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Let's brainstorm some ideas we can do in small groups outside.


Our provincial Health Minister Andrian Dix and Health Officer Bonnie Henery have been giving the public daily updates and advice for getting through these troubling times.  As grim as things look, there are two messages of hope they keep repeating.

1. social distancing is not the same as social isolation
2. spend more time outside

And with those two gems, they go on to say that it's important to spend time with your family and friends, in small groups, outside.  Be in the sunlight.  Be active.  Do things together.  Don't be alone.  

Being outside is good for your health, your immune system, and even more important, it exposes you to UV rays which are the mortal enemy of viruses.  Spending time with people you love, is good for your mental health.  So long as we do so with an abundance of caution.


With that in mind, I want to make a list of some ways we can maintain distance while staying together.  What can we do outside with those we love.

- walking in the park
- starting a garden
- small group, non-contact sports like tennis or archery
- going to the beach
- picnic (with each person packing their own lunch - no communal or potluck food)
- teaching kids how to clean, repair, paint, and do other outdoor house maintenance
- prune the fruit trees and build a hugleculture
- earn a pep badge
- how about a keyhole garden?
- for you urbanites, get your name on that list for the allotment garden you always wanted to grow
- plant a tree
- start some seeds
- take cuttings
- grafting fruit trees
- learn/ teach survival skills
- learn a new-to-you old-time craft, like tatting, lacenet darning, blacksmithing, basket-weaving
- learn/ teach someone how to identify animal tracks

What else?

COMMENTS:
 
pollinator
Posts: 475
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solar wood heat
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Throw a permies party:
-home grown food;
-rocket mass heater demonstration;
-seed exchange;
-food forest brief explanations;
-water, 62 gallons per 10x10' roof, collection needs 500 to 2000 gallons not 55 gallons;
-things to lower your house energy bills.

 
Posts: 343
Location: St. George, UT. Zone 8a Dry/arid. 8" of rain in a good year.
92
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For exercise/enjoyment, I've always enjoyed these things.  They can be done alone or in small groups.

Hiking, while simultaneously bird watching/animal tracking/identifying plants, rock hounding, etc.

Kayaking on lakes.  

Mountain biking/cycling in general (weather permitting), cross country skiing/snowshoing.

Fishing/hunting.

I'd avoid too much cardio (heavy breathing) if I were in a group setting though.....and maybe wouldn't want to be the person down wind if that could be avoided.





 
pollinator
Posts: 351
Location: Ontario - Gardening in zone 3b, 4b, or 6b, depending on the day
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I went for a long hike today in a local conservation area - the trails were empty! Silly, because downtown was jammed on Friday night, and outdoor spaces aren't being quarantined.
 
master steward & author
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Location: Left Coast Canada
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here is a beautiful article on staying connected during times of social distancing.  https://spinoffmagazine.com/social-distancing-for-the-modern-spinner/?__s=ubizdmfmgjkdqsjcv3aa&utm_source=drip&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Social+Distancing+for+the+Modern+Spinner&utm_content=SO+03.17.20+Newsletter

here's part of it (the full article is lovely even if you aren't a spinner)

Use your digital connections to strengthen your bonds with friends, not obsessing over the latest coronavirus rumors.
I suspect we’ve all seen it: a forum or group chat that’s usually chatting about spinning or hiking or family news becomes a virtual room awash with anxiety-producing rumors. Avoid those rooms. Find (or start) a thread that commits to craft talk—there are plenty of places to get the latest virus news.

Remember your spinning friends who aren’t online friends.
Is there someone you usually sit next to in your spinning group who swore off social media years ago? A friend you only see in weaving class? It may take a little more effort than usual (especially for the phone-phobic among us!), but reach out to those friends who might be missing out on the online connection.

Look for ways to get together (but not too close together).
The recommendations I’ve read call for maintaining 6 feet of distance between people to avoid spreading the virus. Where I live, I can go out for a walk while maintaining that distance—and although Devin Helmen isn’t here to join me, I know he’d recommend going for a walk with a handspindle. As the weather warms up, take the opportunity to use your OUTSIDE VOICE and catch up with friends at arms’ length.

Reach out if the distance is getting to you.
If you’re used to getting social interaction in the course of your day, it may feel weird or unwelcoming to suddenly need to seek out the company of other humans. Do it anyway—maybe slowly at first. Browse through groups on Facebook, hashtags on Instagram, forums on Ravelry, or fiber-related podcasts, and see where you feel most at home. Decide how much you want to join in the conversation. You're not alone.

 
pollinator
Posts: 301
Location: Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
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I can't tell you how glad I am we went nuts earlier this year with bird houses and feeders! Having way too much fun with our ne hobby!

Watching the nest building, learning new species, enjoying their antics...we all need "joy" right now. Indulge in a new hobby, you won't regret it.

Our community has set up a group matching volunteers with those who can't go out. In some cases it is for grocery/med pick up, in others it's simply calling on phone or Skype to give them outside contact. Why don't all those who ARE able to adopt a local shut in and be their quarantine buddy.
 
pollinator
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Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
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I discovered how it's possible to have a meeting with a group while all are staying at home! It's an app called Zoom. I don't know exactly how it works, others organised it, but all you need is the internet, your own computer/laptop/smartphone with camera and microphone working. We were together with over 80 persons, able to see and hear one another. Modern technology can be great!
 
gardener
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Location: Fraser River Headwaters, Zone3, Lat: 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
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I went snowshoeing with 3 friends yesterday.  We kept our physical distance and enjoyed hours of traipsing through the forest.
 
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In northern Michigan many of us are busy making maple syrup  , a very encouraging outside early spring acti ity. You can do it without being right on top of each other especially if you are boiling down sap in an open air more primitive set up.
 
steward
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Location: Missoula, MT
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Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:I discovered how it's possible to have a meeting with a group while all are staying at home! It's an app called Zoom. I don't know exactly how it works, others organised it, but all you need is the internet, your own computer/laptop/smartphone with camera and microphone working. We were together with over 80 persons, able to see and hear one another. Modern technology can be great!


Yes, what Inge said!

I did it today with my family and it was great! It's not doing things outside, though you *could* take your device outside for the meeting if your outside is near your wifi and quiet enough. I made a thread to discuss it and tips or tricks:  video hangouts in a time of social distancing or quarantine.


 
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