• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Ash Jackson
  • Kate Downham

My goji berries taste awful.

 
Posts: 171
Location: Appalachian Foothills-Zone 7
28
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What's up?  They are very bitter, like something that should not be eaten...
 
pollinator
Posts: 1560
Location: Victoria BC
219
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Did you grow them from seed?

I am not a huge fan of them, but the fruit from seedlings my friend grew were definitely inedible, much worse compared to berries from a known cultivar..
 
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have named varieties and they taste awful.  Maybe air drying might make them taste better?
 
Gray Henon
Posts: 171
Location: Appalachian Foothills-Zone 7
28
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

D Nikolls wrote:Did you grow them from seed?

I am not a huge fan of them, but the fruit from seedlings my friend grew were definitely inedible, much worse compared to berries from a known cultivar..



Came from a nursery.  Guy told me it was a good variety.
 
gardener
Posts: 3181
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1163
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like mine, but they do need to be very ripe.

Is this one of those, "Cilantro tastes like soap" things? There are definitely differences in human taste buds and some people will taste "bitter" compounds that others can't taste. This is beyond the more normal "acquired taste" and is apparently affected by age - "bitter" is often much more tolerated by older humans than younger ones according to something I read. Of course, where humans are concerned, rules were meant to be broken or at least bent!
 
Posts: 383
Location: St. George, UT. Zone 8a Dry/arid. 8" of rain in a good year.
104
trees bike greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have two types.  One is Chinense? and it's very bitter.  Tons of tiny berries, and I normally just let the birds eat them.  They stay green through winter here in zone 8a, but suffer through the summer, and often defoliate in July/August.

I have another variety I grew from seed from the grocery store bulk bin.  Those are sweeter (nothing special) about twice the size of the others (still pretty small), and don't do nearly as well as the Chinense.   They go dormant in winter, and look terrible in July/August.

I'm not impressed with either.

 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 3181
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1163
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Joshua Bertram wrote:I have two types.  One is Chinense? and it's very bitter.  Tons of tiny berries, and I normally just let the birds eat them.  They stay green through winter here in zone 8a, but suffer through the summer, and often defoliate in July/August.

I have another variety I grew from seed from the grocery store bulk bin.  Those are sweeter (nothing special) about twice the size of the others (still pretty small), and don't do nearly as well as the Chinense.   They go dormant in winter, and look terrible in July/August.

I'm not impressed with either.

Joshua, do the plants look the same? Or close? I have a vague recollection when I was researching the plants years ago that what the grocery store calls "goji" berry and what was originally called goji berry in Asia, were two different plants from different genii.

They're certainly uncommon enough where I am that who knows what I actually ended up with!
 
Joshua Bertram
Posts: 383
Location: St. George, UT. Zone 8a Dry/arid. 8" of rain in a good year.
104
trees bike greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jay, no, I wouldn't say they look the same.  The store bought goji leaves are long and narrow, and the Chinense (or what I believe is the Chinense variety) is much wider and about the same length.   Also, the store bought gojis are growing much taller (over eight feet), but less dense.  The Chinense seem to be much fuller, but more squatty (about four to five feet tall).

I only had one small berry on the store bought right now, but earlier in the year they were about twice the size of what's in the picture.  
Vs. the hundreds of ripe berries on the Chinense (more bitter).

The Chinense are much more happy here.  They seem to produce 100x more berries, and look healthier in general.

IMG_20201017_164538317.jpg
Store bought. About 8'
Store bought. About 8' tall. Hard to see with bird gourd.
IMG_20201017_164555581_HDR.jpg
Store bought, leaves.
Store bought, leaves.
IMG_20201017_164706048_HDR.jpg
Store bought, berry. They're normally about twice this size.
Store bought, berry. They're normally about twice this size.
IMG_20201017_164755155_HDR.jpg
Chinense growing up fence.
Chinense growing up fence.
IMG_20201017_164721172.jpg
Lot's of Chinense berries everywhere.
Lot's of Chinense berries everywhere.
IMG_20201017_164742838.jpg
Leaves and berries of Chinense.
Leaves and berries of Chinense.
IMG_20201017_164824084_HDR.jpg
Comparison of Chinense leaf in hand, and store bought leaves growing.
Comparison of Chinense leaf in hand, and store bought leaves growing.
 
Posts: 21
Location: Vancouver Island
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I purchased a plant last year, some berries, but birds got them, this year no berries.  I took a few cuttings & just put them in soil, now transplanted a couple beside original goji plant, will see what happens next year I guess.
 
Story like this gets better after being told a few times. Or maybe it's just a tiny ad:
BWB second printing, pre-order dealio (poor man's poll)
https://permies.com/t/147624/BWB-printing-pre-order-dealio
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic