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Where is permaculture for the elderly?

 
pollinator
Posts: 767
Location: Western MA, zone 6b
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I wonder how this ties in to lowering birth rates and smaller families.   Theoretically that could leave many elders with a very small pool of help/care into elder years.  My ex and I, for example only had one child.    She has no children.   I can't imagine her attempting to meet our care needs on her own even partially.  That is a much different scenario than when it was the "norm" for a couple to have multiple children, with ever expanding number of grandchildren.  I guess that is when community needs to somehow replace biological family.   We are so monetary focussed here in the US the solution always seems to be throwing more money at "services" and squeezing in as many people for the smallest bottom line possible.  It's not a good model when we look at quality of life/end of life.
 
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My approach is toward a sustainable community, there should be more than one of these coming into being, with more independence, to grow to, from civilization that is around virtually everywhere. For it to be sustainable in fact with subsistence living with what is on the land the community uses, growing all useful things those there can, it needs to have accommodation for the elderly there, as it should continue with sustainability, and all do age, I will age and grow less able with being elderly, however well I take care of myself, as I do. Communities of humanity always continued this way, before civilization and in places apart from civilization, it is important to our continuation, and there is contribution to structure with this way.
 
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Location: NC zone 7a
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chicken
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We bought our property out in the sticks for a few reasons. The small subdivision we lived in wasn't bad as far as the CCRs went. It was the clique of the first people who built there. We got tired of the constant whining and complaining and 'special treatment '.

The codo we had owned was not as bad, but you have to deal with other residents on a closer basis. No yards in between. Just walls. Nice large yard areas that kids weren't allowed to play in. And they weren't allowed to play in the parking area. Why allow kids?

Out here on our acreage we went solar. While we were building we seriously considered hooking up to the grid. That got nixed because  it was an electric co-op and their requirements are ridiculous. We considered it a couple more times and just couldn't bring ourselves to sign that agreement.

When we first came to the state we checked out one of those all-in-one communities.  But you have no choice but to pay-in to all the services and if you're not a people person forget it. They assured us we would learn to love the social gatherings etc. They're fun! Even group trips! WHATever!

So being older and retired we didn't want to be locked in to anybody's rules and regs and lifetime fees. Ugh! We wanted peace and quiet and nobody for the most part telling us what to do. There is the county though.

If you're old enough to remember communes, they worked pretty well. But my idea of a modified elderly commune would be like mentioned above. A version of tiny homes but not so tiny and everyone owns their own lot. Whether that lot is acres or just a lot.

People change. People may have friends that aren't so desirable. Having rules can eliminate certain issues but can also cause problems. So we moved into a very small rural farming community.  And it's awesome.

All of our neighbors stopped by to say hi when they'd catch us outside. We had a mechanical issue and were pulled off the road with our heads under the hood. 6 different people stopped and asked if we were OK or needed help..

Nobody bothers us and they don't expect to have a midday coffee clatch. We all have work to do or want to be left alone! It's grand.




 
pollinator
Posts: 305
Location: New Mexico USA zone 6
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K Carpenter wrote:We bought our property out in the sticks for a few reasons.  
...
All of our neighbors stopped by to say hi when they'd catch us outside. We had a mechanical issue and were pulled off the road with our heads under the hood. 6 different people stopped and asked if we were OK or needed help..
Nobody bothers us and they don't expect to have a midday coffee clatch. We all have work to do or want to be left alone! It's grand.



This is very much like where I live and the reason I never want to leave here.  In my case people respect my desire for privacy and don't come visiting without knowing it's OK by me.  Not long after we moved here, my truck broke down on a back road and after an hour some guys stopped to see what help I needed and ended up driving me 17 miles out of their way to drop me off at my door.  They were complete strangers to me at the time.  Nobody thought it was an unusual thing to do.

This lovely community grew organically, though I took it upon myself to start a Facebook group for just the people who live in our area -- basically that's anyone within about a 100 square mile area.  There are 36 people in the group including me.  People share stuff like weather warnings, photos, lost dogs, who wants some zuccini or who'd got eggs for sale, is the phone down for everybody or only a few, anybody willing to come over with a tractor to move some dirt, etc.  

Most of us are senior citizens, but lately some younger people have moved in.  I hope they stay.  

[photo is just because I like sharing my photography]

PXL_20220826_RainyDay_LifStrandPhoto_162632028-1s-.png
A rainy day in western New Mexico
A rainy day in western New Mexico
 
gardener
Posts: 3099
Location: Cascades of Oregon
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Thinking about the inevitable deterioration of strength and eventual mortality. Just how many seasons/gardens are there going to be. When in my thirties It was far in the future. As i age my gardens will get smaller, I imagine. I hope that my efforts in applying some of the things I have learned here and from others make or has made the effort of living easier, so that might help stretch it out a bit.  When I think about how many growing seasons are left for me I realize I need to double my efforts.
 
Posts: 1670
Location: Fennville MI
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Robert Ray, I surely hear you. At sixty I retired and bought twenty acres for my forever home. As I work on transforming our woodland into a place for humans to live along with everything else, I am very much aware that many of my plans are unlikely to mature within my time here. Sometimes that can be a difficult thought. Mostly it’s a reason to ramp up tree planting ;)
 
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Lif Strand wrote:

K Carpenter wrote:We bought our property out in the sticks for a few reasons.  
...
All of our neighbors stopped by to say hi when they'd catch us outside. We had a mechanical issue and were pulled off the road with our heads under the hood. 6 different people stopped and asked if we were OK or needed help..
Nobody bothers us and they don't expect to have a midday coffee clatch. We all have work to do or want to be left alone! It's grand.



This is very much like where I live and the reason I never want to leave here.  In my case people respect my desire for privacy and don't come visiting without knowing it's OK by me.  Not long after we moved here, my truck broke down on a back road and after an hour some guys stopped to see what help I needed and ended up driving me 17 miles out of their way to drop me off at my door.  They were complete strangers to me at the time.  Nobody thought it was an unusual thing to do.

This lovely community grew organically, though I took it upon myself to start a Facebook group for just the people who live in our area -- basically that's anyone within about a 100 square mile area.  There are 36 people in the group including me.  People share stuff like weather warnings, photos, lost dogs, who wants some zuccini or who'd got eggs for sale, is the phone down for everybody or only a few, anybody willing to come over with a tractor to move some dirt, etc.  

Most of us are senior citizens, but lately some younger people have moved in.  I hope they stay.  

[photo is just because I like sharing my photography]



Heading to NM next week looking for some property for me and some friends.  Am interested in your FB group and any insights you can pass on about NM living.

Dave
 
Fred Frank V Bur
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I want for a community what human communities had from the earliest, people of different generations integrated, not younger and not older segregated to their own community, and all in a community working together and being a help to others in their community as they have needs, which will happen to any. This is how to have a community.
 
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Nice thread. Why did it stop?
 
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did tis ever get off the ground?
 
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