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What are your favourite homemade tea blends?

 
steward
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:

Montana Gold-ish
A lovely, warming blend, perfect for fall and winter. Though I actually like it year-round.
Also, I typically do not like rooibos, but I like it in this blend. Somehow, it's just the perfect base for these spices.
Note:  even if you don't like powdered or liquid stevia, you might like the dried *leaf* of stevia in this.

1 cup rooibos
1 cup cinnamon stick pieces (crush or break up cinnamon sticks)
1 tsp ground cloves
3 T. orange peel
1/2 cup stevia leaves

Optional
If adding both lemon flavored items, maybe use the lesser quantity of each.
I forgot to write down my quantities on these, so add to your taste or liking.
2 T. to 1/4 cup lemon grass, optional
2 T. to 1/4 cup lemon balm, optional
1/4 cup nettle, optional


I was out of rooibos, but wanted this tea, so I used rose hips, and added a touch of cardamom.

I liked it!
 
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My favorite blend is turmeric and ginger. Love it so much, this kind of green tea is good for inflammation too! So win win
 
steward
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Hi Alice,

I just tried it.  It is great!
 
pollinator
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Earl grey was always my favourite tea, but I stay away from caffeine now and miss it☹️

Once I got some bergamot (monarda) growing here, I started drying that for tea. It's got the earl grey aroma and a bit of the citrusy flavour.

Last year I started playing around with fermenting different things for tea, like you do with fireweed. This year I tried fermenting bergamot and had my first cup this morning. It was rich and smooth and quite like actual tea. But it had lost the brightness. So mixed some regular dried bergamot with some fermented dried bergamot, and oh boy. This is it. I'm not saying it's earl grey, but it ticks a lot of the boxes and it's absolutely delicious. I need to grow more bergamot!
 
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Lately, I've been enjoying raspberry/blackberry leaf tea and lilac flower tea. Since I have a sweet tooth, I tend to add in some honey too!
 
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I've enjoyed watching my 9 year old make her own teas.  She harvests lemon balm, mint, and Holy Basil (Tulsi). Then she dries them, crushed them and puts them in our tea cupboard. I'm so happy she is learning these skills at her age, where as I was in my 30s before I started learning about these things. I was hopeful she would try chamomile tea this year, but the chamomile barely came up this year.
So lemon balm, mint, and tulsi are our favorite homegrown, homemade blends. I like the lemon balm with mint best.
 
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Vida Norris wrote:

Right now I'm drinking nettles, lemon balm and oatstraw.

I love hibiscus, catnip and chamomile for relaxation.



That's cool Matu. I had to look up oatstraw, looks like a really interesting plant! What's the flavour of it like?


So far, and I only started last year, I've made red clover and catnip. I just pinched some and steeped. I can't say I enjoyed either one as a tea especially the catnip to me was undrinkable.



I know what you mean Aaron. I had a similar experience with St. Johns Wort. I harvested a bunch and it smelled soooo good, but when I made it into a tea it didn't taste like much at all. I feel like there must be a way to make it nice though, so have to keep playing with ratios. I haven't tried catnip yet, although I've got it growing in the garden. Will have to harvest that this summer. I did scoop up a bunch of red clover. It was okay, I can see it being really nice with honey.

I tend to just add mint to everything if I have any doubts, since I am a bit of a mint-o-holic and it's an easy win since the strong flavor takes over any not so fun ones.



Mint is my favorite to add to blends. My favorite, at the moment, is mint with chamomile and a little lavender. It's very calming.
 
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I have a blend I call my "Nerve Tonic"

It contains green jasmine pearls, chamomile, oatstraw maybe some lavender (I forget, it's been awhile since I made a batch..but my canister is getting low..)

Then I add honey to the brew. The jasmine pearls help neutralize the hay flavors
 
pollinator
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Vida Norris wrote:

I tend to just add mint to everything if I have any doubts, since I am a bit of a mint-o-holic and it's an easy win since the strong flavor takes over any not so fun ones.



Try licorice root.  It's pleasant tasting, adds a natural sweetness, and imparts a very strong taste.  I usually use it very judiciously for that reason.  A slightly larger amount is guaranteed to dominate any other flavors you might wish to cover up!

 
Jan White
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Lately I've really been enjoying birch leaf tea. I picked the leaves first thing in the spring, just as they were fully open, but before they started to really grow.  The leaves were very sticky.

The tea is bright and tanniny and I didn't pick enough!
SIMG_2041.jpg
[Thumbnail for SIMG_2041.jpg]
 
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Hi I was wondering if you would be willing to share your recipe for evening in missoula  tea?

thank you

Cindy
 
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Wow Cindy!  I was just about to ask Jocelyn the same thing.  I love Evening in Missoula!

My favorite home blend we call " Let That Shit Go" which is heavy on Tulsi with calendula, chocolate mint and Motherwort.
 
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I always go back to Ivan-chai (fermented fireweed) blends, but today circumstances require me to survive on raspberry leaf with rooibos. Here’s a fresh batch on an unlucky design draft. The color is as enjoyable as the flavor.
ACA812EE-394D-49E5-B2F6-028F23E65032.jpeg
[Thumbnail for ACA812EE-394D-49E5-B2F6-028F23E65032.jpeg]
 
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I make a blend I call Hangover Helper, good for belly upsets of any cause: mint, chamomile, fennel seed and lavender. The last is not critical, I include it because of the old notion that it calms "a simmering braine" and sometime migraines are a reason I drink this. The fennel is important, I try to keep a fennel plant going all the time. They are hostile to other plants however, so ideally you keep them outside the garden. You can get a quart of seed off a good one and they are frost tolerant and don';t seem to mind wet or dry periods. If I go to bed with heartburn I might take a pinch of fennel seeds to just chew, never mind brewing tea. It's usually pretty immediately effective. The interesting thing is that all these stomach soothers (including caraway, a fennel relative) are tasty, pleasantly aromatic.
 
steward
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Mary Cook wrote:I make a blend I call Hangover Helper, good for belly upsets of any cause: mint, chamomile, fennel seed and lavender. The last is not critical, I include it because of the old notion that it calms "a simmering braine" and sometime migraines are a reason I drink this. The fennel is important, I try to keep a fennel plant going all the time. They are hostile to other plants however, so ideally you keep them outside the garden. You can get a quart of seed off a good one and they are frost tolerant and don';t seem to mind wet or dry periods. If I go to bed with heartburn I might take a pinch of fennel seeds to just chew, never mind brewing tea. It's usually pretty immediately effective. The interesting thing is that all these stomach soothers (including caraway, a fennel relative) are tasty, pleasantly aromatic.


If you struggle with migraines, try adding a good amount of feverfew, and drink it, daily. It won't necessarily eliminate them, but it will cut way back on the frequency and severity.
 
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If you struggle with migraines, try adding a good amount of feverfew, and drink it, daily. It won't necessarily eliminate them, but it will cut way back on the frequency and severity.

I read somewhere, that it took one lady 14 months of daily 2-3 feverfew leaf eating to fully eliminate migraines, although she could see reduction at a month or two. I never had enough patience to try. Migraine is tricky, you need to start taking things at the first sign of coming migraine. Ifyou happen to be asleep when that happens or do not have herbals with you, you might miss the window of opportunity.
 
Joy Oasis
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I am experimenting with fresh herbs and today made tea with 3 cups of water, a handful of each : citrus lime flowers, calendula flowers, and 5 sprigs of mint (I think spearmint or similar mint). After 5 minute steeping it was too weak, after 10 better, after 15min much better, but after 1.5 hours best. It takes much longer for fresh herbs to infuse, but they do have freshness taste that dry herbs do not.  I probably should have added double or tripple more herbs, then maybe it would have infused to enough taste faster.
 
Carla Burke
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Joy Oasis wrote:
I read somewhere, that it took one lady 14 months of daily 2-3 feverfew leaf eating to fully eliminate migraines, although she could see reduction at a month or two. I never had enough patience to try. Migraine is tricky, you need to start taking things at the first sign of coming migraine. Ifyou happen to be asleep when that happens or do not have herbals with you, you might miss the window of opportunity.



I'm not surprised her results were so poor. To make an effective medicinal tea, the ratio recommended (by well- known, highly reputable) clinical herbalists, is 1oz by weight of dried herb, to 1qt of water, at a near-boil, steeped until it cools. Strain, pressing all the liquid out of the herb. To use, drink 1C daily, sweetened with honey, monkfruit, or stevia.
 
Joy Oasis
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Carla Burke wrote:

I'm not surprised her results were so poor. To make an effective medicinal tea, the ratio recommended (by well- known, highly reputable) clinical herbalists, is 1oz by weight of dried herb, to 1qt of water, at a near-boil, steeped until it cools. Strain, pressing all the liquid out of the herb. To use, drink 1C daily, sweetened with honey, monkfruit, or stevia.



Thank you. I have known that 1 ounce dried herb per quart is used for nutritive infusions. But you are saying that it is ok for feverfew, but to drink only 1 cup instead of all four cups, and steep only until it cools instead of overnight. I will have to try that. I think fresh feverfew probably would be more effective for this tea. I find feverfew tincture made with fresh herb also effective (even stopping migraine if started in early satge and taken in teaspoon amounts), just never have enough patience to do it daily. I will try to make tea with dried and fresh separately and see how it goes. Thank you so much.
 
Carla Burke
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Joy Oasis wrote:Thank you. I have known that 1 ounce dried herb per quart is used for nutritive infusions. But you are saying that it is ok for feverfew, but to drink only 1 cup instead of all four cups, and steep only until it cools instead of overnight. I will have to try that. I think fresh feverfew probably would be more effective for this tea. I find feverfew tincture made with fresh herb also effective (even stopping migraine if started in early satge and taken in teaspoon amounts), just never have enough patience to do it daily. I will try to make tea with dried and fresh separately and see how it goes. Thank you so much.



Happy to help! Just keep in mind that 1oz of dried herb will be substantially more potent than 1oz fresh, so it would be a good idea to almost double that weight, for fresh.
 
Jan White
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I don't know if anyone's mentioned this yet, but lemon thyme makes a really nice tea. I've just got one plant right now, but have a few cuttings rooted, so hopefully I'll be able to drink all the tea I want soon!
 
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I've been making my own version of a golden tea in the evenings with ginger, turmeric, cinnamon, lemon juice, honey or molasses, and a tiny dash of black pepper. We've been using turmeric to great effect to help ease my husband's symptoms from Chrohn's disease, we use it also in cooking but about 1/4 to 1/3 tsp in his tea seems to be a good minimum daily dose for now. I use roughly equal proportions of turmeric, cinnamon and ginger, and everything else is to taste. This tea has a bright & warming flavor.

If the weather is too warm to want hot tea, I will leave out the lemon, steep all the rest in a small bit of hot water in the bottom of a pint jar and then add ice, cold water and a bit of cream or plant-milk, close and shake for an "iced chai" version. Be warned, the lemon and the cream do not play nicely together, as the cream will curdle from the acid, so its best to leave out the lemon juice if you add milk or cream. With that change, this version has a less bright flavor, but it is very comforting and delicious. If you like iced coffees or chai lattes you would probably enjoy it a lot.
 
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