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Deep Pantry for people who like food

 
steward
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Jackie Frobese wrote:

Jocelyn,  My sister has these containers for her flour sugar etc on the counter. They do have an effective seal and are easy enough to get the lid on and off. So I would give them a thumbs up. Just figured a review may be helpful for you.


Yes, a review *does* help! Thank you, Jackie, that is very good to know.
 
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Location: New Hampshire, USA zone 5/6
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:

Jackie Frobese wrote:

Jocelyn,  My sister has these containers for her flour sugar etc on the counter. They do have an effective seal and are easy enough to get the lid on and off. So I would give them a thumbs up. Just figured a review may be helpful for you.


Yes, a review *does* help! Thank you, Jackie, that is very good to know.



Well I just had a convo with my sister, she says brown sugar seems to dry out. That could reflect poorly on the seal depending on your needs. On the up side she says the rubber seal inside can be removed and cleaned if needed.
 
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Great information here
 
pollinator
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Ahh, right, another point against using flame around dusty things like flour.

grain dust explosions.





and a more text version.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dust_explosion


99.999% of the time it'll be fine.    


Just don't sneeze.
 
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Nitrogen packed foods are the gold standard for dry goods like grains and beans for long-term storage. However this is a very expensive product to buy. It's also road if we cheap to make. Or do. Two nitrogen pack something. You get an airtight container. When you put a piece of dry ice in the bottom of the container. And let it smoke. When there is about half full of smoke. Slowly pour your grain or beans through the smoke. This is a nitrogen gas. It is heavier than oxygen. It displaces all the oxygen below it. It is important not to create vortexes with the grains going in. Once you get the container full. Wait for the gases to percolate up through. And roll over the sides of the container. At this point. You put the airtight lid on. Anything that uses oxygen that is inside that container will die. Therefore there is no Weevil or any other bugs. Also oxygen is a degrader of all things food. The nitrogen is not.
 
Richard Stromberg
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For long-term storage. You can't beat a seal a meal and a home food freeze dryer. They're about $2,000. But it's 6 or $8 a meal for freeze-dried materials. It doesn't take long to recoup your money. Put out the extra money for the oil-less pump. The use by date on freeze-dried materials is 25 years. But it will keep much longer than that.
 
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I didn't read everything, so forgive me if its been mentioned before. Mylar bags, which can be vacuum sealed or toss in an oxygen absorbed and seal with a flat iron. other way of doing it can be an actual CO2 canister and filling it with a hose. as stated, Nitrogen is the gold standard, but unless I'm mistaken, that is because Nitrogen is an inert noble gas. would probably be better, but perhaps more expensive.

Anyway, you can reseal mylar bags, though you lose a small bit each time, depending on width of the seal. You could repackage the grain into however much would fit in a jar at once, then just open one to refill the jar.

Freeze drying is good for fruits, veg and meat but i don't know how much good it would be for grains, since ideally they don't have much moisture to begin with. long term consideration/concern would just be the maintenance on the freeze-dryer itself.
 
Richard Stromberg
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Morgwino Stur wrote:I didn't read everything, so forgive me if its been mentioned before. Mylar bags, which can be vacuum sealed or toss in an oxygen absorbed and seal with a flat iron. other way of doing it can be an actual CO2 canister and filling it with a hose. as stated, Nitrogen is the gold standard, but unless I'm mistaken, that is because Nitrogen is an inert noble gas. would probably be better, but perhaps more expensive.

Anyway, you can reseal mylar bags, though you lose a small bit each time, depending on width of the seal. You could repackage the grain into however much would fit in a jar at once, then just open one to refill the jar.

Freeze drying is good for fruits, veg and meat but i don't know how much good it would be for grains, since ideally they don't have much moisture to begin with. long term consideration/concern would just be the maintenance on the freeze-dryer itself.

nitrogen is cheep and at every grocery store... DRY ICE melts into nitrogen gas. Put a small piece in your container anthen slowly fill through the"smoke" and seal. Kills all oxygen dependent life forms(weivle and such) also stops oxidizing
 
gardener
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Dry ice is the solid form of carbon dioxide.
It does exclude oxygen.
 
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