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Learning to use power tools - video recommendations please

 
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Does anyone have any favourite YouTube video series for introductory woodworking/power tool use?

I'm looking for something that shows safety, tips and tricks and is really thorough and assumes I haven't a clue what I am doing but want to do things safely and efficiently.

Seems to be a million videos out there, but most assume you know what you are doing, or don't go into any detail at all, or are just trying to sell a particular product.  

I took an intro to table saws workshop a few years ago that was really worthwhile.  it covered safety and taught several ways to use the table saw and how to build jigs for it. Tips like "stand here", "don't put your hands there' and "don't do this!" Or 'its easier if you do this!'

I have a couple day woodworking project that would save me about 75% of the cost to DIY plus teach me a few useful skills, and currently have more time than money, but don't know how to use a planer, a router, or a jig saw. I don't want to lose a finger while trying to save $500.
 
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I suspect the education system in your country is presently better off than the one in mine. In my area shop classed are being closed down. By any means, you may want to contact someone whi teaches in this area for advice on resources.

Community Homework’s has about a two hour series on power tools on YouTube.
 
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Catie ,

Power Tools is a pretty broad categorization.  Can you narrow that down a bit.  You mentioned table saws and they have the potential to be one of the most dangerous power tools out there due to a phenomena they can induce called kickback.  Since the wood is slid over the table surface into saw teeth spinning at the users direction, it is possible for a piece of wood to Kick Back, or fly off the table right at the user.  I had a neighbor growing up who was using a table saw and was a victim of kickback and was impaled by a piece of wood.  Ultimately he was OK, but it did require an ambulance trip (no way was he driving himself!) and an ER visit.  BTW, today there are a number of anti-kickback devices that can limit the risk of kickback.  I had the opportunity to inherit a table saw and passed as there was absolutely no safety protection.

But every tool has its own potential danger so if you can narrow down the list, that would be really helpful.

Eric
 
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If you don't already have the power tools I personally believe that hand tools are an equal or superior solution for considerably better price. They are also more intuitive, and easier to understand the obvious "this part is sharp so don't touch."
 
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I'd recommend instead the series by Paul Sellers, AKA the minimalist woodworker, who teaches how to use hand tools.
 
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Essential Craftsman is a YouTube channel that I really like.   He has a lot of videos and finding the ones that you'll consider useful will take some time, but I bet they are there.

 
This video isn't about power tools but is good stuff permies will enjoy.  I like this video and think it takes the suggestion of the previous post into consideration...use hand tools. By doing so, one learns the physics behind the tool, which in the long run builds one's understanding of the utility and risk of power tools.


This is kind of along the lines of what you're looking for...maybe the follow up video suggestions will have more.

Hope this helps. Learning power tools is something that requires time, patience and practice.  Respect the tool, but have no fear.  Good luck.

-M

 
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This is a pretty good guide for table saws.



Re YouTube - just add the word “safety” to your searches.
 
Catie George
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I've looked around for in person education locally at the community colleges, recreation centres, etc, and haven't found anything in the 2 hour radius I have looked in.

I took the 4 hour table saw class when I was living in the city, and wanted to take their 6 week intro to furniture building class but unfortunately traveled too much to ever be in town for 6 consecutive weeks. Now I have the time, but nowhere to take classes.

So - need to find good online sources.

Power tools I need to use (and haven't used before)

Router, jig saw or scroll saw,  thickness planer.

Power tools I need to use (and have used before)

Table saw, sanders, drill  

Planer is a rental. Sanders and drill are mine. Other stuff is being borrowed from my parents. The only tools being purchased are a bunch of clamps which I would need even if I purchased the stuff precut and shaped.

My parents own lots of tools but have never used most of them - at one point my mother liked to buy my father tools and accessory sets as gifts before eventually realizing Dad never took most of them out of the box. She has also bought herself a few tools since they separated and never learned to use them.  Plus Dad bought himself more tools thinking he would use them. So there are a bunch of tools sitting around that no one knows how to use, many still in original boxes, most reasonably good quality since during the tool buying years, my mom worked with tradespeople who told her what to look for and buy. It'll be one hell of an estate sale at some point.

Project in a nutshell, AKA Catie repairs a canoe
Rip very long boards into as narrow-as practical pieces going very very slowly. Put them through the planer to slowly shave off more  to reach 1/2" x 1" x 17'.  4 boards total, have materials for 8 boards since I will likely break a few. If I break more than 4 or I find this impossible, scarf joint them together and epoxy (not ideal). Router an edge. Sand. Clamp and screw on.  This project saves me about $400.

Rip and cut up a shorter rough cut hardwood board. Possibly use the planer since I have it  rented anyways. Use a jig saw or scrollsaw (depending on which I can find in the barn) and a template to cut some pieces to shape. Router edges. Sand. Drill holes. Screw on/bolt on, or glue, as applicable.  3 jig sawed/scroll sawed pieces, 8 cut to size and routered pieces. This project saves me $100-200.

I will practice on scrap board before cutting into the real wood I plan to use.
 
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Sure, just type in "worth the effort" into a search engine.
IF you start with the series at the beginning and work your way through much of woodworking is explained in detail.

The dude is a good Instructor!  I copied these out, turned into PDF files similar to the attached, and sent them to a person who asked if I would help him learn about woodworking just after receiving the first couple of "Lessons".

See the attached PDF for an example of the Print that also comes with the lessons!
Filename: -01_Tools-Discussed-In-Beginning-Wood-Working-Video_-01.pdf
File size: 52 Kbytes
Staff note (Catie George) :

Here's the YouTube link:

https://youtube.com/channel/UCxOSP6n0wTzGIDWfNHqHCgA

 
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        Howdy Catie,

               Love what you're on about! Here's what I would do, find a person in a woodworking shop, meaning go there in person to the shop, tell them your situation and ask for help. However, I like analogue things and learning from people. I took the liberty of searching woodworkers in Ontario: A Facebook page came up  https://www.facebook.com/groups/185125965312293/ and also, http://www.canadian-woodworker.com/. and the third https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/courses which looks to be what you might want.  


          Best of luck in your search,


         Thomas
 
Jesse Glessner
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You might also look for local woodworking groups through friends, relatives, businesses.

I walked out of out local hardware store one day and saw a truck with a woodworking business name on it. I assumed it belonged to the guy that came into the store just as I was leaving and went back to ask him about woodworking groups. I was interested in ANY type of woodworking but more specifically a CNC Router group. That guy actually invited me to the next meeting of a CNC group that meets in a to3wn an hours drive away and it has worked out GREAT for me. This old dude has learned a lot from all of the other old dude members of that group.

Benefits of a group is that you can ask all kinds of questions, And especially if you're a newbie, you can get tons of help either at meetings, by phone, or by 'social media' from members.

Another good source that I have is from the company where I bought my CNC Router system. They have a fantastic support group.

SO, check around. Maybe from a group you can find 1 or 2 members willing to either Teach or Help you.

Hope you have as much luck as I've had in finding support!
 
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Stumpy Nubbs woodworking journal is just now starting to become available. He has many good videos on using power tools.

Wood by Wright has lots of videos on only using hand tools. Incredible videos both.

Good luck
 
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video resource Highland Woodworking
 
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L. Johnson wrote:If you don't already have the power tools I personally believe that hand tools are an equal or superior solution for considerably better price. They are also more intuitive, and easier to understand the obvious "this part is sharp so don't touch."



Personally I collect both hand and power tools. That way if the job is small I can grab my hand tools and be done quickly. But if the job is large I grab my power tools. For example while I could cut points on 2 dozen 1x2’s for staking my tomatoes but on a hot day it was much more pleasant to set up my chop saw and whip out 2 dozen stakes in about 5 minutes. Versus 2 minutes to cut two by hand.

As for learning to use tools, in my opinion there is no substitute fir hands on. Look for wood working forums and connect with people in your area. Most wood workers are happy to to share and teach. Many will invite you to their shop to try out a tool and learn to use it safely before you buy.
 
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Steve Ramsey, AKA Wood Working for Mere Mortals, has a really good beginners course.  It's a paid course.  I believe it is called "The weekend woodworker."  He also keeps an updated listed of tools to get a woodworking shop set up for under $1000.  Steve is almost exclusively power tools.

Rex Kruger has a lot of youtube videos explaining how to use tools.  He covers what tools to buy, how to get them ready, how to use them and such.  Rex has transitioned to nearly all hand tools in recent years.  (almost no electric tools)

I've gotten lots of ideas from Steve Ramsey, Rex Kruger, and Stumpy Nubs.
 
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