• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
  • r ranson
  • Jay Angler
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
  • Nicole Alderman
master gardeners:
  • Timothy Norton
  • Christopher Weeks
gardeners:
  • Saana Jalimauchi
  • Jeremy VanGelder
  • Ulla Bisgaard
 
pollinator
Posts: 2945
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
951
dog forest garden urban cooking bike fiber arts
  • Likes 17
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I gave the book a 9 out of 10.
Why not 10? There are two reasons. 1. It is Paul's way of speaking; I know it from his podcasts, but someone who did never listen to him may find some expressions a little strange. 2. It is probably written for people in Northern America. In many European countries the situation (rules and regulations) is different.
 
Posts: 48
Location: Strasbourg, France
12
tiny house chicken bee
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:

Janie Brackett wrote:While selling my adult children’s books, I have been slowly sowing seeds! Infecting minds!

I have a small shop on eBay and I mostly sell books. Many a person has ordered manga from me and also received a free copy of Build a Better World. It is rare that I cannot make the book fit, but mailing an LP vinyl record was one occasion.

I have the Build a Better World book also listed for sale in my shop. There haven’t been any takers, but I hope it dispels the “what the heck?” a little bit.

While I volunteer at our Friends of the Library bookstore, I try to hand out copies to interested folk. “It’s a free book from me. You don’t have to pay for it,” usually results the book going to a happy new home.

Glad I finally had a moment to share this with you. Have a great day!


Janie, it's a pity my book is in Dutch. I wrote it for 'adult children', who want to learn about permaculture, here in the Netherlands. It will be published soon.

I only write this here because you wrote 'adult children's books'. I like that! But probably this is the opposite of the books you mean. My book has plenty of illustrations to make things clear, but most of it is 'words'. It is not 'manga' at all.

But let's go on 'infecting brains with permaculture'. Also in the Netherlands (my free copies are all spread over the country now)



Hey Inge,

I was looking for something entirely different, but came across your post that you wrote a book in Dutch. I've translated a book from Dutch to English before and if you'd like we could look into that with your book too? I've the experience in English as I have lived in the UK long enough and also Dutch as I grew up in the Netherlands. It could also be a great way for me to learn more about permaculture

Do let me know!
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
pollinator
Posts: 2945
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
951
dog forest garden urban cooking bike fiber arts
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Niels van Wensen wrote:

Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:

Janie Brackett wrote:While selling my adult children’s books, I...!


Janie, it's a pity my book is in Dutch. I wrote it for 'adult children', who want to learn about permaculture, here in the Netherlands. It will be published soon.
...



Hey Inge,

I was looking for something entirely different, but came across your post that you wrote a book in Dutch. I've translated a book from Dutch to English before and if you'd like we could look into that with your book too? I've the experience in English as I have lived in the UK long enough and also Dutch as I grew up in the Netherlands. It could also be a great way for me to learn more about permaculture

Do let me know!


Hi Niels. I only see this now. I was on a bicycle-camping-tour for two weeks. Meaning I wasn't active online.
Thank you for offering to help translate my book to English. But to say the truth: I did not write this 'educational story' for an international public. The story and the educational part of it are aimed at the situation here in the Netherlands.

It would take much more than only translating from Dutch into English to make it fit for 'adult children' living in other countries. And because it has taken me some years to write, re-write, correct and re-write again to make it ready for publication (and to draw the illustrations), re-writing it again to make it fit for the international market is not something I want to do now
 
Posts: 13
Location: Watertown NY, Zone 4a
2
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I found BABW in a funky antique and craft store while I was on vacation in Isle Minnesota a few weeks ago. I'm already more than halfway through it. I noticed that throughout the book there are urls to various threads here at Permies which expound upon the ideas espoused in the book. Has anybody indexed all of the links anywhere at Permies?
 
pioneer
Posts: 178
Location: Hainault, Essex, England
44
trees tiny house earthworks food preservation building homestead
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This looks like an amazing book! I’m going to buy the SKIP book first… This year myself and my partner went plastic free as much as possible (using compostable bin, poo and shopping bags). I’m also using natural beauty, bathroom and kitchen products (my plants love the lavender washing-up liquid with grey water). One can make a lot of positive impact to the environment by changing one small thing at a time. I’m looking forward to trying out your suggestions too. Thank you! Gemma
 
Posts: 22
9
2
homeschooling bee woodworking
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I give this book 9.9 out of 10 acorns.

This book would be good for someone who:

- is new to permaculture and would like a overview of many topics (this is the major reason to read this book)
- wants to have a homestead but doesn't know where to start (further reading required)
- wants book reccomendations on permaculture topics
- has never heard of permaculture but is interested in gardening/raising animals/homesteading

I thought this book was well done and I quite enjoyed it. Towards the end I hit my head while roughousing and it sorta stopped making sense but that might be my end.

After reading this book, I plan to do a PDC. I had never heard of permaculture before reading this book. This, or further reading would probably be a logical next step if you are new and read this book.

Edit: I forgot to mention this book convinced me to go pooless and and I have been pooless for over 2 month. My hair is so much softer than with shampoo!
 
pollinator
Posts: 504
Location: south-central ME, USA - zone 5a/4b
195
cat dog duck forest garden fungi trees food preservation solar
  • Likes 16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Figure I'll drop this info here. I ordered 24 books on a "freaky cheap" discount back in April and sold them at my farm stand - spent $54 on the books and charged $2/per. Every one of them sold, even the two we tried to hold on to for our own use (that much demand for these!). Total end cost to me was $6 and I believe we've infected at least 60 minds over the course of this growing season.

If I charged more, this would not have been possible, but a cheap book at the farm stand will sell like hotcakes.

If you see my stamp on the inside cover, thank Paul, Shawn and the rich benefactor for the help! Was a very cool experience  
stamp.png
[Thumbnail for stamp.png]
the-stand-stitched.jpg
the-better-world-book-stand-stitched
 
author and steward
Posts: 50204
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tristan Vitali wrote: charged $2/per. Every one of them sold



Neat!  Apples and PIE for you!
 
gardener
Posts: 3836
Location: yakima valley, central washington, pacific northwest zone 6b
712
2
dog forest garden fungi foraging hunting cooking composting toilet medical herbs writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Throwback to before "Building a Better World" book was out there:  Paul Wheaton's 72 Brick Presentation
 
gardener
Posts: 1306
735
8
hugelkultur monies foraging trees composting toilet cooking bike solar wood heat rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thought I'd share this happy little tidbit.  Back when the book came out I did inspire my local library book discussion group to get enough copies to make what the district library system calls a "book club in a bag".  This is essentially a dozen or so copies with a sign up/sign out sheet and sample discussion questions all gathered together in a bag that the various library discussion groups around the county can check out.  

I always thought each library had it's own book discussion group and this book club in a bag service was just something the librarians could check out.  Tonight while I was searching for other things on the library website I discovered it's actually open to anyone in the region doing book discussions.  Being curious I looked up the availability of "Building a Better World in you Backyard".  It is reserved by various groups for the next 3 months.  It is Dec. 13, 2022 as I'm typing this and the earliest it could be checked out is March 27, 2023!  My guess is that when the various groups start planning for what they'll read in the spring it will get fully reserved again.  

I think it's not only a great book for discussions, being a fun quick read, but also ripe with subjects to talk about, but I suspect the title is also something that just calls out to those selecting books for their groups.  If anyone here wants to try getting a similar thing set up with your library or book group I offer up this set of discussion questions I put together for my group.  (It was something I promised them I'd do if they got the book.)  Feel free to copy, share, and use them, or of course make up  your own.
 
gardener
Posts: 999
Location: Málaga, Spain
350
home care personal care forest garden urban food preservation cooking
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi,
is there a version in Spanish? If there isn't, would you be interested in a translation?
Nowadays it is very easy to just use a translator, but I find that I have to make up a sentence or two every now and then.
Beware that the title in Spanish is quite long:
"Construyendo un mundo mejor en tu patio trasero: en vez de enfadarte con los tipos malos."
 
pollinator
Posts: 149
Location: Pennsylvania, USA
56
2
homeschooling kids homestead
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just finished reading the eBook version of this. 10/10 acorns - As an introduction to permaculture, it is wonderful. I plan on getting a package of books to sell at the farmgate stand this year - great idea on that one! It was generally concise and free-flowing, easy to read, and contained enough humor and earnest discussion to be well balanced. Great job all around.

I had previously read the Thorns draft, and there was a lot of repetition and crossover. Now that I've read this, Thorns feels more like it could be narrowed into a much more focused and detailed book on community and have most of the practical side of permactulture taken out. Billed as a follow-up to Better World, you could then go into deeper dives on the other chapters as well making each their own small free-flowing easy read book. Probably a biased opinion since I already subscribe to the thinking, but I would enjoy reading more of these!
 
pollinator
Posts: 2168
Location: Massachusetts, 5a, flat 4 acres; 40" year-round fairly even
292
4
kids purity trees urban writing
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Abraham Palma wrote:Hi,
is there a version in Spanish? If there isn't, would you be interested in a translation?
Nowadays it is very easy to just use a translator, but I find that I have to make up a sentence or two every now and then.
Beware that the title in Spanish is quite long:
"Construyendo un mundo mejor en tu patio trasero: en vez de enfadarte con los tipos malos."

Good, now I know how to be angry at bad guys in Spanish and English!  

I second this idea, and afterwards the other most populous languages in cold climate, high footprint regions (Mandarin and maybe Russian, French, German).  
 
paul wheaton
author and steward
Posts: 50204
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 290
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I believe that if this book is read by 100 million people, several global problems will be solved.


please click on the thumbs up for this post if you agree with this.


 
gardener
Posts: 1237
Location: Tennessee
816
homeschooling kids urban books writing homestead
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Currently I am reading "Rebuilding the Foodshed" (Philip Ackermen-Leist) and every chapter I keep thinking, I feel like I read this somewhere before! From smart use of "biosolids" to managing carbon to getting truly nutritious, clean food onto community plates...this is all in BBW. And BBW is in a more user-friendly format, with really great illustrations, and is smaller, so I can give it away to more people than I could "Foodshed".  And I do!
 
master gardener
Posts: 3171
Location: Upstate NY, Zone 5, 43 inch Avg. Rainfall
1217
monies home care dog fungi trees chicken food preservation cooking building composting homestead
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just ordered this book from Amazon. Can't wait to read it.
 
gardener
Posts: 1302
484
12
homeschooling hugelkultur trees medical herbs sheep horse homestead
  • Likes 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I got a case when you did the kickstarter for this book.  It was one of the backer levels.  

I am down to my last couple books.  


It looks like you are going to launch your 14th kickstarter pretty soon.  

Maybe you could include few or a case of "Build a Better World" books at some of the higher backer levels.    

There would be shipping, but that might be ok.  It would get your book in front of people who have not seen it before.  
 
gardener
Posts: 1233
359
7
trees wofati rocket stoves
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

paul wheaton wrote:I believe that if this book is read by 100 million people, several global problems will be solved.
please click on the thumbs up for this post if you agree with this.



While I clicked the thumbs-up for this, I think it would be more accurate if instead of "will be solved", it was "could be solved", because just getting people to read the info and be more aware doesn't mean the problem will be solved. It would certainly get more people asking why it isn't being solved, but IMO it would also get those who profit from the status quo to resist changes. Still a massive net-positive step, as it would initiate at least the desire for change.
 
pollinator
Posts: 561
Location: https://youtube.com/@healthygreenbrave?si=0CFOwxe0mLCIBflU
257
3
kids foraging rabbit fiber arts medical herbs bee
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

paul wheaton wrote:I believe that if this book is read by 100 million people, several global problems will be solved.



This belief is predicated upon the assumption that, if someone reads the book and learns what to do.... that they will actually change their lives.
 
pollinator
Posts: 469
123
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It’s also assuming those people are in a position to be influential. The global problems we face are the result of corporate greed to a large extent. That’s fueled by consumerism and even if a million people change their lives in dramatic ways, will they influence others to do so, or simply be regarded as ‘fringe weirdos? These ideas really need to strike a nerve in people who can in turn change things in a way that affects millions of other people. Because unfortunately, if a million people switch to a clothesline, another million will say well, great! Now my polluting won’t matter as much! I’m getting a bigger car!! Sort of like the carbon offset game companies play.
 
paul wheaton
author and steward
Posts: 50204
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Samantha Lewis wrote:I got a case when you did the kickstarter for this book.  It was one of the backer levels.  

I am down to my last couple books.  


It looks like you are going to launch your 14th kickstarter pretty soon.  

Maybe you could include few or a case of "Build a Better World" books at some of the higher backer levels.    

There would be shipping, but that might be ok.  It would get your book in front of people who have not seen it before.  



First, apples and PIE for "K11".

I guess I am trying to figure out my feels.  I think the book will make a difference, but only when it gets into more brains - like thousands a day levels.  And when I go out and put a LOT of effort into promoting the book, it seems like 100 hours of effort leads to 100 more books.  Currently my brain is calculating world domination and saying "that won't lead to world domination."  Then there are "what if" thoughts, but years of trying those have borne zero fruit.  So then my brain says "what can you do that you CAN do that MIGHT work?" and the answer is "make more stuff. more movies. more books. more youtube videos. like i always have. and maybe, someday, one of those things will go viral."

My massive plot that seems to be not working:   make the purchase of a dozen books freaky cheap.  People will buy them by the dozen and hand them out.  1 or 2 of the people receiving one will buy a dozen ...   etc.  But if my book were as good as I think it is (and i confess to a freaky bias here) then that WOULD work.  ....   therefore ... maybe I need to come to grips with the idea that mt arrogance far exceeds the reality of this book.  It's just a so-so book and I should let it go.  It is doing the best that it can - it just isn't good enough to get more traction.

And then I got the idea for this

I believe that if this book is read by 100 million people, several global problems will be solved.

please click on the thumbs up for this post if you agree with this.



Hmmmm ....   so I am not alone in thinking that this book can make a real difference.  And not only "not alone" but, THAT is a lot of thumbs up!

Cannot add stuff to this kickstarter where shipping would be involved.  It gets weird.  
 
paul wheaton
author and steward
Posts: 50204
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mark Brunnr wrote:

paul wheaton wrote:I believe that if this book is read by 100 million people, several global problems will be solved.
please click on the thumbs up for this post if you agree with this.



While I clicked the thumbs-up for this, I think it would be more accurate if instead of "will be solved", it was "could be solved", because just getting people to read the info and be more aware doesn't mean the problem will be solved. It would certainly get more people asking why it isn't being solved, but IMO it would also get those who profit from the status quo to resist changes. Still a massive net-positive step, as it would initiate at least the desire for change.



I think that if 100 million people had this information in their head, at least the conversations that happen will be a thousand times more constructive.  Right now all the conversations are "blame others".  And, if 100 million read it, then my guess is that more than half will change some small thing.  And about 10% will make some big changes.
 
paul wheaton
author and steward
Posts: 50204
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Rebekah Harmon wrote:

paul wheaton wrote:I believe that if this book is read by 100 million people, several global problems will be solved.



This belief is predicated upon the assumption that, if someone reads the book and learns what to do.... that they will actually change their lives.



My guess is that more than half will try some small changes.  

But more importantly, will we see new books (better books?), new movies, new ...  STUFF that is solution based rather than "we're all fucked now" based.  

 
paul wheaton
author and steward
Posts: 50204
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Julie Reed wrote:It’s also assuming those people are in a position to be influential. The global problems we face are the result of corporate greed to a large extent. That’s fueled by consumerism and even if a million people change their lives in dramatic ways, will they influence others to do so, or simply be regarded as ‘fringe weirdos? These ideas really need to strike a nerve in people who can in turn change things in a way that affects millions of other people. Because unfortunately, if a million people switch to a clothesline, another million will say well, great! Now my polluting won’t matter as much! I’m getting a bigger car!! Sort of like the carbon offset game companies play.



My response fits perfectly in this image



If a million people switch to a clothesline, there will be people that will waste more.  But there will be other people that will also want a clothesline.  

There are a million reasons to let everything go to shit.  And there are some good reasons to get a clothesline.  Plant a garden. Go pooless.  Learn about rocket mass heaters.

Most of all: 100 million people choosing to take their money away from bad guys will affect amazing change.
 
pollinator
Posts: 192
Location: west Texas (Odessa/Midland)
47
2
cattle dog foraging trees rabbit tiny house books chicken pig writing homestead
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

paul wheaton wrote:

Mark Brunnr wrote:

paul wheaton wrote:I believe that if this book is read by 100 million people, several global problems will be solved.
please click on the thumbs up for this post if you agree with this.



While I clicked the thumbs-up for this, I think it would be more accurate if instead of "will be solved", it was "could be solved", because just getting people to read the info and be more aware doesn't mean the problem will be solved. It would certainly get more people asking why it isn't being solved, but IMO it would also get those who profit from the status quo to resist changes. Still a massive net-positive step, as it would initiate at least the desire for change.



I think that if 100 million people had this information in their head, at least the conversations that happen will be a thousand times more constructive.  Right now all the conversations are "blame others".  And, if 100 million read it, then my guess is that more than half will change some small thing.  And about 10% will make some big changes.



THAT was my thought as well.

Many people don't even have a clue where to start or what to do.

Even if they do absolutely nothing but read the book, then maybe when their friend, nephew, cousin's brother in law starts doing something, they will be supportive instead of derisive.

As someone who is not terribly responsive to peer pressure, I have had to learn that most humans are very subject to it. So even that can make a difference.
 
paul wheaton
author and steward
Posts: 50204
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Karen McVause wrote: they will be supportive instead of derisive.



Exactly!
 
pollinator
Posts: 434
Location: Poland, zone 6, CfB
168
12
forest garden fish trees books writing homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It would be very interesting to make a survey across readers community of this book. I mean a serious reseach. To see what impact it has on their thoughts and actions. I wonder if there is a good way to do so, to get statistically significant results. Here on permies our survey sample is skewed towards bigger impact. I have handed over the book to some people and places, and the feedback was always from slightly positive to very enthusiastic, however its impact on readers action varies from huge to none. But the seeds are being planted for sure with every single book handed over and with each next reader.
 
Posts: 87
39
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have not read the book, but it's going on my wish list. We're striving to build a better world that includes our front yard...there is more space for us than the backyard (shade tree takes up a good amount of space).
20230630_074421.jpg
A front yard with a hoop house and tall sunflowers
 
Tristan Vitali
pollinator
Posts: 504
Location: south-central ME, USA - zone 5a/4b
195
cat dog duck forest garden fungi trees food preservation solar
  • Likes 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I know that the book sold out at my farmstand at $2 - sold all 24 of them. This was a financial loss of 25 cents per book / $6.

I suspect that they would not have sold at all for $5. It's likely I would still have 12 of the 24 if I was asking $3.

Edit: Note this was last year / 2022 - $2 was also the price of a dozen eggs. Inflation / deflation, by definition, changes the appropriate price point over time.

The book was 100% an impulse buy. People reliably buy our chicken eggs, garlic, green beans and our summer squash. They reliably do not buy "weird" things like duck eggs, live meat birds, kholrabi or medicinal herbs. The book was not weird. People bought it reliably. Pricing just needed to be right.

My thinking is that people are "into" solutions, curious about thoughts of others that may have more knowledge than them and value this sort of thing at a particular price point / wallet hit. They are, however, tired of being preached to, weary of the AGW song and sickened by being blamed for all the wrongs done in their name. The book title itself helps dispel some of the angst a customer / potential reader would feel about the subject matter which in turn piques their curiosity about the content, but they would not go seeking the book out nor would they spend "real money" on it. That would be taking a chance they'd waste money on "the same old".

It's also likely I would still have 12 of the 24 if I gave them away free. Free implies junk. It implies preaching.

Infecting 100 million brains with the book would require convincing 100 million brains that reading the book is not going to be a significant loss of time OR money.

That's my 25 cents on the matter
 
gardener
Posts: 1969
Location: Gulgong, NSW, Australia (Cold Zone 9B, Hot Zone 6) UTC +10
904
6
hugelkultur fungi chicken earthworks wofati food preservation cooking bee building solar rocket stoves
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Patrick W Kelly wrote:I have not read the book, but it's going on my wish list. We're striving to build a better world that includes our front yard...there is more space for us than the backyard (shade tree takes up a good amount of space).


Congratulations Patrick.  Just imagine how many food miles we could save if each of us had your foresight; and how much healthier we would be eating our own fresh fruit and vegetables?
Send me a PM with a mailing address and I will ensure that you get a copy of Building a better world in your own Back Yard with my compliments to celebrate your work in the front garden.  The proviso is that when you no longer have a need for it, you pass it on to someone else or put it in your local library.  I have an e-book copy as well as a reference.
Again, congratulations and well done
Paul from down under

 
master steward
Posts: 11547
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6453
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

paul wheaton wrote:

Karen McVause wrote: they will be supportive instead of derisive.

Exactly!


Patrick W Kelly:

We're striving to build a better world that includes our front yard...there is more space for us than the backyard



Exactly squared! About 30 years ago when I lived in Ontario Suburbia, I planted veggies in the front garden. Several of the neighbors were quite perturbed and borderline derisive. To quote one of them - "Leave growing food to the farmers!"

It's time to "reinvent the kitchen garden" - fresh food, right outside the door (even if it's just a balcony door), and have that seen as the new normal.

So I agree that simply having neighbors being supportive of efforts to help Planet Earth is a critical part of the equation. I'm not convinced that will encourage others to be "more wasteful" even if it doesn't encourage them to be less.
 
Posts: 11
5
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Patrick W Kelly wrote:I have not read the book, but it's going on my wish list. We're striving to build a better world that includes our front yard...there is more space for us than the backyard (shade tree takes up a good amount of space).



How good is front yard gardening though! We've done the same, basically because our back yard is a decent size and I didn't know where to start when we bought the place, so I started in our front yard instead. Best thing I could have done. I know nearly everyone in our neighbourhood, plus the extra dog walkers. So not only are we actually growing some food (whatever the kids don't pick before it ripens 😆) I've also significantly reduced our isolation, which as a homeschooling mum in a ND family is super important to me. This way we get to grow food and socialise without the stress of leaving the house, winning!

I loved this book and am due for a reread I think. It sparked a lot of conversations with my husband about achievable small steps we can take when everything feels too much.
 
Posts: 7
2
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I stopped doing any business with Amazon a number of years ago for a number of reasons. How else can I get this book?
 
master steward
Posts: 6900
Location: Isle of Skye, Scotland. Nearly 70 inches rain a year
3347
4
transportation dog forest garden foraging trees books food preservation woodworking wood heat rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Pam - You can also buy the better world book direct from Paul here on Permies
 
Posts: 20
Location: Seattle, WA
14
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tristan Vitali wrote: I ordered 24 books on a "freaky cheap" discount back in April and sold them at my farm stand - spent $54 on the books and charged $2/per.


I ordered 24 books on that deal as well, after buying extra copies for my grown kids. I gave a few to friends but mostly put them in all the little library boxes around my neighborhood. I put in a new copy whenever I stopped on my bike and saw that someone took the one that was there. I like to think that this is on a continuum. Some people might never crack open the book but just read the title and could still benefit from the thought that there are ways that individuals can build a better world. Others will read it completely and try some or all of the ideas, but it is so easy to just skip to a page or two that covers an idea you are interested in. Once someone takes a step in the right direction, it can lead to more steps. The only change I would have liked to see, would be lighter versions of these that someone who is not ready to commit to going "pooless" or installing a mass rocket heater in their rental apartment, could take. The Pareto principle states that for many outcomes, roughly 80% of consequences come from 20% of causes, or stated another way, in low risk situations, 80% of the benefits can be had for 20% of the costs. While this is not recommended for airplane safety or heart surgery, someone who is concerned about going pooless, could start by cutting back the amounts of cleaners, soaps, shampoos and detergents by half and if that still works cut in half again until they are at the lowest amount that still gives the desired result. The person in the rental apartment, could find ways of cutting the heat bill and creating greater efficiency. Someone who takes a step in this direction, may later try going pooless, when given the opportunity to work from home for 6 weeks (e.g. pandemic) or build a RMH in the home they buy or build themselves.
 
Posts: 3
2
2
homeschooling hugelkultur composting toilet
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just finished reading this AWESOME book! I had somehow heard of the title just after we moved to Florida in late 2019, and although I didn’t even know it was a book, it perfectly described my attitude. Bought it after backing the Low Tech Labs Kickstarter movie. Thanks for putting all these concepts into such accessible and well-written words.
 
paul wheaton
author and steward
Posts: 50204
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

JoAnn Johnson wrote:Just finished reading this AWESOME book! I had somehow heard of the title just after we moved to Florida in late 2019, and although I didn’t even know it was a book, it perfectly described my attitude. Bought it after backing the Low Tech Labs Kickstarter movie. Thanks for putting all these concepts into such accessible and well-written words.



Perhaps you would like to say some words at goodreads?  https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/52107903

 
Posts: 255
Location: Iqaluit, Nunavut zone 0 / Mont Sainte-Marie, QC zone 4a
52
2
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
10/10

I confess I haven't "read" this book: I have listened to it 2.5 times
over the last 24 hours
That's almost every waking hour!

I love it

And thank you Paul for confirming I was right all along
for not ditching my rough service incandescent bulbs!
I like being told I am right: it doesn't happen nearly enough haha

So if you haven't gotten around to reading this yet, you could buy
the audiobook
and listen to it while you are canning stuff you hurriedly stuffed in the freezer
 
This tiny ad helped me apply for a passport. Denied.
We need your help - Permies server fundraiser
https://permies.com/wiki/260600/Permies-server-fundraiser
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic