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general

All natural materials, for examples linen/flax, hemp, nettle, wool, cotton, silk, grass, feathers, willow. Local/home-grown/harvested materials preferred over store-bought ones.

sand badge

darn a sock
sew a patch onto one of the following:
   - an elbow of a shirt
   - the knee of pants
   - a quilt or tote bag
make a small pillow
make twine
knit a hot pad or crochet dishcloth
woven basket


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   Not sure if this should go under textiles or wood working  for a PEP skill, but making a simple loom and weaving on it is a very helpful skill.  There are many different types of looms. Some are simple to make. Others would be more so. I keep meaning to make a Rigid Heddle Loom, I have made a pattern, just haven't actually made it yet. You can make a great deal of things on a Rigid Heddle Loom, I have wanted one for a long time but the cost it just to high for me right now. And when I know I could make it I can't justify buying one.  
 For a simple square loom,(pin loom) all you need are some nails and four pieces of wood.  You can make washcloths, pot holders, placemats, and even cloths when you sew them together.   Here is a Youtube that shows how to make one and how to weave on it.    
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjKM_YtUH5k
Ruby Stedman shows how to make one and weave on it.

Also an Inkle loom  is not difficult to make and you can make simple or decorative belts or straps for multiple things.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMUxG4W4_tM
Dave Canterbury shows how to make one in this vid

he is weaving on this one
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCPTWSZzpjk

this is a better one to show the steps of warping and weaving and how to advance the warp.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwHE-PSU9Yc

another on how to warp the loom
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yy6saHjqC4

There are different designs when it comes to Inkle looms but they work basically the same way.  You can make the warp wider or more narrow if you want.  You can also make the strap/belt etc.  a loose weave by not "beating" the weft down as tightly or make it very firm if you compact the weft down.  The fiber you use also makes a difference.


 
r ranson
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We're thinking about adding this to one of the later badges https://permies.com/t/50910/permaculture-fiber-arts-tools/fiber-arts/loom

It's probably going to be a backstrap loom "weave your own loom" as this is the most affordable to make and has the most versatility to learn different techniques if the student doesn't have a big loom for the final level projects.
 
Lyda Eagle
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 I was thinking of a Back Strap too, but was afraid a newbie would look at it and "No way".  So I was trying to think of some simple methods anyone could do that wouldn't take long or cost too much to make. And get them use to weaving and seeing how versatile it can be.  And they could have a few items as a result.
 I also thought about stick/peg weaving.  All you need are some "sticks" or dowel rods and yarn/fiber.  You can make a base to put the pegs in by drilling holes the size of the dowels into a piece of wood.   You can make them as wide or narrow as you like.  I have made scarves, mats, rugs. even a jacket by sewing pieces together.  It can be made as a square/rectangle or made into a circle.  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNRWYROgkMM

 Or tube weaving to make a cord. (Sometimes called tube knitting) So this may need to go in a different pace.  That can be done with a cardboard tube and some craft sticks.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuvgnrVGaOc&t=483s

Maybe people could do a few smaller projects and work up to doing a larger one, so it doesn't seem to complicated at first.  
 
Lyda Eagle
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Not sure how many would want this, but  I also thought of working with leather.  Making a belt, bag, tool holders, Moccasins, sandals etc.
I am by no means an expert but after a back injury that left me with nerve damage in my leg and foot I could not wear regular shoes any more. So I learned to make Moccasins.
They can be very simple to very elaborate.
Or even working with rawhide, tanning it to make a workable leather.
I know this would not be something everyone would want to do.  But shoes and belts and the rest can also be made from other textiles. Like heavy canvas. (Or even  the faux leather made from mushrooms. I haven't used this yet but really would like too)
Or just learning to fix shoes/boots can save money instead of always buying new ones.
 
 
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We've been thinking about making moccasins as one of the things for the straw badge.

One neat thing might be for someone to have garbed themselves from head to toe with things they made like a leather moccasins, sewn pajama pants, simple woven shirt, and a knit hat. Something like that.

I think Raven's gotten the Straw Badge about 90% done, but textiles is such a HUGE field, and there's just SO MUCH that it's hard to know what to prioritize for each badge!
 
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The list mentions upholstered furniture. We were just cleaning out my mother's room at the nursing home (she was done - her passing is a relief for her) and the Personal Care Workers were shocked when I said that the small bookshelf we'd put there for her use was made by my grandfather for my room as a child. Yes, it's at least 50 years old, and still does its job! So... that makes me think that some sort of PEP badge for refinishing/repainting a piece of furniture and reupholstering a simple piece such as a chair or bench, might be really good. I told the Workers that if I had to buy furniture, I would look for quality second hand that's made from real wood and not buy the compressed sawdust crap that doesn't last. This sort of fits in with the whole re-use, ungarbage thing also.
 
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