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ISO easy cracker recipes (grain free or gluten free a plus!)  RSS feed

 
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I'm tired of paying too much for crackers that still contain things I'd rather not have right now, like corn, palm oil, or non-organic ingredients.

I have fallen in love with these crackers, though Paul does not like them as much as I do:

Jocelyn Campbell wrote:These crackers are SO easy. The hardest part is spreading them out on the pan, which just takes a tiny bit of patience is all.

Simply mix together the seeds, water and seasonings; let sit, spread, and bake. No food processor, no blender--easy-peasy!!

Easy home made five seed crackers

This is a glorious picture from that recipe/blog post, not mine:


I made them for a dinner party where we invited over some permaculture friends. 4 out of 5 guests asked for the recipe. That has been the consistent reaction - almost everyone wants the recipe!!


For some reason, making crackers is kind of intimidating to me. So I was genuinely surprised at how easy these are to make.

I'd love to hear what other cracker successes permies have had.

Do you make seed crackers that you like?

Have any cassava flour, or gluten- or grain-free recipes to share?

 
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I have made these several times.  The base is almond flour though I imagine other nut or seed flours would work as well.  https://www.genaw.com/lowcarb/almond_thins.html. I skip the sweetener and vary the seasonings.
 
pollinator
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I modified a couple other recipes into this recipe for my dad who could only eat oats and some nuts (GF).  I think they taste a lot like Wheat Thins:

1 c. gf quick oats
1/2 c. almonds
1/2 c. brazil nuts
1 tsp. salt
up to 1/4 c. warm water

1. Process oats, then almonds and brazil nuts in the food processor until fine.
2. Mix thoroughly with salt
3. Add water, a little at a time and mix until ball forms
4. Flatten between parchment paper on cookie sheet (as thick as you like your crackers)
5. Cut into squares.
6. Bake at 350 for about 15 mins or until edges are golden brown.
7. Turn off oven.  Open for about a minute.   Close w/crackers in the oven for another 2 minutes.
8. Cool completely and serve or freeze in air tight container.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Ooh, those both look excellent! Somehow, I seem to have run across a lot of recipes online where all the commenters rave about the recipe but haven’t tried it. So it's great to hear about ones that work and your own modifications - thanks!
 
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Don't have a recipe, but something based on chestnuts flour would taste great! Easier to digets that almonds or other nuts, much less anti nutrients (almonds are great as an "extra", not as a staple in my opinion), more carbs (this is usually what most people like in crackers), and growing in slightly cooler region than almonds. I've tasted crackers based on rice and chestnuts flour, super delicious, but not cheap.
You could also bake an italian cake called "nocciola" I think it was called, based on chestnut flour. The italians know quite a lot about chestnuts... I believe chestnuts are the most satisfying cooked carbs out there. Easy to grow (but takes a loooong time before the trees start to produce nuts), but maybe a bit of work to peel them....still, this stuff grows on trees...! Just pick them.
 
Lana Weldon
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btw, seeds are not good as a staple, should be used VERY sparingly, full of anti-nutrients. We are not birds and do not have the same digestion as birds. Their faeces is white btw...! No, but seriously, seeds are great as an extra ingredient, not a staple.
 
Sonja Draven
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:Ooh, those both look excellent! Somehow, I seem to have run across a lot of recipes online where all the commenters rave about the recipe but haven’t tried it.


SO true.  Some of the food blogs I used to frequent seemed to attract people for "food porn" more than serious cooks (oooh, these look so good - I'll have to try them!! comments without any real intention of making them as evidenced by no actual follow-up comments about how they turned out) and I've stepped back from those.  My favorite sites now mostly have lots of comments of "I made this and it was great" or "I made this and this is how I modified it" and often those modifications are more helpful because they took out the oil or gluten or whatever I don't eat and saved me the work.

Good luck with your cracker search, Jocelyn and I look forward to hearing what works for you and Paul!
 
Sonja Draven
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Lana Weldon wrote:btw, seeds are not good as a staple, should be used VERY sparingly, full of anti-nutrients. We are not birds and do not have the same digestion as birds. Their faeces is white btw...! No, but seriously, seeds are great as an extra ingredient, not a staple.


Lana, it might be good to word this as a suggestion rather than a "truth" since the facts and data that people accept about diet vary so much.  While you accept that this is true, many people (especially raw foodies) would very vehemently disagree with you.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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I do understand your points about seeds and almonds, Lana. The seeds in the OP recipe are briefly soaked, though I do know some people never eat seeds, nuts or grains without soaking or sprouting them first to remove the anti-nutrients. I've been using seeds on a daily basis to reduce hot flashes (more info here - though I think we had a better discussion elsewhere that I can't seem to find now), so I suppose one could say I find them medicinally helpful.

I'm so busy making sure other nutritional needs are met that I don't always take the time to soak and sprout. :-/

Plus, I do agree that chestnuts might be ideal! We don't usually have those available here, and when they are, I think they are $16 per pound (or thereabouts) with the shell on.

I'm still interested in recipes, too!
 
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I like to make sourdough crackers.

I get around a cup of sourdough bread dough, knead in four tablespoons of butter or lard, then add as much flour as is needed to make a dry dough that can be rolled out.

You can make these gluten-free by first making a gluten-free sourdough starter by getting some existing rye or wheat sourdough starter, putting it in the bottom of a jar, then in a separate bowl mixing up some gluten-free flour (such as half buckwheat flour and half rice flour) with some water to form a batter, then putting this on top of the old sourdough but not mixing it in - in around 12 hours the yeast will transfer to the gluten-free batter, you can take a little off the top and mix it with more gf flour and water to make more starter, and then mixing this starter with more water and plenty of flour to make a kneadable dough.
 
Lana Weldon
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A lot former rawfoodists will say how bad they felt after a longer time, when eating too much nuts and seeds. It's possible to do it for quite some time before the body reacts, or before you realise that actually you're not feeling good.
I've had quite a lot contact with former rawfoodists... And there's a lot of them, but not always visible out there. Rawfoodism is a bit of a trend, some people are just "hobby rawfoodists", going raw once in a while and feeling the benefits (of course), but doing it 100% with a lot of nuts and seeds for years? Ask those who've really done it. It's not optimal food for us.
 
Lana Weldon
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Cooked nuts and seeds mights be maybe a bit more digestible, but even there, should also be used very sparingly.
Btw, cashews can't be eaten raw, they are always steamed before being sold (otherwise they would be inedible/poisonous).
Not only bitter almonds are poisonous, but even sweet almonds have some poison in them. Soaking might make things a bit less worse, but it's not optimal food for us.
 
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Alice Friedeman's book Crunch! is awesome.  Her website has the basic cracker recipe (and lots of others) on it, and you can tweak it however you want, but the book has some good ideas.

Our favourite version was pretty close to the basic cracker, but with chickpea flour instead of wheat.  For seeds, mostly sesame, some flax.  Lots of black pepper.  I'd fill up a gallon jar with these every week or so  - back when we had an oven. Sigh.

The only thing with her crackers is you need a silicon baking sheet.  I really don't like using silicon baking stuff, but her crackers are so tasty and quick and easy, that I made my peace with it.

The basic Alice cracker

300° F    30 minutes total baking time, scoring after 10 minutes

2/3 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 Teaspoon salt
1/4 Teaspoon black pepper
1 Tablespoon black sesame seeds  (or flax, poppy, white sesame, or chia seeds)
3/4  cup water

Instructions

Preheat oven to 300° F.  Mix dry ingredients very well, add water and mix well.  Then immediately pour watery battery onto silicone mat, tilting pan, and using spatula to spread.
Bake for 10 minutes.
Remove from oven, score batter with spatula  or fluted pastry cutter
Return to 300° oven and bake another 20 minutes.
After 20 minutes, turn oven off, and wait 30 minutes before removing pan from oven.
Check to see if crackers done; done crackers will not be moist, soft, or bend.
If crackers are not done, reset the oven to 250°, put the crackers back in the oven and after 5 minutes, turn the oven off, waiting 30 more minutes before opening it and taking the crackers out to see if they are now done.

 
Sonja Draven
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Jan, if you haven't tried parchment paper instead of silicon baking sheet, you might look into that.  Being gf and oil-free in my baking means that I need a no-stick liner usually and that tends to work well and seems more environmentally / health friendly.  I know it may not work for all the things you're doing.
 
Jan White
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Good suggestion, Sonja, if anyone else tries those crackers. I actually don't remember if I ever tried parchment or not. I used it for other things so always had t on hand, but who knows! Definitely worth a try.
 
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in my country Viet Nam
Now everyone is busy with work like making money, family meals are becoming over-hyped, less noticed, and people just eat for lunch, the connection between members of the family. Pass the meal as little ...
 
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Sonja Draven wrote:Jan, if you haven't tried parchment paper instead of silicon baking sheet, you might look into that.  Being gf and oil-free in my baking means that I need a no-stick liner usually and that tends to work well and seems more environmentally / health friendly.  I know it may not work for all the things you're doing.



Another option might be a smooth silicone baking sheet, if you don't already have one. I made freezer-fudge and paleo peanut brittle, and they stick to the popular silpat silicone baking sheets. So, I bought some smooth silicone sheets.

I actually ended up getting these silicone placemats because (1) they're mostly clear and so I could tell they didn't put weird fillers in the silicone, (2) They double as fund placemats/coloring sheets for my kids, and (3) they were only $6.99!
 
Nicole Alderman
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I made this recipe SCD legal, Paleo pizza crust . It uses almond flour, egg, cheese and some seasonings and oil. It was quite tasty, and I'm thinking it might make a great cracker, too. If I have time tomorrow, I'll give it a whirl!
 
Nicole Alderman
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Just wanted to update on the recipe I posted. I did turn it into crackers, and it DID turn out amazing. In fact, it's the first gluten-free (and Paleo) cracker/cookie recipe that EVERYONE in my family loved. When cooked to done-but-not-brown, it tastes and feels just like a breadsticks (which is what I'm going to try transforming it into next). When cooked to a light brown, it's a very nice cracker.

This is now one of my family's favorite recipes!
 
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I like to make acorn flour crackers and also use the basic recipe to use whatever flour I have on hand.  We're GF too, so all the crackers I make are GF.

I posted a pic of a batch of acorn flour crackers (mixed with other GF flours) on Instagram recently and folks asked for the recipe.  This is the reply I typed up, if it's helpful.  I don't use a recipe for crackers and do it more the grandma way of toss in this and a bit of this.  :)

Anyway, this is the basic recipe that I posted....

The thing I like about making crackers is that you don't need a recipe-- just use flours, seasonings, water, a little olive oil (optional) and whatever suits your tastes. You can roll them and cut them with a pizza wheel or leave them in a sheet and break them up after baking or shape them into little circles or whatever. Dot them with the tines of a fork to help them bake evenly and not bubble up. Bake in a low oven on a greased baking sheet until golden and dried (time varies by how thick they are, how much liquid and so on-- these took about 20 minutes). I have a basic recipe and more instructions in my acorn foraging book (affiliate link) but it really is simple.

These were acorn flour, buckwheat flour, brown rice flour, dried roasted tomato skins and chives from last summer's garden, garlic, nutritional yeast, salt, pepper, olive oil, water. Daryl and the kids loved them. Rhia said she liked the way the sweetness of the acorn flour comes through first and then the garlic and spice comes through.

At my acorn presentation last month I brought acorn crackers that were much more basic. It's all up to you. Healthy, simple, thrifty and delicious.




acorn-buckwheat-crackers.jpg
[Thumbnail for acorn-buckwheat-crackers.jpg]
 
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Wow, so many great ideas!   Nicole, I appreciate your family's assessment : )  I'll probably start with that recipe, as I have the almond flour ;)
 
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Lana Weldon wrote:
Btw, cashews can't be eaten raw, they are always steamed before being sold (otherwise they would be inedible/poisonous).



The poison in the cashew is actually a coating in the shell. The chemical is like the one in poison oak. So it is hard to crack one and get the seed out without getting the resin on the seed. I did hear of one company that found a way to do it without having to remove the resin first— why they are cooked. As far as I know they have kept the secret and are a monopoly on a true raw cashew.  So those cashews can be eaten raw and the only thing poisonous would be the anti nutrients found in other seeds. I knew some raw foodists that would seek those out so they could soak them for 12 hours before making cashew cheese.

 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Jan White wrote:Alice Friedeman's book Crunch! is awesome.  Her website has the basic cracker recipe (and lots of others) on it, and you can tweak it however you want, but the book has some good ideas.

Our favourite version was pretty close to the basic cracker, but with chickpea flour instead of wheat.  For seeds, mostly sesame, some flax.  Lots of black pepper.  I'd fill up a gallon jar with these every week or so  - back when we had an oven. Sigh.

The only thing with her crackers is you need a silicon baking sheet.  I really don't like using silicon baking stuff, but her crackers are so tasty and quick and easy, that I made my peace with it.

The basic Alice cracker

300° F    30 minutes total baking time, scoring after 10 minutes

2/3 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 Teaspoon salt
1/4 Teaspoon black pepper
1 Tablespoon black sesame seeds  (or flax, poppy, white sesame, or chia seeds)
3/4  cup water

Instructions

Preheat oven to 300° F.  Mix dry ingredients very well, add water and mix well.  Then immediately pour watery battery onto silicone mat, tilting pan, and using spatula to spread.
Bake for 10 minutes.
Remove from oven, score batter with spatula  or fluted pastry cutter
Return to 300° oven and bake another 20 minutes.
After 20 minutes, turn oven off, and wait 30 minutes before removing pan from oven.
Check to see if crackers done; done crackers will not be moist, soft, or bend.
If crackers are not done, reset the oven to 250°, put the crackers back in the oven and after 5 minutes, turn the oven off, waiting 30 more minutes before opening it and taking the crackers out to see if they are now done.



I tried this today - with cassava flour in place of whole wheat flour. And I have 3 thoughts about it.

1. Still *very* (too?)  runny with cassava flour! Some times cassava flour sucks up more moisture  (not quite like coconut flour, but some), so I did two scant 1/3rd cups. Used black sesame seeds which didn't thicken at all either.

2. Warped pans are difficult! ALL of my baking sheets are warped which made it really, really difficult to spread evenly, despite the silpat texture attempting to grab it a bit. My batter was too liquid. I actually poured it out of the pan, back into the bowl, and added 3/4 teaspoons chia to try to thicken a bit.

Outer crackers were done - almost too done; but the middle crackers were not - had to put those back in per the instructions

3. I want to try again with oil in place of part of the water measure. I just stayed with one substitution to start! :-)

Not my favorite this combo as I tried it, and Paul was not impressed, though I will likely try again. The cassava might benefit from some sitting before pouring or not reducing the measure slightly like I thought, or from more chia or flax seed to thicken it.

Edited to add some pictures. My phone camera lens is scratched, so I tried our cheap tablet, which I learned has a cheap camera...so these are a bit glare-ish.

cassava-sesame-crackers-outer.jpg
[Thumbnail for cassava-sesame-crackers-outer.jpg]
cassava-sesame-crackers-middle.jpg
[Thumbnail for cassava-sesame-crackers-middle.jpg]
 
Nicole Alderman
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nancy sutton wrote:Wow, so many great ideas!   Nicole, I appreciate your family's assessment : )  I'll probably start with that recipe, as I have the almond flour ;)



Did you try them out? I'm really enjoying how versatile this recipe is. Depending on what cheese you use,  it gets a slightly different texture and flavor. My favorite is 1/2 Parmesan and 1/2 sharp cheddar. The Parmesan mixes in and the bits of cheddar kind of bakes like cheese on a pizza, making little visible flakes of cheesy goodness. The last time I made it, we just used 100% Romano. It was good, but not as good as the other mix.

I also tried making them into breadsticks, too. They became quite nice hard breadsticks for dipping and eating outright. I'm going to try experimenting with baking temps for a softer breadstick. But, since my mom is making breadsticks as part of our Christmas dinner, I'll be bringing these to share and to eat so we have breadsticks we can eat, too!
 
nancy sutton
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Not yet, Nicole... I tend to creep (slowly) up on a new experiment.... will post here when I do.  The cheese additions cinched it! : )
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Nicole, I almost tried your recipe, though Paul and I are both avoiding dairy cheeses at the moment. I'm wondering if it might work with a vegan ricotta or vegan cream cheese - which is a much softer cheese than a cheddar or mozzarella.

Plus, I'm out of almond flour at the moment. It's hard to find organic almond flour and we are trying to eat organic or better. I've recently found loads of organic cassava flour, and while it's higher carb/starch than almond, and lower in protein and fats, it has a gluey-ness that is reminiscent of gluten, so it's been really fun to work with. I might have to try making a meal/flour out of some hazelnuts I have in the freezer...that might be a nice almond flour substitute.

 
Nicole Alderman
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I got lucky because Grocery Outlet has blanched almond flour (I'll have to double-check to see if it's organic) in 4 pound bags for $9.99. That's a lot of calories and protein for than amount of almond flour. I looked up the brand on amazon, and that bag is usually $24.99! I need to go pick up some more!

I haven't tried it with a softer cheese yet, but it worth a go. I've never cooked with vegan cheeses, but if they melt and stick to the flour, they might work?
 
Jan White
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:
I tried this today - with cassava flour in place of whole wheat flour. And I have 3 thoughts about it.

1. Still *very* (too?)  runny with cassava flour! Some times cassava flour sucks up more moisture  (not quite like coconut flour, but some), so I did two scant 1/3rd cups. Used black sesame seeds which didn't thicken at all either.

2. Warped pans are difficult! ALL of my baking sheets are warped which made it really, really difficult to spread evenly, despite the silpat texture attempting to grab it a bit. My batter was too liquid. I actually poured it out of the pan, back into the bowl, and added 3/4 teaspoons chia to try to thicken a bit.

Outer crackers were done - almost too done; but the middle crackers were not - had to put those back in per the instructions

3. I want to try again with oil in place of part of the water measure. I just stayed with one substitution to start! :-)



That's really too bad you didn't have good luck with the recipe.  For me, Alice's basic technique was as life changing as Jim Lahey's no knead bread recipe or making lasagna with uncooked noodles.  I'll never bother with another cracker recipe.  It takes fives minutes of prep to get a sheet of crackers in the oven (maybe a bit more if you count the  time your oven takes to preheat), clean up is a quick rinse of a bowl and spatula, and maybe a wipe of the silicone sheet at the very end.

It sounds like your batter was too runny.  I've never used cassava flour, so I don't know how it behaves.  You might need to make them a few times with more or less water until you find out the consistency that works for that type of flour.  When I made her crackers, I'd measure the flour and then add water straight from the tap until it was the right consistency - didn't bother measuring.

I also have warped baking pans (and used the smooth silicone sheets Nicole mentioned above) and never had an issue with the runny batter, which makes me think even more that amount of water in your batter was an issue.

Your oven temperatures might be different than hers as well.  I just flipped through her book and she does suggest some alternate temperatures to try: 375 for the first 8 minutes, then down to 300 for 22 min, then oven off and let sit for 30+ minutes.

Now that I've read that part of the book, I do seem to remember setting a timer for 22 minutes when I made them, so maybe try it out!

And if you didn't like the sesame seeds, try any other seeds you do like.  How about the cassava flour?  Is it a flavour you actually enjoy?  Look on her website for the super seed and grain mixes for the crackers.  My favourite cracker was the chickpea flour one, but I'd make lots of different ones for variety and always had a jar each of seed and grain mix ready to go.

In general, she recommends adding fat to the crackers through seeds, rather than fat or oil.  She does say you can replace 1T of the water with melted fat or oil, if wanted, though.  Or add up to 2T grated cheese to the dry ingredients.  You can also add water to an egg until you've got the 2/3 cup liquid (or whatever amount you've decided works for your flour), and whisk that up before adding to the dry ingredients.  I've never tried any of those, but if you're going to start experimenting, it might be worth trying her "approved" variations first :)  I'd be worried that subbing too much fat for water would give you an unhydrated, oily pile of flour at the end, rather than crackers.

Here's her corn chip recipe from her book:

2/3 cup whole grain corn flour
1T super seed mix
1T whole grain mix
1/2 tsp chili powder
1/2 tsp cumin
1/8 tsp cayenne
1/2 tsp salt

2/3+ cup water



And her curry papadam recipe:

1/3 cup whole grain, rice, or quinoa flour
1/3 cup red lentil or dal flour
1/2-3/4 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp curry powder
1T super seed mix or black sesame
1T whole grain mix

2/3+ cup water



Maybe one of those recipes would work better for you.

I really hope you can make it work, cause there are endless variations once you get the technique down.
 
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Jocelyn, I don't know if you do any juicing, but homemade crackers are a good place to sneak in some of the pulp that's leftover after juicing vegetables. It adds fiber and is generally destined for the compost pile anyway.
 
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