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Vitamins for Plants  RSS feed

 
Bryant RedHawk
garden master
Posts: 2839
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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People take vitamins to help them stay healthy, build their immune system or as a preventative measure during times of stress.
What most gardeners fail to realize is that they should give their plants vitamins for all the same reasons.

Several studies have shown that the vitamins D, A, C and riboflavin help plants reject downy mildew, powdery mildew and scales.
In several threads here I have mentioned that I regularly use multi vitamins on my plants, and for transplanting.
My reasoning is one of my own studies that shows that applications of multi vitamins (dissolved in water) help plants through the stress laden transplanting procedure, especially trees and shrubs.
My study also showed that using multi vitamins on seeds (as a pre plant soak) helped them not succumb to damping off as well as showing rapid growth and stem strength increases.

This year I did some more research along these lines with tomatoes, this time I was wanting to know about flavor and hornworm resistance possibilities.
The hornworm resistance didn't fare so well as we suffered an unusually high level of destructive insect invasion in all our gardens.
The next few years will show if this was a result of climate change or something else.
On the flavor front, the vitamins did increase flavor intensities in both Cherokee Purple and Early Girl varieties, not so much in the Beef Steak variety and the control plants.
Control plants had flavor but not as intense as the subject plants. All plants were attacked by hornworms but the Cherokee Purples tended to have a larger infestation than the Early Girls. 

Zucchini squash grew better, faster and produced very well in spite of being besieged by squash bugs.
Pumpkins also responded as well as the zucchini.  I did not include our butternut plants in this first year of the study because of time constraints from my wife's illness.
Next year I will be able to have subject and controls on all the different squashes we grow.

If you haven't tried giving your plants their vitamins, I encourage you to give it a trial.
I think you will be at least pleased with the outcome and you might just see some improvements along the disease/ pest front as well as in the palatability of your vegetables.

I use one multi vitamin/ multi mineral tab per half gallon of water, directly water the roots not the leaves.
foliar spraying does not seem to be of use when it comes to vitamins.

Redhawk
 
Karen Donnachaidh
pollinator
Posts: 750
Location: Virginia (zone 7)
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Bryant,
Thank you for sharing this. I had read where you mentioned vitamins before. That got me curious and prompted me to read more on this. I had found an interesting article in MEN called Vitamins For Vegetables, about an 11 y.o. boy who conducted an experiment with vitamins A, C, E, B1, B5, B12 and B100. I'll have to find that one again.
I plan on trying this myself. I'm also curious about giving aspirin to sick plants.

(Edit to add: MEN article link.)
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Has anybody here tried Superthrive?

My sister used to swear by it.  It is super concentrated vitamins.  A few drops per water can.
No. It is not OMRI certified, but neither are those multivitamin tablets.

I used it once when a bunch of plants were in transplant shock.  They all sprouted back to good health.

 
Karen Donnachaidh
pollinator
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Location: Virginia (zone 7)
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John,
I have tried it, not on a regular schedule. I think it is like a B -complex.IDK. No great results to report but nothing bad either.
 
Bryant RedHawk
garden master
Posts: 2839
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
233
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hau John, I used to use superthrive every day. When we did a landscape planting, everything got watered in with it so we would not have to replace any plants from shock.

What I use now are the multivitamins that I take daily, once I found through testing that these work just fine, I simply started mixing up my own solutions.
All our orchard trees get a watering in the spring with vitamin/ multi mineral water and our garden vegetables get the same.
The great thing about starting seeds by soaking them is that the treatment last for months so you aren't always trying to keep up with when to use it.

Redhawk
 
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