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master stewards:
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stewards:
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garden masters:
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For a while I (Paul) had about 30.  But after some thought, I combined a few and ended up with 26.  Shawn helped me polish the list.     And then I found that i very much wanted a lot more of one than another, so the one I wanted a lot from i divided.   And while yakking on and about it yesterday, jocelyn (and maybe jeremy) helped me think of two more.  A bit more fiddling and I am now at 22.

I cannot help but think that there are 2 more that I have not thought of yet.  Somehow, it seems like 24 is gonna be THE number.  I feel that sharing where I am now, there could be some brainstorming (shitty ideas leading to good ideas) that will finish up this list.   (maybe gardening needs to be divided?)



dimensional lumber woodworking
  dimensional lumber
  heavier on power tools
round wood woodworking
  Green woodworking
  proenekke (all hand tools)
natural building
  cob / plaster
  straw bale
  wofati
Food Prep and Preservation
  Fermentation
Wildcrafting and guerrilla gardening  (xxx needs better title)
  fishing and hunting
gardening
textiles
  mend clothes, make clothes
  curtains, upholstered furniture
  leatherwork
  basket stuff
rocket
  rocket mass heater
  rocket oven
  rocket cook top
tool care
  small tool care (sharpening/handles/etc.)
  large tool care (truck/tractor/etc.)
  appliances
  bicycles
Metalworking
  welding
  cutting
  blacksmithing
  casting
  bending/shaping
  grinding
animal care
  chickens
  pigs
  cattle
  rabbits
  sheep
  goats
  dairy
  beekeeping
  fish
  butchering
electricity (including solar)
  simple solar (no battery, strict DC)
  basic solar (battery, strict DC)
  full solar (battery, AC/DC)
woodland care
  junkpole fence
  Firewood
  coppicing
  living fence
  twig construction (arbors, tomato cages, trellises, wattle fence)
community living
  public art
  cooking 4 meals for a group
  (xxx needs more stuff here)
commerce (be able to do business)
  set up a residual income stream
  bring income from the greater community
  bring income from the global community
earthworks
  roads, trails, and lawns
  experience with large equipment
  dry stack
greywater and willow feeders
plumbing and hot water
nest
  cleaning
  shoveling snow
natural medicine
homesteading
  known experiences that don't fit into the other aspects
oddball
  unknown things that come up



Staff note (Nicole Alderman):

For reference, here Paul described about how long each badge should take:

paul wheaton wrote:A formal PEP1 program would last 2 weeks (~80 hours). Completing the PEP1 program requires 16 sand badges.

A formal PEP2 program would fill a summer (~510 hours). Requires 1 wood badge + 7 straw badges + 14 sand badges.

A formal PEP3 program would take about nine months (~1550 hours). Requires 7 wood badges + 15 straw badges.

A formal PEP4 program would take a little over two years (~4700 hours). Requires 3 iron badges + 12 wood badges + 7 straw badges.


In general, I think the approximate time to complete a badge would be about:

sand badge: ~5 hours
straw badge: ~40 hours (+35 hours over sand, about 4 or 5 days)
wood badge: ~220 hours (+180 hours over straw, about 4 to 5 weeks)
iron badge: 1250 hours (+1030 hours over wood, about six months)

COMMENTS:
 
gardener
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I'm curious as to what else might be included in "nest." Right now it feels very weak to me. But I guess I just like to think that everyone knows that stuff. Especially snow shovelling for us northerners.
 
master pollinator
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Perhaps textiles instead of fabrics?

Wildcrafting works, but I agree that another term for guerilla gardening might have to be found.

-CK
 
master steward
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Shawn Klassen-Koop wrote:I'm curious as to what else might be included in "nest." Right now it feels very weak to me. But I guess I just like to think that everyone knows that stuff. Especially snow shovelling for us northerners.



I think there would be a list of unconventional cleaning experiences.  

  - Clearing a clogged sink with zip tool (instead of the chemical solutions)

  - cleaning an oven with something other than the chemical solutions

  - washing dishes

         o getting the job done without sponges or other tools that harbor funk
         o care for kitchen wood
         o care for cast iron
         o using the dishwasher as a drying rack
         o favoring hot water over soap

  - washing a floor with water

  - using the following things when water alone won't get the job done, and then, using them very sparingly

         o vinegar
         o baking soda
         o citrus based solvents
         o hydrogen peroxide

  - drying clothes

         o on a clothes line
         o on a drying rack

  - washing clothes manually


I suspect that once we start down this road, there will end up being a lot of things here.  However, I do not yet know what might be in this space for wood or iron badges




 
Shawn Klassen-Koop
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Fungi? As its own category? Or maybe fits under woodland management?
 
paul wheaton
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Shawn Klassen-Koop wrote:Fungi? As its own category? Or maybe fits under woodland management?



probably wildcrafting.
 
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Uh... What is PEP?

Anyway, thoughts on the hierarchy:

- s/b more stuff under food prep
- " gardening
- "bicycles"; under a "Transport" title (includes need and options for on-site transport, public transport, repair facilities, feet(shoes), rickshaws, wheelbarrows, wheelchairs, ADA(permie version)
- "Metalworking"; everything under either "welding" or "smithing"; add "sheetmetal"
- "Electricity"
     Generating
        Solar
        Wind
        Hydrolic
        Liquid fuel generators
     Energy Storage (mostly batteries, possibly reservoirs)
     Wiring
 Earthworks
     Types (terrace, swales, hugel, roads, trails, ponds, dams, retaining walls, etc)
     Equipment (hand and heavy both)
     (lose the "lawns")
Plumbing; includes greywater; "willows" = part of greywater; drainage
Nest
    Cleaning
    Seasonal (includes snow)
    Vermin (bugs, too)
    Health impacts of various options; ADA
   
FWIW
Rufus
 
pollinator
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"Wildcrafting and Guerilla Gardening", could become "Wildcrafting and Wildcultivating"...

The "Wildcultivating" meaning anything from seed-bombing, to median plantings, to encouraging "crops" that you are wildcrafting to be more prolific... influencing the landscape/nature for some benefit.

Where "wildcrafting" is more the hunter-gatherer... taking advantage of what exists in nature.
 
Kenneth Elwell
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under Metalworking, blacksmithing and forging seem to be duplicates, no? or maybe... so important as to rate two entries! ;-)

I agree with Rufus, there's a bunch of stuff like "cutting", "bending and shaping", "grinding", that fit under the umbrellas of "welding" or "blacksmithing", and that "sheetmetal" is a good addition/distinction.

I also think that adding "machining" or "machine shop" would be a good idea as the umbrella covering: drilling, tapping/threading, sawing, filing, lathe and milling work, measuring/tolerances, properties of metals/metallurgy stuff.


Dry stack is more earthworks than gardening...

That leaves gardening, empty.
Is gardening...?
food production, as in vegetables and grains?
herbs for food and medicine?
flowers?
tree crops?
composting?
no till?
STUN?
swales, berms, hugels? (maybe also more earthworks-y)
 
paul wheaton
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Kenneth Elwell wrote:blacksmithing and forging seem to be duplicates, no?



blacksmithing:  heating a chunk of metal and mashing it into a shape

forging: pouring liquid metal into a form

 
gardener
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paul wheaton wrote:forging: pouring liquid metal into a form


I think "casting" be a better word for the latter.  I'm a hobbyist blacksmith and I'd consider "blacksmithing" to be making fire, heating metal and shaping it.  I'd consider "forging" to be the subset of hammering or otherwise influencing hot metal to change shape.
 
paul wheaton
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Mike Jay wrote:I think "casting" be a better word for the latter.



Change made!
 
Kenneth Elwell
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Or "foundry", which is more specific to "casting" metals, than the generic "casting" applying many materials that have a liquid-->solid phase change (plaster, wax, rubber, ceramic, concrete...)

Also, it's alliterative... "Forge and Foundry"
 
paul wheaton
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i moved "dry stack" to earthworks
 
paul wheaton
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Starting to flesh these out a bit.

gardening
https://permies.com/t/96686/PEP-Badge-Gardening

woodland care
https://permies.com/t/96947/PEP-Badge-Woodland-Care

 
paul wheaton
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Each badge will have several bits that need to be verified to qualify for the badge.  I have decided to call these "badge bits" or "BBs".

In the case of the sand badge for woodland care: https://permies.com/t/96947/PEP-Badge-Woodland-Care - there would be 8 BBs.  In a way, it acts as a bit of a checklist.  
 
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Somewhere I missed the initial introductory email/post about what the purpose of PEP is and what the acronym means.  Nonetheless, some overall thoughts on the concept.  

As a New or Beginning Farmer and Rancher under USDA's programming definition, I've been in discussions with the local technical college about establishing a training program under the BFRDP grants.  My suggestion was that since farmers need a basic skill level in a wide variety of trades, but don't need full journeyman status in any of them, they could offer a "Tradeskills for Farming & Ranching" course.  I don't need to be able to frame an entire house to UCC standards, but I do need to know which end of the hammer strikes the nail and how to make sure my corners are (relatively) square.  A complete engine rebuild on a million dollar tractor is something best left to the professionals, but if I own one, I should be able to change my own oil or pack the wheel bearings.  So a very basic, sub-apprentice, just enough to be dangerous and save my farm some money by not hiring out everything that doesn't involve plants and animals that needs done.  

The PEP program seems to be quite similar to my concept, with the added benefit of quite a few actual agriculturally oriented blocks of instruction.  I would suggest a few restructuring possibilities.  

1) Ditch the Badge designation or something that sounds more professional and less Scouting-oriented, unless the target audience actually ARE scouts.  I believe the process might be better served by using the Tradecraft designators of Apprentice-Journey-Master-Artisan.  It would be necessary, and likely desirable, to realign the various non-agricultural skill sets into an umbrella grouping that avoids terms like Carpentry or Metalworking to avoid angering the Educational Deities and their Union Overlords that dictate the programming for those skill sets.  

2)  Divide all non-growing skills into four increments:  Design/Build/Make/Maintain... Generally, at least 3 of the 4 will apply to any one medium.  Design a Wooden Mallet gives you all of the prep work, like figuring out dimensions for what you need, and determining the most appropriate local wood.  Make a Mallet would involve the actual crafting, while Maintain a Mallet would focus on preventantive maintennance and repairs.  

3) I would also consider clicking the microscope back at least one or two magnitudes on the "Harvest X Calories" set of skills... to  be more individualized.  A dozen crops grown using permy techniques for a total of 100K calories is great, but I would qualify the crops by classifications rather than specifics... such as "no more than 3 cucurbits, no more than two different species of bramble, and at least one variety of stone fruit."  I mention this in particular because it strikes me that part of the learning process is discovering that trying to winter over parsnips and carrots in a Hugel might be an excellent way to create a hugel-projects in which all of the inner-city voles and mice living in abject poverty live.  Check boxes are nice, but experience is the point, and bad choices make good experience.  

That's about it for now, as I probably should leave for work in the next 5 and haven't changed yet.  
 
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Trying to think of anything you might have missed....maybe teaching? Passing on knowledge is essential to permaculture, yes?

Brainstorming some ideas along that line:

Teaching
Teaching adults
- Guide one adult through one thing toward earing a badge (those are called BBs, right?)
- Teach a group of people how to do a BB
- Apprentice one person through a Badge
- Teach a group through a badge
- Create your own badge curriculum based upon your own area and philosophies
Teaching kids
- Guide a child through a BB
- Teach a group of kids how to do a BB
- Apprentice one kid through a Badge
- Teach a kids through a badge
- Take care of a infant for a few hours
- Take care of a toddler for a few hours
- Take care of a preschooler for a few hours
- Take care of an elementary school kid for a few hours
- Take a group of kids on a nature walk
- Guild children through a nature craft or natural skill

---------

If I were to separate gardening into two separate badges, I'd do

Forest Gardening (perennials, self-seeding, etc)
Intensive Gardening (zone 1 herb spirals, garden beds, etc)

or

Annuals
Perennials

===================================

Another potential badge could be for community. What are skills we need to operate in a community? Trading, bartering, compromising, organizing work parties, sharing a house, dividing labor, finding someone to do work for you, etc. For many these things do NOT come naturally.

EDIT: just re-read the list more closely and noticed that you do, indeed, have a community section. I'll leave my comment up there in case anything I said was actually helpful.
 
pollinator
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Community

I suggest, instead of specific tasks or in addition to them:

- Living with at least four people for a week (weekend?), with people who you have not previously lived with
A one-week/ weekend course would qualify?

- Writing a diary about your experience
- Sharing your diary (when it's ready) with the people you lived with.
- Asking for comments on how you performed as a member of community.
- Writing a conclusion based on the comments and your own writings: what went well, what you would like to improve on  
 
Nicole Alderman
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paul wheaton
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A general part of every wood badge is to help people getting their sand badge.   And a general part of every iron badge is to help people getting their straw badge.   So that's the teaching angle that I have worked in so far.

Perhaps parenting would be part of PEN, but I have given it some thought and I am choosing to not make parenting part of PEP.  

I do think it could be good to have some teaching things done as part of the community badge.
 
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I don't see:
canning/dehydrating/smoking
 
Nicole Alderman
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It looks like there's a Food Prep and Preservation badge

There's currently only fermentation listed under it, but I think smoking, canning, and dehydrating would all fit in there.

So, there'd probably be a Sand-level Badge something like

* Make a half gallon-worth of lacto fermented pickles
* Dehydrate 3 pounds of food
* Can 2 quarts worth of jam
* Cook a stirfry from scratch
* Make a pot of soup from scratch

and the Straw Badge might have some things like:

* Smoke 2 pounds of food
* Make a gallon of kombucha
* Make 1/2 gallon of yogurt
* Bake a quick bread from scratch

and Wood Badge might have

* Make a bread that requires yeast, from scratch
* Make beer, ginger ale or cider
etc


 
paul wheaton
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maybe we need to get a food brainstorming thread going.

for sand badge, i kinda think we need to get a little more specific about what is being cooked.   I also like the idea that at least one thing includes harvesting food as part of the prep.  

I very much like the idea of successfully sealing some sort of canning.   And a successful food dehydration thing.

 
Chris Palmberg
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Maybe its just me, but it seems to me that, at least with the Food Prez series, we're focusing a bit too much on a breadth of knowledge at the risk of failing the participant.  Rather than having them cover fermentation, smoking, dehydrating, curing (MUST have bacon) smoking, etc ad infinitum in their sand badge, and simply increasing the volume produced, maybe we need to focus on at least marginally improving one skill at a time.  

For example:  

Level 1:  Select from one of the following preservation techniques.
-Fruit Preserves:  Make 96 jars of jelly utilizing no fewer than 4 types of fruit.  At least 24 jars can contain no added pectin.  
-Freezing:  Utilizing accepted techniques, prepare and freeze 20# of garden produce, including at least 4 types (tomatoes, corn, beans, etc.)
-Pickling:  Put up 12 gallons of vegetables utilizing at least two different pickling recipes, such as dill, bread & butter, or sweet pickles, dilly beans, etc.
-Drying:  Prepare at least four varieties (5# each) of dried food, including at least one variety each of fruit, herbs, and meat.  

Level 2:  Select any two from Level 1 plus
-Sauces:  Utilizing standard, cultural, or vintage culinary techniques, prepare and can 2 gallons of sauce, salsa, or similar condiment.  The preserved food must have a minimum of four distinct ingredients.  
-Smoking:  Cure 25# of meat from a minimum of two animal species, no less than 5# per cut.  
-Curing:  Utilizing natural preservative mixtures, prepare 20# of meat such as bacon, summer sausage, proscuitto, etc.  No fewer than two species of animal should be used.  
-Dairy:  Churn 20# of butter, including at least 2# from non-bovine milk (goat, yak, llama, water buffalo, cat, be creative.) Make 2# each of a cream cheese, soft cheese, and cured cheese variety of your choice utilizing ingredients of your choice.


Now, I'm not an avid food preservationist, but these PEPs are designed for people who want to learn.  Starting with simple tasks and working towards more complex techniques while still improving basic skills just makes sense to me.  
As the participant moves forward, the volume created increases based upon longevity, i.e. if Level 2 includes 2 from Level 1, and Level 3 includes 3 Level 1 and a pair of Level 2 skills, by the time they've achieved mastery, they've put up a huge volume of pickles, jellies, charcuterie, etc., simply by virtue of repetition.  Plus, I'll be honest.  Making rhubarb jelly or raspberry jam gets boring after a while, so if I'm going to stick to jams & jellies through four levels, I'm going to start looking at other things I can make within the same skill set.  And things like pumpkin butter or chokecherry jelly have MASSIVELY different processes than the others.  Just in the last year of dabbling around with my surplus produce, I've discovered, for example, that Armenian cucumbers don't lose their crisp when pickled, and that chokecherry jelly doesn't come out clear, and if you get the proportion of ripe to underipe fruit right, you end up with a jelly that comes out of the water bath set like concrete.  
 
pollinator
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Yes, I think a brainstorming thread on Food (preparing and preservation) will be very useful.
What Chris here above calls 'level 1' to me looks like level 3 at least.
I thought of starting with the easiest things for level 1, like making about a kilogram (4 jars) of jam (half fruit, half sugar) and the same amount of sweet&sour pickles (gherkins). And freezing green beans and ready-made soups. These are skills I aleady have, but for someone who isn't used to 'cook from scratch' I consider them a good starting level.
 
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Sorry, I'm new.

Can anyone tell me what PEP means? I read through this thread noting that others had asked this same question but did not see an answer.
 
Nicole Alderman
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PEP = Permaculture Experience according to Paul

It's kind of his way of certifying people for doing things and gaining skills that he thinks are important, especially for land like his. So, someone who comes to Wheaton Labs can work and learn skills there and get a spiffy certification in the process. We're also trying to make it so that people could also get badges and certification online here on permies.
 
Chris Palmberg
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Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:Yes, I think a brainstorming thread on Food (preparing and preservation) will be very useful.
What Chris here above calls 'level 1' to me looks like level 3 at least.
I thought of starting with the easiest things for level 1, like making about a kilogram (4 jars) of jam (half fruit, half sugar) and the same amount of sweet&sour pickles (gherkins). And freezing green beans and ready-made soups. These are skills I aleady have, but for someone who isn't used to 'cook from scratch' I consider them a good starting level.



Honestly, Inge, my last batch of Rhubarb Jelly made 10 jars.  8 flats of jelly, if the supplies are stockpiled and sufficient fruit is ripened, can be made in a day's time, although if you're dabbling like I tend to, it might take a while to find sufficient fruit.  In the past year (2018) I just kept trying things in an effort to find out "what works" both in terms of store versus natural pectin, as well as various fruits.  I do value-added goods at my local Farmers Market, and my goal is always to present product that isn't available in Aisle 12 of the local grocery store.  As a result, I found great success in Pie Cherry, Rhubarb, Mulberry, Chokecherry, and Sand Plum (wild variety indigenous to the Great Plains) jellies, but each has its own set of nuances.  

The purpose of these badges is not to replicate, but to educate, through trial and error.  Doing a single batch of jelly doesn't really teach you anything except how to follow a recipe.  Give me a new fruit, particularly one that is not raised commercially, and I'm likely to try to make jelly or jam from it purely on principle.  Requiring multiple batches to be made using a diverse collection of ingredients encourages that creativity, particularly if you've got this stubborn streak that says I'm not going to source frozen fruit from the local Piggly Wiggly/Safeway/Kroger.  By teaching culinary creativity, we teach a sustainable, replicable, TEACHABLE set of skills, which far exceed the parameters of a recipe card.  
 
paul wheaton
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for food badge brainstorming, how about continuing in this thread:  https://permies.com/t/42480/Pep-Food-Processing-Preservation
 
Nicole Alderman
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I copied the posts over to https://permies.com/t/42480/Pep-Food-Processing-Preservation.

I am wondering with some of these types of badge, like animal care and food prep, if there should be a way to specialize. Like, someone could specialize in ducks in animals--they'd have a basic understanding of the other animals, perhaps in the sand badge, but specialize in further levels?

And, with food preservation, they learn the basics of fermenting, pickling, cooking, dehydrating, canning--and then they specialize in higher levels?
 
Nicole Alderman
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Looking at this list, I see a LOT of building badges--round wood woodworking, dimensional woodworking and natural building.

But, growing things only has one badge. I'm really wondering if it should be split into zone 1/2 type gardening (more intensive stuff, herb spirals, key hole gardens, Ruth Stout, gardening) and less-intensive forms (guilds, food forests, hugelkulture, etc).

Also, the animals badge covers a LOT of animals! Perhaps it could be split into small livestock (fish, bunnies, chickens, ducks, bees etc) and larger livestock (sheep, cows, goats, llamas, pigs). Those big livestock seem to require a lot more, and rather different, care than the smaller livestock.

One other type of badge came to mind today: reducing-waste/Scavenging. This might just go in the Currency Badge, though...
 
paul wheaton
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growing things has at least three badges:  gardening, woodland care and foraging.  

And then growing things pops up again in earthworks and maybe a few others.
 
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One suggestion for categories:
Site Design (or simply design in general).  Each of the pep "areas" are great in and amongst themselves, but only solid thoughtful design can bring about synergistic interactions among all of them. Perhaps, this is a category that would be unlocked only after having completed a set number of other badges.  Bits could be measuring/surveying (ie, measuring the space to be designed, and then laying out features of the design), energy flow diagrams, interaction paths, nutrient capture and paths, water capture plans, zone layout, etc.)  

I understand design is an integral part of everything that is already mentioned even down to the club mallet, but I think that it is of great importance to emphasize the purposeful alignment of all the elements for their maximum potential with the fewest input.  

Perhaps also part of the same category or an entirely different category would be Water.  Water Capture, Acuaculture, Acuaponics . . . maybe, pond building, dam building, swale construction, etc.

Just a few ideas.  
 
paul wheaton
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Site Design



That is what a PDC is for.


Water.  Water Capture, Acuaculture, Acuaponics . . . maybe, pond building, dam building, swale construction, etc.  



PEP won't contain aquaponics.  Maybe PEC will?  (Permaculture Experience according to Cameron?)

A lot of water stuff will be in plumbing.  Pond stuff will be in earthworks.  Aquaculture will be in animal care.

 
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Secure a cast iron cooking device (rummage sale, flea market, goodwill, out behind the barn). Bring it back to full use.
 
Cameron Carter
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paul wheaton wrote:

Site Design



That is what a PDC is for.


Water.  Water Capture, Acuaculture, Acuaponics . . . maybe, pond building, dam building, swale construction, etc.  



PEP won't contain aquaponics.  Maybe PEC will?  (Permaculture Experience according to Cameron?)

A lot of water stuff will be in plumbing.  Pond stuff will be in earthworks.  Aquaculture will be in animal care.



Sounds good. I hadn't seen that plumbing part.  Would that also include rainwater catchment?
 
paul wheaton
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Cameron Carter wrote:Would that also include rainwater catchment?



I have not decided yet.  Maybe.
 
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