new video from paul! (permies thread)
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Something that could out compete blackberries  RSS feed

 
Renee Banks
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi All

Don't know if it's possible, but would like some ideas on plants that could out compete blackberries and prevent them, or at least reduce them from growing back.

Ive ripped and dug out blackberries as best I could and have tried smothering the ground with thick newspaper and a thick layer of mulch, trouble is this eventually breaks down and then any blackberry canes Ive missed grow prolifically.

I was wondering if there was a plant, or even a combination of plants I could put there, which would if not prevent any missed canes from growing back, then at least retard their growth and reduce their vigour...and not become major problem themselves...

I live in a warm temperate climate, the spot where they are growing is in part shade and is on the fence line.

Look forward to any suggestions!
 
Anthony Minot
Posts: 22
Location: Rockledge, FL
fish fungi urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can't think of any plant that could outdo it without being as much of a problem in the end (That's just me, someone here might know of one). What I did when me and my mom moved into a house that had this issue in the front yard was to get rid of any leftovers, sift out anything as big as a pinkienail. Then every couple days till for about 2 weeks then let it sit for a week and see if there are any growing. Repeat one more time wether or not there are any growing just in case and then it should be good (repeat if not remember it takes as much persistence as the plant has). Mind you it took forever to find this method and I found out from my grandfather (rest his soul) and it was in 98 so I'm sure there are more practical methods now I just haven't run into this issue since then.
 
Anthony Minot
Posts: 22
Location: Rockledge, FL
fish fungi urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Renee Banks wrote:I live in a warm temperate climate, the spot where they are growing is in part shade and is on the fence line.


How deep is the fence? did the roots come from there?and if so from under or next to it?
 
Renee Banks
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes there are some that unfortunately coming from the otherside, from underneath my neighbours fence,  though most are on my side, the ones on his side are my escapees. The fence isnt deep, its a wooden fence tha sits at ground level.
 
John Elliott
pollinator
Posts: 2392
79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oregano.  I have blackberries that come up anywhere and everywhere EXCEPT in the oregano patch.  Oregano is more well-behaved, it's not going to pop up 20 feet away like a blackberry, but it does spread (slowly).
 
Renee Banks
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oregano, thats one id like to try, thanks.
 
Anthony Minot
Posts: 22
Location: Rockledge, FL
fish fungi urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
John Elliott wrote: I have blackberries that come up anywhere and everywhere EXCEPT in the oregano patch.

Would It do to plant on, or around then inwards for the vicinity of the invasion? A fresh layer of soil with mixed in germinated oregano seeds should do good if they are as effective as that I would think. Then at that point it would be just weeding for BB sprouts. Try to see if your neighbor wouldn't mind planting some on thier fence edge as a just in case. (These are just thoughts on what I would do)
 
John Elliott
pollinator
Posts: 2392
79
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anthony Minot wrote:
Would It do to plant on, or around then inwards for the vicinity of the invasion? A fresh layer of soil with mixed in germinated oregano seeds should do good if they are as effective as that I would think.


Germinated oregano seeds is not going to cut it.  I should expand on my previous comment by saying that I have oregano patches that are going on 7 years old.  They all started from a couple of 3" pots I got from the markdown rack at the nursery.  It doesn't spread much each year, but it is tenuous.  If you want to get good coverage (it makes an excellent ground cover, even out-competing centipede and bermuda grasses), you need to get some healthy plants in 3" pots and space them maybe every 8-12" and let them fill in.  It takes quite a while, maybe 3-4 months for oregano seed sown in a 3" pot to be ready to set out, so this is one occasion where going to the nursery will cut down on your frustration level. 

Once it is established, you can run over it regularly with the lawn mower, and it will still be spreading and evicting grass plants.  Fortunately, it spreads so slowly that I haven't had to get serious about cutting it back.  And if you do, you can always just dry it and shake it on your pizza.
 
Anthony Minot
Posts: 22
Location: Rockledge, FL
fish fungi urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ok makes sense, great info for future planning.
 
Daron Williams
Posts: 138
Location: Olympia, WA - Zone 8a/b
19
bee bike books food preservation forest garden fungi hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nootka rose can beat out blackberries and is native to the Pacific Northwest.
 
Renee Banks
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Daron Williams wrote:Nootka rose can beat out blackberries and is native to the Pacific Northwest.


Theyre a pretty plant, not sure if I can find them here in Australia but good to know, thanks.
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
Posts: 1356
Location: northern California
42
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would consider some kind of rank, fast, climbing vine that could run up and over the blackberry thicket and shade and smother it.  A vigorous variety of winter squash, running cowpeas, grapes, velvet beans or some other annual legume might be worth trying.  Replant the annuals every year around the edges, densely, and try to provide them with a competitive advantage in moisture and fertility.  The ultimate player, of course, would be kudzu, but that might be replacing one problem with a worse one!
 
Mary Christine Nestor
Posts: 20
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I planted two or three oregano plants a few years ago on our last property and they in two or three years became a lawn cover over a rather large area. The blackberries were unaffected but they were quite a distance uphill from the oregano. We had bumper crops of blackberries for close to ten years running. The thorn-less cultivars out produced the wild ones at the back edge of the property. My husband was more than willing to pick those from the former but no one really wanted to be stuck with thorns so we generally left the wild ones for the deer and birds.
 
Genevieve Higgs
Posts: 34
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Last spring I went all around my rental's yard pruning black berries off at the ground.  I repeated once or twice a month.  At the start I was just thinking about reducing the weight of blackberry vines crushing down on the more decorative bushes.  Now most vines are gone, or come in all soft and tender.  It used to be hard work, this year it seems very minimal, it might be possible to eliminate it if I spent another few years doing it.  With selective pruning of only black berry vines all the other bushes seem to have done better.  It even turns out there was ivy and wisteria under the black berries!

One thing I regret is that I planted two mint between my raised beds and the bramble groves.  Now there are a few black berry tendrils coming up in the beds and a lot of mint.  At least it works in smoothies and mojitos and doesn't leave alergic scratches all over my hands.
 
Renee Banks
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Alder Burns wrote:I would consider some kind of rank, fast, climbing vine that could run up and over the blackberry thicket and shade and smother it.  A vigorous variety of winter squash, running cowpeas, grapes, velvet beans or some other annual legume might be worth trying.  Replant the annuals every year around the edges, densely, and try to provide them with a competitive advantage in moisture and fertility.  The ultimate player, of course, would be kudzu, but that might be replacing one problem with a worse one!


I like the idea of legumes.  Im thinking I will try oregano to cover the bulk of it and also an annual legume near the fence line, ill have to try a few and see which one thrives in that spot.  I like the idea of things I can use in the  kitchen.  I may also trial a globe artichoke plant there as well as I know they grow like weeds with zero maintenance in my backyard but Im not sure how theyll do in part shade.

If all else fails i guess i could put canna lillies there, they also thrive in my yard with zero maintenance but I already have them in a patch near the back and dont really want more.  But theyd be better than the blackberries which are unfortunately thriving right near my clothesline and things can get caught on windy days...
 
Renee Banks
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Genevieve Higgs wrote:Last spring I went all around my rental's yard pruning black berries off at the ground.  I repeated once or twice a month.  At the start I was just thinking about reducing the weight of blackberry vines crushing down on the more decorative bushes.  Now most vines are gone, or come in all soft and tender.  It used to be hard work, this year it seems very minimal, it might be possible to eliminate it if I spent another few years doing it.  With selective pruning of only black berry vines all the other bushes seem to have done better.  It even turns out there was ivy and wisteria under the black berries!

One thing I regret is that I planted two mint between my raised beds and the bramble groves.  Now there are a few black berry tendrils coming up in the beds and a lot of mint.  At least it works in smoothies and mojitos and doesn't leave alergic scratches all over my hands.


Its good to know that pruning to the ground works in reducing their vigour.  Some of the blackberry roots are in such awkward spots (under a concrete path, and on the other side of the fence that I cant rip them out completely.
 
David Livingston
steward
Posts: 3074
Location: Anjou ,France
141
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
actually the only thing I know that can outcompete brambles is ........a goat
 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 852
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have the same problem. At the creek on public land the council sprays. I run over and chase them away. I would like to borrow a goat but then if I tether her I would be afraid that she gets hurt...A brush cutter seams to be too dangerous.
 
Renee Banks
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
David Livingston wrote:actually the only thing I know that can outcompete brambles is ........a goat


Lol I wish I could bring a goat into my backyard, it would be in heaven!
 
Lasagna is spaghetti flvored cake. Just like this tiny ad:
Mike Oehler's Low-Cost Underground House Workshop & Survival Shelter Seminar - 3 DVD+2 Books Deal
https://permies.com/wiki/48625/Mike-Oehler-Cost-Underground-House
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!