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Rose Hips Galore  RSS feed

 
                            
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Today I was driving past a local grocery store when I realized I was staring at tons of gorgeous rose hips!  I know they are best if they have a frost on them once but in my area they never last that long.  Between the grubs and the heat finding good ones after the frost is a needle in a pile of rose bush thorn type endeavor.

So getting ready to sort the mess out.  I wanted to make dried hips for tea and wanted to try out rose hip jelly.  So here are my questions. 

1.  I know some jelly recipes say just cook the whole thing and smoosh it up but I was hoping someone here could help me try to extract oil from the seeds.

2.  Is there a way to extract the oil without buying some electronic contraption?

3.  Any cool second uses I could do with the left over pulp from the jelly making?  Am guessing it should still be flavorful.  Probably not flavorful enough to dry for tea but, maybe, and maybe there are other ideas.  Maybe save and add to the next loaf of bread I make?  Ideas??
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Location: Ontario, Canada (44.265475, -77.960029)
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Womyn wrote:
1.  I know some jelly recipes say just cook the whole thing and smoosh it up but I was hoping someone here could help me try to extract oil from the seeds.


Smooshing - that's how we make rosehip jelly.  Separating the seeds isn't easy (unless someone has a trick that they'd like to share) because they are very sticky.  I usually save the seeds from a few hips so that I can winter sow them to get plants to add to our own stock of plants.  Try substituting honey for sugar if you want an intense taste like you have rarely, if ever, tasted before. 

2.  Is there a way to extract the oil without buying some electronic contraption?


You might be able to use an oil press expeller such as Piteba or make your own press.

3.  Any cool second uses I could do with the left over pulp from the jelly making?  Am guessing it should still be flavorful.  Probably not flavorful enough to dry for tea but, maybe, and maybe there are other ideas.  Maybe save and add to the next loaf of bread I make?  Ideas??


If you can get the seeds out,  fruit leather.
 
                            
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Awesome thanks!! 
 
Suzy Bean
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Mmmmm...rose hip fruit leather
 
                            
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easy way to make jam:
smash everything, add some water but not too much and cook a little bit, like 20 min. than strain it through cheesecloth, and cook juice untill is jam consistance. it can last 3-4 hours maybe. mix all the time. you'll have great jam than can last for months if its cooked enough.
i never heard somebody use seeds for anything just put them in compost.
offcourse this is for wild rose garden rose hips are similar but maybe taste is not so good. same is for tea.
 
David Egge
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Is there a variety of rose that is most popular for rosehip edibility/useage?
 
            
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Location: Ontario, Canada (44.265475, -77.960029)
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Blackdog wrote:
Is there a variety of rose that is most popular for rosehip edibility/useage?


All roses produce hips but Rosa rugosa is probably the most widely used because of its large hips which are tasty and high in Vitamin C. Rosa canina and rosa gallica are also used although their hips are not as large.
 
                            
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@Blackdog.  This is the rose with the biggest hips.

 
David Egge
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Thanks MikeH and Womyn!

It looks like the Rugosa is hardy for my zone. I'll be planning to put some in next spring.

BD
 
Eric Rummler
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Mike H wrote:
Womyn wrote:


2.  Is there a way to extract the oil without buying some electronic contraption?


You might be able to use an oil press expeller such as Piteba or make your own press.


Just a word about the link "make your own press". It is a simple device but they have the hydraulic jack mounted above the food. If the jack leaks oil & they all do it will drip into your food.

A local welder can make one with the jack on the bottom, much safer.
 
Maria Brown
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The vitamin C content varies according to the process used to preserve rose hips...with drying in a cool, shady spot or freezing (after blanching) being better for saving it than canning.

As for separating the seeds and pulp :

*Simmer the "hip stew" and the skins will burst and pulp will rise to the top and can be skimmed off. Chickens and goats love this.
*Strain the rest through a fine sieve or cheesecloth to remove the seeds.
*Dry them and grind them. Then moisten the "flour" with water and reboil to extract the vitamin E.
*You can use this water for various purposes for its nourishing liquid.
 
Hans Quistorff
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It will be about 3 months before my wild rose hips will be ready. Here is what I did last fall. I used the berry picking scoop we got from Lee Valley catalouge to pick the hips. I quarterd the winter apples and put them in the steam juicer like I do to make apple berry butter and then put the hips on top. With hind sight I am going to put the hips in first this year. The apple hip juice was very good tasting but I wound up using it to get the apple hip pulp to go through the Campion juicer mill to try to extract as much as I could. The resulting apple rose hip butter was hearty but not especialy tasty.
So the plan is hips on the bottom more apples, I have lots of stevia this year so a hand full of that. I will try to get back in November with pictures.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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I never even knew about these! I have heard Destiny mention them on facebook and about how her son loves them, but didn't know what they actually were.

Cool! I will have to keep an eye out.

So are there any varieties of rose you wouldn't want to harvest them from?
 
Mick Fisch
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The best rosehips I have ever had are whatever grows wild in SouthCentral Alaska.  After the first frost they get soft and plump and the seeds soften up, making eating out of hand easier.  They aren't as big as the rosa rugosa, but they are much more tasty. They are my favorite berry!

I didn't even think of drying the remnants for tea.  It would work!  If you've cooked out most of the goodness you might need to add a little more powder. 

Even nasty looking shriveled up hips can be useful though, if you can get enough.  When I was a poor, starving college student in Utah, I went up a canyon one saturday morning and saw some wild bushes loaded with hips.  I picked all the rose hips I could find.  They were dried out and when I tried to eat one they seemed ot be mostly seeds and little hairs.  I took them back to my apt., boiled them up until they had expanded and were kind of falling apart, mashed them up some and strained them, and made a gallon or so of absolutely heavenly rose hip syrup.  That syrup lasted me the rest of the semester although I was using it for something almost every day.  I added it to all kinds of recipes.  It changed my biscuits to a spicy, flavorfull cake and was wonderful over my pancakes.  It does incredible things to vanilla icecream.  It made a pretty good tea-like drink also.  The funny part is I never made it again once I moved back to Alaska.  I lke rosehips well enough that it seems I always end up carrying any I pick in my belly rather than a bucket.  Short sighted of me.  Maybe if I was somewhere where the hips were shriveled up and nasty looking I would have more self control.

The only thing you want to be careful about in harvesting rose hips is the bug spray, etc. that people often put on their domestic roses.  Other than that, I think any rose hip will do for syrup or jam, but I haven't really found a domestic rose that I thought was really worth eating out of hand. 
 
Michael Heath
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Make sure you know what you are planting if you decide to plant any hips.  I know that in Missouri, Multiflora roses(Rosa Multiflora)  has been classified as an invasive plant species.  And I have the thickets to prove it.
"Misery" Mike
 
Mike Peters
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As a landscaper, rose hips are definitely one of my favorite things to munch on! The rugosas really are quite nice, and I've personally found that the climbing style of roses with oblong hips are my favorite tasting. I plan on taking cuttings for my own garden one of these days .
 
Janet Reid
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Mick Fisch wrote:The best rosehips I have ever had are whatever grows wild in SouthCentral Alaska.  After the first frost they get soft and plump and the seeds soften up, making eating out of hand easier.  They aren't as big as the rosa rugosa, but they are much more tasty. They are my favorite berry! 

Do you have a photo of your Alaskan Rose?
I am in Australia and have used wild roses here and wonder if they are the same.
The domestic hips look too woody in comparison?
I have wondered about roses that are domestic but bred to be single or nearly single roses and whether they have the softer hips?
Like this one?
http://www.thompson-morgan.com/flowers/all-other-seeds-and-plants/shrubs-and-roses/rose-blue-eyes/t13928TM
I have roses in my back yard but they are a classic pink rose and the hips look woody so I am growing a feral rose in a bucket for the smaller hips.
Perhaps I am mistaken?
 
Janet Reid
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Janet Reid wrote:
Mick Fisch wrote:The best rosehips I have ever had are whatever grows wild in SouthCentral Alaska.  After the first frost they get soft and plump and the seeds soften up, making eating out of hand easier.  They aren't as big as the rosa rugosa, but they are much more tasty. They are my favorite berry! 

I have roses in my back yard but they are a classic pink rose and the hips look woody so I am growing a feral rose in a bucket for the smaller hips. Perhaps I am mistaken?


Gardening Australia recommends the rugosa's as well =)

2 – There are a number of single roses with ‘eyes’ – eg Eyes for You, For Your Eyes Only, Rose Peony etc – in Australia, but they aren’t the best for rose hips. 
The best for jam, jelly and conserves are single, species roses – especially the rugosa group (eg Agnes, Belle Poitevine, Blanc Double De Coubert, Freycinet, Roseraie De La Hay).

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s4248664.htm

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s1908016.htm

Modern cultivars like another single, Climbing Altissimo, can also produce juicy hips.  As long as you grow your own roses and can avoid toxic chemicals, any rose can be used to make rosehip edibles.
 
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