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Bill Mollison is gone!!??  RSS feed

 
Alder Burns
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I've just seen an unconfirmed report that Bill Mollison died yesterday.  I can't seem to find anything more about it.  Does anyone know more?
 
Cj Sloane
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I've seen the same but no confirmation
 
Burra Maluca
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I don't think there's been any official announcement yet, but I think it may be true. 
 
                  
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On a mobile so difficult to copy paste original ref

https://www.facebook.com/PermablitzMelbourne/photos/a.222208684480470.64844.161728067195199/1337789156255745/
 
Marianne Cicala
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Darren Doherty posted the news on Regrarians site.
and this:

"Word has come through as a message from Bill's family that "He wanted everyone to plant a tree when he passed." If you decide to do that, please spread this hashtag to accompany any photos of you or your friends planting your tree #PlantedforBill"

 
Destiny Hagest
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I've just received an email from Jason over at PRI, looks like it's true

Here's the official statement on this sad event:
http://permaculturenews.org/2016/09/25/bill-mollison/

Looks like it happened yesterday, my condolences to the family. This is truly a loss the world feels.
 
Lee Gee
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Om mani padme hum.

Bruce Charles 'Bill' Mollison 1928-2016

Graham Bell
Sunday, 25th September 2016
Graham Bell's moving tribute to Bill Mollison, who died today, a true pioneer who gave up a promising academic career to challenge the status quo and establish the global Permaculture movement.

Bruce Charles 'Bill' Mollison (born 1928 in Stanley, Tasmania, Australia and died today, 24 September 2016 in Sisters Beach, Tasmania).

A few people are born who are world class heroes to those who know them and unknown to the great majority, until one day their inescapable influence floats to the surface and is generally recognized for the cream it is. In hindsight such leaders go on to become household names.

Such a man was Bill Mollison: backwoodsman, academic, storyteller, lady’s man and to many just ‘Uncle Bill’, but doing all these things par excellence. In consequence he has left a worldwide movement of remarkable resilience. He has left much useful information and not a few words of guidance and encouragement for those who will miss him most.

Growing up in Stanley, Tasmania, he left school at fifteen to help run the family bakery and before 26 went through the occupations of shark fisherman and seaman (bringing vessels from post-war disposals to southern ports), forester, mill-worker, trapper, snarer, tractor driver and naturalist.

His lack of formal education gave him many learning opportunities in how the real world works.

Bill joined the CSIRO (Wildlife Survey Section) in 1954 and gained extensive research knowledge. His time in the Tasmanian rainforests gave him the founding structure for what became his life’s passion - Permaculture. The idea that we could consciously design sustainable systems which enabled human beings to live within their means and for all wild life to flourish with us.

A spell at the Tasmanian Museum in curatorial duties, a return to field work with the Inland Fisheries Commission took him back to college in 1966 living on his wits running cattle, security bouncing at dances, shark fishing, and teaching part-time at an exclusive girls' school. Upon receiving his degree in bio-geography, he was appointed to the University of Tasmania where he later developed the unit of Environmental Psychology. During his university period (which lasted for 10 years), Bill independently researched and published a three-volume treatise on the history and genealogies of the descendants of the Tasmanian aborigines.

In 1974, with David Holmgren, Bill developed the beginning of the permaculture concept, leading to the publication of Permaculture One. He became fixated on proving and promulgating what he saw as a world renewing concept. Leaving the University in 1978, abandoning a secure academic tenure at the age of fifty (an unheard of move) Bill devoted all his energies to furthering the system of permaculture and spreading the idea and principles worldwide. He has taught thousands of students, and has contributed many articles, curricula, reports, and recommendations for farm projects, urban clusters and local government bodies.

In 1981, Bill Mollison received the Right Livelihood Award (sometimes called the "Alternative Nobel Prize") for his work in environmental design. In recent years, he has established a 'Trust in Aid' fund to enable permaculture teachers to reach groups in need, particularly in the poorer parts of the world, with the aim of leaving a core of teachers locally to continue appropriate educational work.

We are helped in remembering Bill by his 1996 autobiography Travels in Dreams. Typically he laughs at himself: “This book is a work of fiction: most if not all of it is lies. Even the lies are imprecise reports of old lies overheard.” He wasn’t universally liked. One reason being he was committed to disrupt the status quo of misguided unfeeling management. “First feel fear, then get angry. Then go with your life into the fight.” He was eloquent about the need for peaceful ‘warriors’ as he called them to challenge the stupidity of ill-governance on a global scale. His own fears about being ineffectual were misguided: “Nobody takes any notice of me and even my friends continually criticize me.” In reality he engendered a massive global respect which will endure and grow as others develop his foundation thinking.

The pinnacle of his career to his students was the publication in 1988 of The Permaculture Designers Manual, honored to this day by devotees as 'The Bible of Permaculture'. If devotees suggests falsely some religious connotation it’s really that Bill pioneered a deep respect for the planet and for more sensible approaches for how we could live on it: “We are true time scouts finding places now for what will be needed then.”

Bill asked: “Are we the public or the private person?” The truth of the matter is that for all seasons we are both. Perceived as challenging, a huge harvester of great ideas from around the world (and not always crediting their sources) Bill was also a sensitive man, eloquent raconteur, poet and appreciative of the poetry of others. He knew how to provoke others to action, but also when to withdraw and let others carry on the work. He paraphrased Lao Tzu: “True change is to so change things that it seems natural to everybody but no-one knows who thought of it.” And: “Our best will not be our children’s best.”

Though often outwardly gruff and challenging there was real heart to everything he did.

Bill Mollison founded the first and original Permaculture Institute, which was established in 1979 to teach the practical design of sustainable soil, water, plant, and legal and economic systems to students worldwide. Bill’s legacy is that hundreds of thousands of past students have created a world-wide network to take his concept forward. This is a world in which we are acutely aware of our environment, its capacity and its limitations, and we design systems to meet human needs which respect that.

Bill spent his final years in Sisters Beach, Tasmania. The final words must go to him in true classical tone:

“If you hear that I am dead tell them they lie.“

Bill lives on in our hearts and minds, in his wisdom, vision, teachings, books, scope of understanding and as an example of how to live, giving so much.

In appreciation and love,

Lee
 
Miles Flansburg
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Time to look for that very special tree to plant for Bill.
 
Kyrt Ryder
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Forget one tree. This is the year I start guerilla foresting with edible, nectary and N-fixing trees/shrubs.

Thanks for everything you taught us Bill, especially in terms of perspective and connections between elements.
 
Bede Carroll
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One of the most significant Australians of the modern era has passed away and barely a whisper in the local media.

I guess there's no room when we have important things to discuss like Brangelina and who's wearing what to the domestic football awards night.

It's no wonder we need people like Bill.
 
Destiny Hagest
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Found this really nice piece over on Resilience:

http://www.resilience.org/stories/2016-09-25/bruce-charles-bill-mollison-1928-2016-co-founder-of-permaculture

If you decide to plant a tree in Bill's memory, they're asking that you please use the hashtag #PlantedForBill, so we can see how people the world over came to love and respect his work.
 
Rudy Valvano
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I heard the news on the Permaculture Voices podcast. Could someone please mention it on the Dailyish Email?
 
Destiny Hagest
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Rudy Valvano wrote:I heard the news on the Permaculture Voices podcast. Could someone please mention it on the Dailyish Email?


I actually just drafted one up with a bunch of links to Bill things for tomorrow.
 
Dana Martin
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I feel like i have lost a great friend that i have never had the pleasure to meet. I will try to make him proud!
 
Destiny Hagest
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Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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I have a small walnut tree, grown out of a walnut I found last year. I will plant that in a nice place. Probably close to the community garden of Permacultuur Meppel. And then I'll make photos.
 
Joy Oasis
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So sorry to hear about his passing. I just got some Kakadu Plum seeds from Australia (they are extremely high in vitamin C), so it will be the most fitting plant for me to plant in Bill Mollison's honor.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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