saying.




Just to clarify, you'll have alarms warning you that someone has entered your property, but at the same time you'll be inviting strangers onto your property?

I would strongly recommend studying up on behavioral signals and psychological manipulation methods. That way you'll have a better chance of recognizing if one of those backpackers is trying to trick you into letting down your guard.
 
Posts: 177
Location: USDA Zone 7a
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That wood splitter the guy embellished is over the top! He added everything but the woodstove to it!
 
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I noticed a few posts about rape and fears.
It is a real issue. Some men sometimes view single women living alone, far away from quick help, as fair game. Partly because of our twisted TV culture. Here are a few thoughts on it.
Get a gun, shoot it often, learn how to use it, be comfortable with it. Love the gal with the bow.
Cultivate great relationships with close neighbors, They will be the ones to come to your aid.
Be aware of your surroundings always.
Project confidence EVEN WHEN YOU FEEL NONE.
YOU are STRONG !! Even if you don't think So! You're  out here doing this off grid thing.. You ARE strong!
Take a few self defense classes.
I had some on specifically on management of a rape in progress of you. Tough class. I learned how to get men 3x my size off and injure them enough to get away.
Big dog(s), great first line of defense,  but you have to back them up.
Allowing fear to take over is the worst.  Practice what you would do in your head until the fear of (whatever) is more manageable.
It is rare to have attacks by others but a real possibility.

That said.  I would never change this life. It is SO Awesome!  I WILL NOT allow the fear of what might happen rule my life.
I am so awed of all you amazing gals..I am not alone doing this after all!☺
Don't let them win.
 
Jennelle Lee
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Thanks for your recommendation Ellendra Naurial.
I understand your reasoning given the perceived contradictory statements in my post. However, rather than boring you with lengthy narrative, you  will have to take me at my word that I have better than average experience regarding the assessment of my fellow human beings psychology and behaviour. I am well versed in interpreting physical cues and the motivations of others and would hasten to say that I am sought after for my skills in this area in my professional career. I appreciate your care and caution for me to be mindful about who I invite onto my property. I have a fantastic support system, friends and family that are all along for the ride and I envisage a robust selection process for any backpackers wishing to stay and work on the property, prior (building) experience notwithstanding.
Good thoughts
Kind people
Happy moments
Unexpected blessings


 
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Great thread!
I keep thinking, "What's good for the goose is not always good for the gander."
If you're putting together a lifestyle that's "right" or "comfortable" for you, there's a lot to be said for the impact on mental health.
I'm not a woman, and let's just say I'm not cut out for marriage, but I am alone on raw land, and the challenges are the same.
I've butted heads a few times with locals who assume that I'm, well, "some California liberal..." You know the rest.
I've gotten push-back from the old-schoolers, but in the end, it's their own myopia and insecurity that, for whatever reason, causes them to be defensive.
I've never made it my goal to prove anything, but I do take a secret pride when I can watch the wheels turn, and witness the discovery that I'm really not just completely full of shit.
Anyway, I think it's a great lesson for anyone, male or female, to stand by your own judgement. Not always easy, but it's really at the root of progress.
 
Purity Lopez
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Location: Landers, CA
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I thought about whether I should post my two cents worth regarding people thinking they are good judges of character....professionally trained or otherwise.  I worked in the mental health field for a number of years....specifically, in state mental institutions.  My advice is not to get too cocky about thinking you have it all down pat and can accurately, 100%, judge the character of a person.  Number one rule when working with severely mentally ill psychopaths is remembering that they (and some sociopaths) have NO conscience.  What does this mean?  Well....A person with no conscience does not put off those "vibes" that we pride ourselves as having as our skill set in making those judgements about whether someone is dangerous or not. We only have to look through newspaper archives and confirm that.  I have worked with psychopaths.....trust me on this....there are many that give off no indication at all that they are a bad seed. In fact, just the opposite. Serial killers for instance, are able to kill so many because they are able to give off this essence of well-being...a person that is kind and considerate and has your best interests at heart.

I just finished reading a case study where a man posed as a back-backer. So sociable and friendly.....puppy dog eyed kind of guy.  You don't want to know what he did, and how many he did it to.

Use common sense.  Number two rule is don't trust someone you don't know, no matter how affable they appear.

This does not mean you have to skulk around in fear.  It means you don't trust someone until that someone has proven beyond a shadow of a doubt.....that they are completely trust-worthy.  Me, I don't have a fear based molecule in my body....but I would hesitate quite strongly to have people I don't know parading through my property.  In the 1950's, the time I grew up, this wasn't so.....but times have changed and drastically so in the last year. Be Wise.
 
Posts: 242
Location: Northern California Mediterranean climate zone 10b
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There are certain pieces of equipment that I think of as enough of a unique entity, that I actually give them names. Like the modular scaffolding (which, to be honest, I'm still collecting parts for) that can be assembled into all kinds of configurations. It's name is Steve.

I wonder if saying the name out loud might help get people to back off? "Thanks for the offer, but no. Steve and I can handle it ourselves."

(I must be tired. My brain is stuck in Silliness mode.)



And I thought I was the only one who named my furniture!  The entertainment center is named Lars, and the wooden cabinet is Stan, LOL!
 
Lori Ziemba
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Purity Lopez wrote:I am 75 now and have lived in extremely rural areas since I was 19.  I have always lived alone.  I have lived in wilderness in a tent, and now live in a cabin I built myself in the High Desert of California.  I have never had help, everything I have always done myself....and I am 5'4", 120 pounds.  I still do everything myself.  I have electricity and solar.  I can live entirely without it if I needed to...I use electricity as the back up source.  I grow a good deal of my own food.



Hi Purity,
I'm in N. Calif.  I've been thinking about moving to the desert for a while, but I've been worried about the water situation down there.  How do you irrigate a large garden?
 
Lauren Ritz
pollinator
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Lori Ziemba wrote:

Hi Purity,
I'm in N. Calif.  I've been thinking about moving to the desert for a while, but I've been worried about the water situation down there.  How do you irrigate a large garden?

Depends on the situation. For the most part you don't. Water catchment can be used, but you try to keep your water in the soil if at all possible and use dry gardening techniques to reduce water use.
 
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Curious, what all is required to adequately exchange work for housing?
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I'm 61 and about to end my 31 year, mostly "alone", sojourn living primitively off-grid near Potsdam/Canton NY. My body can't handle the chop wood carry water as much anymore, have to pay help for some of it (the wood anyway) and this is a lifestyle meant for a family affair where everyone does their share.  I've done it for decades on my own, with a rain barrel and springs for water, a small solar power system, 11x18 root cellar, a wood cookstove and rocket mass heater for warmth and sustenance and had some gardens and canned, etc.  I love it in most ways, but living in the woods 17 miles from town...at this time in life I also want to be closer to friends and not drive a car to do it.  

I helped start a non-profit to teach simple living skills, that has been socially rewarding, fun, and enlightening.  Mainly this life teaches you resilience and creativity, I have MacGuyver'ed and Rube Goldberg'ed all manner of things, big and small, and I love the satisfaction of that, making something work from spare pieces parts, figuring out how to get by as low-tech as possible.

Maybe it's where I live, but I have never even had a lock on my doors or windows, although I have an eye hook to keep the door from blowing open that serves as some form of protection I guess. Never gave it much thought, but I don't come off as victim material either. Usually had a dog too but not the past 3-4 years, and not for safety - though they see and hear things in the woods we don't, which is handy.

Built a beautiful house from mostly local materials that I'm prepping to sell now and become a townie.  I had moved here when it was an intentional community forming, which would have provided mutual aid as I get older, but it fell apart years ago, so now I just have some good neighbors of those that remain.  And memories of a purposeful and self-determined life in a beautiful place that will always be a part of me.

My advice, just do it, you can always go conventional again.  Why be normal

PS  Words matter. No "girl" is pulling this off, per the first post here. Never understood (well, guess I do) why it's not considered insulting to call a woman a girl but it is to call a man a boy. Maybe the latter is more of the problem than the former though...I could be buying into a colonial mindset by not asking more about why "boy" is such an insult.  But I guess I feel I earned every one of my years and my dignity as a full-grown adult woman, so prefer to be referred to as such.  It's all good though, I just try to not miss an opportunity to share on this topic.

____________________________  ~\*/~  ~\*/~  ~\*/~  ______________________

What is now a mighty oak, was once but a lone nut that held its ground.
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I'm turning 50, single and doing the off grid thing by myself. Well... I WAS by myself until my son moved onto the property last December. Now, at 75 years old, my mom has decided to join us! She's in a camper until we can get her cabin built. But I'm still essentially doing this on my own. My son is young and has his own interests and I want him to live his life. He lends a hand anytime I ask... but I rarely ask.

Prior to that, I lived in a tent for a couple months then upgraded (if you can call it that) to an old camper and then into an adorable micro house that one of my best friends built for me. We're situated on 22 acres of youngish trees, shrubs and little clearings that I wouldn't call pastures because they're not big enough. lol! I absolutely love this lifestyle. My house is 104 sq feet and in November I'll have been in it for two years. In that time, I've built pens and fences and animal shelters. I even dug out a storm shelter by hand. I'm particularly proud of my goat shed/chicken coop/loft storage shed. lol!

I share my space with a herd of horses, a herd of potbelly pigs, chickens, geese, goats, peacocks, rabbits, cats and dogs. Like literally... we share the space. There are a few pens for kids who like to test their boundaries or just can't live peacefully with these rest, but otherwise, they've had the run of the place. I did move the horses out of my living area after my mom moved onto the property. They're a little too intimidating and messy for her liking.

I used to let hipcampers come out and while I never had a bad experience with any of them, I did have VERY bad experiences with people I thought I knew and called friends. After that, I decided that my life was no longer for public dislpay and I now limit visitors. I don't give farm tours and I keep the front gate locked. I sometimes second guess being closed off, but I'm not ready to try and trust people again.

Living this way is a lot of work, but it's rewarding in so many ways. It's absolutely worth the effort! I'm happy to have strumbled upon this thread because I've been looking for other folks who are taking this lifestyle on alone to hear how they're handling it.
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I like your response. Me, I'm too close to the neighbors and am trying to be ready to go off grid when the collapse happens. Pretty far from that, yet. But at 73 I've gotten more interested in letting other people do some of the heavy work. And I have to get back in shape so I can use the bicycle when we get there.

Anyway, on safety, I bought a recurve bow (also hunting) and haven't yet learned to use it. Have looked at compound bows and they're too high-tech for me. (Ditto crossbows)

I never meant to be here alone - too lonely, too dependent on going to town for company - but so far the right people haven't showed up yet.
 
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Hi Sandy,
I'm a 30yo F based in NY but able and willing to travel (NY isn't the best off grid place). In my opinion, you can YouTube anything these days Let me know what stage you're in in the planning process.. I plan to take a mini road trip in my off grid bus but would like someplace to park it and set up a home base sometime in the near future (or when ever the time is right). Have the $ to invest in land just looking for other serious people. Don't want to end up too culty but certainly want a community. I'll add my general "about me" to my profile if you want to check it out and send me a message if you want to chat further!
Sincerely,
Lia
 
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""Years ago, for only a few months in my early twenties I lived alone in a tent and then a one room off grid cabin and when word got around that there was a single young woman in the woods I had visitors.  Nothing I couldn't handle and I suppose some even had good intentions but all quite annoying because of the supposition that as a woman alone I needed their 'help'.""


Yes, I built a cabin in Montana on a old mining claim I bought from my Uncles Estate.  Fortunately, I had a gate to block people out, but when it was open, I would have visitors  during the day. So, I kept it locked at night.  Unfortunately, the neighboring owner (we had adjoining mining claims) was already in the process of adverse possession when my uncle was alive. So, where I got the land, I had to have an attorney to fight him off. It cost $20,000 to finally get rid of him.  Some of the men thought, that a woman should not be up there alone. The two properties  were surrounded by national forest and about an hour from town down a washed out mining road.

Here is a picture of the original cabin my g. grandfather built and then the one that I built with a chainsaw, a bobcat and an axe with one guy helping me (doing most of the heavy work).  It was on the Continental Divide at an elevation of 7000-7500ft above sea level- amazing and beautiful
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Nance Mortensen
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Nancy Mortensen wrote:

""Years ago, for only a few months in my early twenties I lived alone in a tent and then a one room off grid cabin and when word got around that there was a single young woman in the woods I had visitors.  Nothing I couldn't handle and I suppose some even had good intentions but all quite annoying because of the supposition that as a woman alone I needed their 'help'.""


Yes, I built a cabin in Montana on a old mining claim I bought from my Uncles Estate.  Fortunately, I had a gate to block people out, but when it was open, I would have visitors during the day when the word got out that an ancestor WB Thompson was up at the Boulder Chief.  People were curious so, I kept it locked at night because it was out in the middle of nowhere.  Unfortunately, the neighboring owner (we had adjoining mining claims) was already in the process of adverse possession when my uncle was alive. So, where I got the land, I had to get an attorney to fight him off. It cost $20,000 to finally get rid of him.  Some of the men thought, that a woman should not be up there alone. The two properties were (on "Mt. Thompson"-my great grandfather) 40 acres surrounded by national forest - 5 miles from the nearest town, Basin, Montana.

Here is a picture of the original cabin my grandfather built and then the one that I built with a chainsaw, a bobcat and an axe with one guy helping me (doing most of the heavy work).  It was so remote on the continental divide at an elevation of 7000-7500ft above sea level.

 
pollinator
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I asked my two very smart, home-schooled, confident, tough, strong, beautiful, colorado mountain-girls, ages 14 and 17, if they'd be OK living here on our mortgage-free off-grid homestead, all on their own ... they both quickly answered "No problem, dad ... when are you leaving"?

I didn't like that second part, but the upshot is that they already know how to do everything I do, because they've been right there alongside me doing it ... they both could live together, or independently, out here, and they both said "I'd rather live in the country than the city".

They work with our LGwD (livestock guardian wolf-dog) to patrol the property (40 acres), and they confidently carry knives, handguns, and rifles ... they're both dying to get the cross-bow next, that we're just now testing. All this because we live in a predator-rich environment (southern colorado, at 7400',in a pine forest, next to the mountains ... lions, bears, coyotes, and many other types of big or small critters. Their exact words ... "ain't nobody getting *my* chickens"! Anyone on two legs wouldn't fare much better, if they thought they could push these kids around.

Each now wants their own tiny home, and each will do all the work, with my guidance where needed ... many of their home-schooled friends/peers are doing similar things, independently. We're doing good to just get out of their way.

I think the next generation, where raised in any kind of similar fashion (living rural, home-schooled, socially interactive together *and* over distance, handy with tools, familiar with protecting themselves, able to be self-sufficient, and so on ...) won't think twice about being in the country ... by themselves, or perhaps with a partner who can meet their (now higher than my) standards.

If they can do it, everyone else can, young or old ... and I highly recommend the rural homesteading way of life.

It's now easier than ever to be rural and off-grid (systems are lego-like, from plumbing to power), while still on the 'net (keeping up with all our friends, safely and securely), and driving around to everyone else's homesteads to visit and exchange food/info/fun, and more. It's like a continuous block party, without the block ... instead, spread out over multiple homesteads and throughout the year!
 
Nance Mortensen
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That is a great place to be! Are you stocked up on food way out there? What about water, do you have plenty of water from the ground? Sound like they are having a blast!
 
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