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College Options

 
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What if you could go to any accredited online college for free, and get paid to do it? What college program would you choose?
 
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I would choose history.  
 
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Agreed on history - but also another language. I'd love to formalize and dramatically increase my knowledge of Mandarin, Spanish, French, and German. I feel extremely limited in all of them - like I know just enough tp get myself into a whole heap of trouble, lol.
 
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History here, too, but also architecture, permaculture, and Biblical Theology.  Hmm.  And archaeology.  Geology.  Engineering (civil).  I would take Spanish, Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, but not for a degree.  
 
Carla Burke
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Kathleen Sanderson wrote: History here, too, but also architecture, permaculture, and Biblical Theology.  Hmm.  And archaeology.  Geology.  Engineering (civil).  I would take Spanish, Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, but not for a degree.  



Thanks for the reminder! Maybe while we're all hunkered down, I'll dig out the Greek & Latin roots curriculum, I taught my kids with, and brush up on that!
 
pollinator
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This answer will come with the assumption that the prospective student is ~18-20 years of age......young enough to take advantage of the benefits of the degree:

A curriculum in stock investments:  https://learn.org/articles/Which_College_Courses_Will_Help_Prepare_Students_for_Becoming_a_Stock_Broker.html

Although happy with what I chose 40 years ago, knowing several early-retired traders now has been eye opening.  Many of them were accumulating monetary wealth early enough with that first degree that they could have then, in their mid- to late-twenties, immersed themselves in a second degree that they felt was of greater interest to them.  And many of them did just that.  Even if your goal is an MD or PhD, you still will achieve that schooling by your mid-30s and have the investment knowledge already under your hat.

 
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in addition
I learned early on from a book my great uncle Ben wrote decades ago, at the time he was one of the top world leaders in education. The chapter out of one of his books that still sticks with me was titled, "Education a rich field from which to choose" and went on to explain that as far as subject or educational program to pursue everyone is different, some people just naturally good at mechanical skills and others can solve calculus problems with ease. Find something you enjoy and have a knack for and your educational experience will be a joy and not a daunting task. And going to work in the field which is fitting for you can bring much joy to your life.
 
Kim Taylor
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Hmm, judging by the comments, I should have been more clear. I'm interested in agriculture, but not run-of-the-mill conventional monoculture farming. So, I'm looking for a program (not a major) at a college that would offer this education online. Anyone know if any good programs out there?
 
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Kim Taylor wrote:What if you could go to any accredited online college for free, and get paid to do it?




Paid to study online? Where do I sign up?
 
Kim Taylor
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Ellendra Nauriel wrote:Paid to study online? Where do I sign up?



The US military. 😂 Just sign away your rights for a few years. Just to be clear, they don't pay me to do it, but give me money for housing, so... it's basically money for something I'd be paying for anyway.
 
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For most jobs its about your network, certification and experience, very rarely is it about your A+ grade of D grades. So in alot of ways the college or even the subject that you got the degree in doesn't matter. Granted the college you go to does help determine your network of roommates and contacts.

https://catalog.tamu.edu/undergraduate/agriculture-life-sciences/horticultural-sciences/horticulture-ba/#programrequirementstext
I don't see much, just get any easy online degree, then get a master gardener certificate, then a PDC, followed by a urban farmer certificate for the business bit. Then do an internship urban farmer classes normally set you up with one. You can get college credits for a PDC certification, and I don't see why becoming a master gardener shouldn't give you college credits too. While you are at it take a few CLEP test and get your credits.
 
John Weiland
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Kim Taylor wrote: ... I'm interested in agriculture, but not run-of-the-mill conventional monoculture farming. So, I'm looking for a program (not a major) at a college that would offer this education online. Anyone know if any good programs out there?



I'm biased, but I would start here:   https://agsci.oregonstate.edu/academics/students/undergraduate-degrees

and note that they have offered a Permaculture Design Course in the past:  https://open.oregonstate.edu/courses/permaculture/

Good luck!....
 
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It warms my heart that so many people are choosing history—but then I am a little biased being a history teacher and all.

But for those who said history, what type/era would you study?  History is a huge field, no one can possibly learn it all.  Would you want ancient or recent?  Western vs non western?  Conventional vs revisionist?  I could go on ad nauseam.  

Personally my interest was in American history and WWII.  The WWII part actually gave the best background as having learned the European war, I wanted to learn all the precedents to WWII.  I also wanted to know all the histories that were geographically adjacent to Western Europe.  

I used to say (and still do) that I wanted to learn from WWII back and from Western Europe out.  I have studied quite a lot of different cultures and eras by using the lens of WWII.

Eric
 
S Bengi
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I like what they are offering
https://ecampus.oregonstate.edu/soc/ecatalog/ecourselist.htm?termcode=all&subject=HORT
 
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Landscape Design or Pre-Columbian History.

 
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well at this time in my life - i might be interested in architecture/city planning/engineering, or some kind of trade skill. maybe really light weight medical stuff...like less than nursing properly, but something like lab tech or to work with the elderly.....

i dont know if you could do any of that online, but maybe like...sponsored independent learning through a state or community college or something.

when i was actually in college, and apparently less practical (!) - art, any craft i could get a class on, art history, i studied welding, metals, working with clay - both sculpture and ceramics, and i took lots of fine art classes in many different mediums. then i went back to college, studied more art !!! and also did some pre med type stuff, anatomy and physiology, herbs.

and obviously you have your reasons, but i dont think i would want to do it all online. actually going and being there...doing the whole thing, making connections and all of it, definitely something i would rather do in person.

 
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I would have to ask myself if I was seeking an education or a job.
 
leila hamaya
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well, not completely on topic (no online) but in the ballpark...Evergreen State College offers a lot of different natural science courses, has a whole permaculture curriculum, has a large agriculture program and extensive gardens on campus....and a lot of related classes.

the Evergreen State college was originally founded on a large clear cut in Washington state, and it has like...thousands of acres of forest surrounding it as the campus. so students do hands on learning with all sorts of natural sciences, identifying wild plants, studying the unique ecosystems in the puget sound, and it is even on the water so lots of opportunities for up close and personal study of the forest and nature.

it's definitely a weird niche, like i know some wouldnt benefit from it as much as more straight college, but i rather think it's a wonderful place, for someone who isnt as inclined towards a "normal" college.
this was the second college i went to, many many years ago now...but i fully enjoyed my time there and benefitted from it in many ways, though i was there for learning and not as practical in my studies, and not so much for the liberal arts degree. you know, everything they taught there was something i was interested in, although again i mostly still just studied art. helpful for me, i got in state tuition, cause i lived in washington for a long time,and basically went there for free back then, with all the grants and etc.

they also have a lot of more practical pursuits...being a state school there is various programs oriented towards working in administration of state programs, getting qualified to deal with bureaucracy basically...around land, preservation of land and the like... and "native studies".

i did just check, though, no online stuff. but since i looked it up i will link some things for someone else who might want to check it out --->

Evergreen's Permaculture program

Demeter's garden

agriculture at Evergreen

organic farm at Evergreen

Evergreen's current classes --> https://www.evergreen.edu/catalog/index?year=4&offered=All

Masters in environmental studies
 
S Bengi
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You can take a CLEP test for $100 and get 3 credits for most if not all of you year 1 and year 2 courses so $2,000 for 60credits  or $3,000 for 90credits. Community Colleges and state colleges will take your CLEP credits,
You can then do your last 2 years, online or in person.  
 
John Weiland
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S Bengi wrote:....Community Colleges and state colleges will take your CLEP credits,
You can then do your last 2 years, online or in person.  



This is a consideration few people take advantage of.  In my region, there is one major state university, one moderate-size state college, one small-size but wacko-expensive private college, and several tech schools.  The state university would be the best place to graduate from if you are looking to do some sort of advanced project in your Junior or Senior year of undergraduate, and is moderately priced as far as US state universities run.  With some investigation, it can generally be juggled to do the first two years at either a tech school or the state college at the less expensive institution, then transfer to the state university to get the final degree.  Pretty good cost savings as long as one checks out all the pros and cons.  Even some of those attending the private college have woken up to the debt load and transferred, realizing that for only a few types of degrees would staying at the private uni give them any benefit in the long run.
 
John Weiland
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leila hamaya wrote:
it's definitely a weird niche, like i know some wouldnt benefit from it as much as more straight college, but i rather think it's a wonderful place, for someone who isnt as inclined towards a "normal" college.



I was a 'Greener for the 79-80 academic year and fully agree.  It was a bit unorthodox and I was not in the right mindset to take advantage of that, so bailed for a more traditional institution.  Nevertheless, I know of several from those years who completed their degrees in the sciences and went on to full careers in their field.  From memory, a fantastic setting and great model for a campus and education.
 
leila hamaya
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John Weiland wrote:

leila hamaya wrote:
it's definitely a weird niche, like i know some wouldnt benefit from it as much as more straight college, but i rather think it's a wonderful place, for someone who isnt as inclined towards a "normal" college.



I was a 'Greener for the 79-80 academic year and fully agree.  It was a bit unorthodox and I was not in the right mindset to take advantage of that, so bailed for a more traditional institution.  Nevertheless, I know of several from those years who completed their degrees in the sciences and went on to full careers in their field.  From memory, a fantastic setting and great model for a campus and education.



thats interesting! it must have been really coolio back in those old days =)

i attended in...ahhh let me see i want to say 2002 - 2004 or thereabouts. i did some science stuffs and also did a bunch of art classes there. it was pretty great =)
then i did my independent contract and worked on papermaking and book binding, so i got full credit working independantly and checking in with my teacher.

i had oddles of fun and was really inspired and into it, the times i took the more regular ish academic type classes there... you know i am a knowledge geek, so it was really great for me at that time.
but yeah i fit their weird niche anyway =) being extremely liberal / radical...i guess...are some words.

i would not have gone back to college actually if it wasnt for evergreen.
i know, i am definitely not cut out for regular college ! i just decided to go because it was just that cool. plus like i said it was cheap, so basically free for me, because i qualified for grants.

plus i used to sell a lot of my crafts there. so...even before and after that time i used to set up and do craft days at evergreen. for quite a few years. and so that was fun too...selling a bunch of crafts and setting up little booths and tables...or sometimes just outside in that big square. =)
 
John Weiland
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leila hamaya wrote:

.... it must have been really coolio back in those old days =)



Yeah, that's right....rub it in! :-)  But you are right, it's a great place for the right attitude.  I knew some who lived on the other side of the Sound and kayaked to classes for the day, then kayaked home.  Shortly before classes ended in May of 1980, Mount St. Helens erupted and we awoke to a thin layer of ash all over campus.....kinda spooky.

Anyway, good to hear that they've expanded the alternative ag offerings and permaculture projects....and tuition looks as reasonable as it can be this day in age.  As you noted, Evergreen really promoted 'hands-on' learning and this would be a great venue in which to immerse one's self such schooling.  

[....outside of Wheaton Labs, of course! ;-)  ]

Good to hear from another Geoduck!....
 
leila hamaya
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John Weiland wrote:

leila hamaya wrote:

.... it must have been really coolio back in those old days =)



Yeah, that's right....rub it in! :-)  But you are right, it's a great place for the right attitude.  I knew some who lived on the other side of the Sound and kayaked to classes for the day, then kayaked home.  Shortly before classes ended in May of 1980, Mount St. Helens erupted and we awoke to a thin layer of ash all over campus.....kinda spooky.

Anyway, good to hear that they've expanded the alternative ag offerings and permaculture projects....and tuition looks as reasonable as it can be this day in age.  As you noted, Evergreen really promoted 'hands-on' learning and this would be a great venue in which to immerse one's self such schooling.  

[....outside of Wheaton Labs, of course! ;-)  ]

Good to hear from another Geoduck!....



well you may know and maybe utilized  --> there's a bomb shelter there. underneath the huge open area right out front. i have never been there, but before it was evergreen, a giant bunker was built down there....as far as how i heard it.
in the red square...
 
leila hamaya
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but yeah...best college for wild child nature lovers =) hippie generation 2.0 , and extremely liberal and progressive thinkers/activist/etc...

actually there's a lot you can do there, the masters of environmental science programs, and actually all of their science programs are really excellent. if you do want to do something dealing with state and fed government, or do tribal government or any kind of administrative type position in natural science, you can definitely do that there. as well they have great offerings for art programs

and i like the whole basis, which is "interdisciplinary". so you take one program and it has an art AND a science component, and some more traditional lectures and seminars and writing papers mixed in...so yeah it's everything rolled together and interconnected. art, science, language/cultural, history...in one program. and i of course i like the independent studies option, though it was a lot of work, putting it all together. Evergreen is definitely a school where you get out of it what you put in, it works well for someone who is self directed and already has an idea of what they want to do. and most people do the indpendant learning, where they write their proposal and then do entirely self directed study for a year. basically be your own teacher, you plan out a course for yourself and then check in with your faculty person to check of your original goals.

but yeah geared towards a different audience than more straight colleges.
 
Ellendra Nauriel
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Kim Taylor wrote:

Ellendra Nauriel wrote:Paid to study online? Where do I sign up?



The US military. 😂 Just sign away your rights for a few years.




I actually tried that back when I was a senior in high school. I didn't pass the health requirements.

Hope it works out well for you!
 
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