• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Miles Flansburg
garden masters:
  • Dan Boone
  • Dave Burton
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Shawn Klassen-Koop
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Barkley
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wanted to make this thread to help me keep track of and document growing buckwheat.

Hopefully it will be helpful to others also!
COMMENTS:
 
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The buckwheat seeds germinated easily and quickly from direct sowing, by scattering the seeds on the ground and lightly mixing with the soil and a small amount of mulch and walking on them.

They were planted right before a few days of rain which watered them in well.

They are growing fast!
20190503_192731.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190503_192731.jpg]
Baby buckwheat!
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I really like how buckwheat looks, and it grows so fast too!

Rabbits (I think were the culprits) apparently really like it too. They got into my garden and feasted on my new buckwheat plants that were sprouting, now the new ones are headless buckwheat sprouts.

Thankfully the rabbits didn't find this first batch.
20190519_163031.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190519_163031.jpg]
Buckwheat
 
pollinator
Posts: 578
Location: Western Washington
151
bee duck forest garden homestead personal care rabbit
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Buckwheat is fantastic for pollinating insects, as I'm sure many know. I've heard of people eating the greens too but some say it's toxic, especially raw (it seems). Do you plan on eating the grain?

Around here we sow buckwheat so that it blooms in the fall, when bloom is short in our region
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, I plan on using the seeds to make grain.

I'm thinking that I may can get two crops of it this year and maybe even three!

Like you mentioned, I'm glad it'll be blooming in late summer and early fall to provide additional food for pollinators.
 
James Landreth
pollinator
Posts: 578
Location: Western Washington
151
bee duck forest garden homestead personal care rabbit
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Steve Thorn wrote:Yes, I plan on using the seeds to make grain.

I'm thinking that I may can get two crops of it this year and maybe even three!

Like you mentioned, I'm glad it'll be blooming in late summer and early fall to provide additional food for pollinators.




Hi Steve,

Have you grown buckwheat before? The plants you have now should bloom soon (they always bloom sooner than I'm ready for!). If you want to have an additional crop in the fall you can plant in summer
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I meant to add that the second or third crop might be blooming during that time, yeah that would be some long lasting buckwheat.

I can actually see the flower buds forming right now, so it shouldn't be too long before they are ready!
 
gardener
Posts: 1130
Location: mountains of Tennessee
342
bee cattle chicken homestead
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Steve, your weather is similar to mine. Buckwheat grows here late March - early Oct. The earliest batch of this year is just now starting to be ready to harvest.

I normally just throw the seeds around in random places with poor soil. Then harvest foot tall plants a couple months later. This year I used some as ground cover in really good soil & it is almost chest high. This stuff is great. It feeds bees, chickens, humans, & the soil.


buckwheat.jpg
[Thumbnail for buckwheat.jpg]
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Those look great Mike!

Im going to use it very widely as a cover crop too once I save up some more seeds!

Yes, it's such a great plant with lots of great uses!
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Should have have some buckwheat flowers soon!
20190519_163122.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190519_163122.jpg]
Buckwheat flower bud!
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The buckwheat is flowering!
20190527_114858.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190527_114858.jpg]
Buckwheat flowers! :)
 
pollinator
Posts: 170
58
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Steve, your buckeheat looks good. It will probably self seed from now on. It does here in zone 5. And the plants seem to get bigger every year. I planted it as a cover crop once and it has never left. It comes up especially around bird baths. I recently learned that it is a dynamic accumulator especially of calcium and gain neutralize acid soil. It is a good tea for high blood pressure.
 
gardener
Posts: 538
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
116
bee bike chicken dog duck fiber arts food preservation cooking pig solar ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Such a beautiful pic, Steve!
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Dan, great info, love the way it can self seed!
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Mandy, I really like the way the flowers look, some have pink flowers, and the pollinators love them too!
 
Posts: 30
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
6
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I want to order some buckwheat seeds, and I see that there is an annual buckwheat and a perennial one. Which one should I get? I'm in Zone 8b, North Georgia, and I have a wooded area I'm clearing with acid soil. I read somewhere that buckwheat helps neutralize acid soil, so that (and chicken feed) is why I want to grow it.

 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Diane, I've never grown the perennial buckwheat.

Here's an older thread talking about it a little though.

https://permies.com/t/8348/Wanted-Perennial-Buckwheat-Fagopyrum-dibotrys

I've really enjoyed the annual buckwheat so far, so I'll probably be sticking with that. Let me know how the perennial buckwheat is if you try it!
 
Diane Kistner
Posts: 30
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
6
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Steve Thorn wrote:Diane, I've never grown the perennial buckwheat.

Here's an older thread talking about it a little though.

https://permies.com/t/8348/Wanted-Perennial-Buckwheat-Fagopyrum-dibotrys

I've really enjoyed the annual buckwheat so far, so I'll probably be sticking with that. Let me know how the perennial buckwheat is if you try it!



Thanks, Steve. I'll check that out, but if annual is fine, that's probably what I'll go with. Or maybe I'll try both!

On second thought, after reading that link, I think I'll stick with the annual buckwheat. I know just the place(s) I'm going to put it.
 
pollinator
Posts: 659
Location: 6a
153
dog forest garden hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Steve, does buckwheat taste better than Quinoa?
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 747
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
194
bee fish food preservation forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking trees
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I haven't tasted it yet actually Scott. The type I've planted is supposed to be sweet though, and I'll hopefully be able to let you know for sure soon!
 
Scott Foster
pollinator
Posts: 659
Location: 6a
153
dog forest garden hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Steve Thorn wrote:I haven't tasted it yet actually Scott. The type I've planted is supposed to be sweet though, and I'll hopefully be able to let you know for sure soon!



Keep us posted!  
 
Mike Barkley
gardener
Posts: 1130
Location: mountains of Tennessee
342
bee cattle chicken homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Buckwheat has a bit of a nutty flavor. Similar to pecans according to my taste buds.

As far as the annual vs. perennial thing ... the annuals reseed themselves fairly easily if some are not harvested. So my suggestion is to choose any variety that grows well in your area. Full disclosure though. I have no experience with the perennial version.
 
If you open the box, you will find Heisenberg strangling Shrodenger's cat. And waving this tiny ad:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!