• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Mike Haasl
  • James Freyr
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Kate Downham
  • Jay Angler
  • thomas rubino
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the sand badge in round wood working.

This project will be carving a big, ugly, nearly useless spoon using only hand tools. This should be a very basic and simple spoon, able to be built pretty quickly.

You should consider the type of wood to use for making the spoon, avoiding ones with potential toxicity or strong tastes. Here's a thread discussing it further. best wood for a wooden spoon

Be safe when using hand tools, work at your own risk, and enjoy building!

To get certified for this BB, post three pics.  

  - Your chunk of wood that you are starting with  
  - Progress about half way through, with the hand tools you have decided to use for this
  - Final product

Here's a picture, and this one is finished more than necessary, it can be a lot simpler than this.



This video shows the general process and what the finished product should look like.



In this video Paul talks with Michael "Skeeter" Pilarski, permaculture and wildcrafting instructor, about the best wood to use for the spoon.

COMMENTS:
 
steward
Posts: 29860
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like this style much better - although i think that might be some pretty dry wood.   I think you would want to start with some really green wood.

 
paul wheaton
steward
Posts: 29860
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here is my all time favorite wood spoon.

This spoon is made of serviceberry and has never been treated.   The coloring is some sort of staining of wood.  This spoon has seen extremely heavy use for ten years.  

I like how the spoon is not symmetrical - proving that it is not made in some factory.



carved-wood-spoon.jpg
[Thumbnail for carved-wood-spoon.jpg]
carved wood spoon made from service berry, never treated
 
garden master
Posts: 1275
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
490
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love the look and color of that serviceberry spoon, so cool it has lasted that long and never been treated too!
 
master steward
Posts: 11428
Location: Pacific Northwest
4854
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Does this count as a "big, ugly, nearly useless spoon using only hand tools"?  Made it today and had to stop early because, well, I cut myself and was bleeding thtough the bandage onto the spoon, and so figured I should stop....

(I just ahve to say, I've wanted to carve a spoon since I was a kid, and got the mora spoon carving tool about 4 years ago for my birthday. Of course I've had babies and toddlers that whole time, and so never got around to finally carving a spoon. This Badge Bit worked as excellent motivation for me!)

This was carved from a dwarf apple tree that died almost 2 winters ago from the weight of snow. It's been sitting outside, soggy wet. I brought it inside and carved this spoon from it
IMGP9742.JPG
wood selected for spoon
wood selected for spoon
IMGP9743.JPG
wood cut to size for making spoon
wood cut to size for making spoon
IMGP9744.JPG
shaping wooden spoon
shaping wooden spoon
IMGP9747.JPG
shaping wooden spoon
shaping wooden spoon
IMGP9749.JPG
shaping wooden spoon
shaping wooden spoon
IMGP9750.JPG
shaping wooden spoon
shaping wooden spoon
IMGP9753.JPG
shaping wooden spoon
shaping wooden spoon
IMGP9755.JPG
shaping wooden spoon
shaping wooden spoon
IMGP9756.JPG
shaping wooden spoon
shaping wooden spoon
 
paul wheaton
steward
Posts: 29860
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nicole,

I think you will discover that the carving will go about 7 times easier if you use green wood.  

To qualify for this BB, your spoon needs to be a bit better than that.  
 
Nicole Alderman
master steward
Posts: 11428
Location: Pacific Northwest
4854
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yeah, I discovered that fun fact about seasoned/green wood when I tried to carve swords and staves out of 2-year seasoned holly. Thee detail I could get was fantastic...but they were REALLY hard to carve. On the plus side, they didn't bend out of shape like the green wood ones do



Anyway, I'd been wanting to use up the apple wood from my apple tree, and the only green wood that is thick enough and I can easily access by my self is alder (which I'm pretty sure wouldn't make a good spoon, as it's so fluffy!).

Hmmmm, maybe that maple tree we copiced has thick enough branches now...
 
Nicole Alderman
master steward
Posts: 11428
Location: Pacific Northwest
4854
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Likes 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I got further along today!
IMGP9758.JPG
hand made wooden spoon
hand made wooden spoon
pep-roundwood-woodworking-first-spoon-carved.jpg
hand made wooden spoon
hand made wooden spoon
IMGP9765.JPG
hand made wooden spoon
hand made wooden spoon
IMGP9772.JPG
hand made wooden spoon
hand made wooden spoon
IMGP9761.JPG
hand made wooden spoon
hand made wooden spoon
Staff note (paul wheaton):

I certify that this BB is complete

 
master steward & author
Posts: 18010
Location: Left Coast Canada
4534
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have serious spoon evenvy.

Because I have a million urgent things that need doing before new years (a week ago), I decided to spend the afternoon making a spoon and discovered that I'm really crappy at making a spoon.  But I learned a lot and I want to take what I learned and try again.  Maybe even get one of those curved knives.

I also discovered why a hand-carved spoon (even a machine-hand carved spoon) goes for 35-50 dollars in the local markets.  

You did say it could be an "ugly, nearly useless spoon".  I tried to make big, but my tools for cutting wood weren't good enough for that.

My tools: pocket knife, billhook, loopers.

My wood: willow



I cut it to length and split it with the billhook.  I then used the billhook to take off the bark.  



a pocket knife and kindling block





Things I learned:
1. willow is stringy.
2. green willow is nearly impossible to sand
3. making a spoon is kind of fun.  
4. I really like my handle shape.
5. I should have noticed the pithy bit in the middle of the wood was softer than the rest and chosen a different piece of wood.

I need to find some way to dry this so it doesn't split too much and then sand it.  But until then, I think it looks pretty neat.





 
paul wheaton
steward
Posts: 29860
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Raven,

Keep shaving it down a bit.  You're almost there!

Don't try to sand green wood.   Once you have it pretty well shaped with knives, then you let it dry and you can sand it then.

 
I am going down to the lab. Do NOT let anyone in. Not even this tiny ad:
2020 SKIP: Skills to Inherit Property (PEP1) event --July 12-25th, Wheaton Labs
https://permies.com/wiki/skip-2020
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!