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nest badge brainstorming

 
sheriff
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The nest badge is about:

  - converting a house into a home
  - proving to Otis that if he lets you stay in "the other house" that the house will be better for it
          (as opposed to trashed)
  - making certain that good, clean habits are engrained
  - making certain that the knowledge and skills are there to clean anything with less than 1% of the toxicity of conventional cleaning



In an attempt to get the ideas flowing ...


do laundry by hand

Pulley

wash vehicle exterior
  proper cleaning and waxing of glass
clean vehicle interior
  PROPER cleaning of glass

grease hinges

replace carpet with wood flooring (or something else natural)

set up a recycling system

set up a system for dealing with wood ash

move wood ash to the ash barrel

unclog a sink with a zip tool

set up a system for collecting burnables

clean rugs

build experiences with edible cleaners

clean an oily dish with nothing but hot water
  end result is squeaky clean

clean and organize a space

use organic walnut oil to treat at least six pieces of kitchen wood

make a bed to xxx standards

solve a mold problem

install a dehumidifier that will drain into … a greywater drain or other drain

set up a clothes line

set up an eleaborate clothes line

shovel snow
  front porch + library
  around mailbox

create natural curtains
  round wood rods, holders, etc.
  twofer with textiles?

create really good, layered, winter curtain systems

maintenance on furnace

deep cleaning
pull out fridge
pull out oven
pull out washer and dryer

washing machine maintenance

clean windows - inside and out

sand on ice
  prepare sand barrels and buckets in the warm months
  put sand down in the cold months

deep clean fridge interior


Also, shawn said that he thinks there could not be an iron badge for nest.   So what might be five or six things that would fill out an iron badge for nest?  Five or six things where each things might take a full month of full 40 hours weeks?    Maybe there could be "make a house a home - iteratively" where there are ten iterations of improvement.  ??
 
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Not sure if it fits in here and is PEP. Or cooking. Some things i have been working on. 1 led to another, and another to where i came full circle.

Render lard
  Now you have candles, soap making materials, cast iron seasoning. Cooking oil. A lubricant that doesnt go away in rain. Great stuff

Make lye from ash (combine the 2 for soap)

Fyi, all this came about from your rocket stove bb(boil a gallon of water), and what to do with the ash. Very little "heating" needed in my area so this ash thing is new to me.
 
Marshal
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I think the hard thing about Nest is that it is largely an ONGOING thing. If one does not keep doing the same, often-annoying, repetitive tasks, one does not have a good nest.

To me, somoene that earns an iron badge in Nesting, would do all their home maintaince on time. This means the less regulars stuff, like cleaning gutters, sealing window, cleaning chimney,  washing walls, washing windows, emptying generator, cleaning roof, etc. And it also means the daily/weekly stuff, like washing mirrors and floors and counters and sinks and stove tops, and wiping down condensation on windows, and putting away projects/thing when they're done with them, and washing dishes, etc.

I think if someone did that stuff for a year straight, perfectly, as well as the other more one-and-done things like make laundry detergent, make soap, make candles, make organizers, etc, then I think they will have earned an iron badge. When I think of Master Nesters, I think of people who have a clean, well maintained, neat home all the time. Proving this would be hard, but could be done with weekly pictures.


--------------------

For me, I think a sand badge for nesting would have a combination of learning cleaning disciple, as well as maintance, as well as making nifty stuff (things that make your house look nicer/work better, like curtains, reupolstering, shelf making, labeling bins, making organizational systems, coat racks). Maybe:

Sand Badge:

- Make 5 pounds of dry or liquid laundry detergent (20 minutes)
- Install a clothes line and dry a load of laundry on it (30-45 minutes)
- create an organizational system (shelves, cubbies, labling bins, etc) and fill it with the things that need to be organized (1-.5 hours)
- *clean list* fill bottles/jars with these cleaners: baking soda, vinegar, _____. Clean five of the below areas with said cleaners: (1 hour)
     -- Bathroom counter
     -- Kitchen counter
     -- stove top
     -- mirror
     -- toilet
     -- kitchen sink
     -- wood floor
     -- fridge
     -- bathtub
     -- Bathroom floor
     -- tile
     -- clean an oily dish with nothing but hot water-- end result is squeaky clean

- Clean gutters (30 minutes)
- Make a candle from beeswax (30 minutes?)
- Some sort of other semi-yearly maintenance (empty generator, clean chimney, wash exterior walls, oil furniture, other preventive maintenance that I can't recall)


Straw:

- Clean 5 more things from the *clean* list
- Beat rugs
- Render lard (or other used cooking oil) to make soap and make soap
- unclog a sink with a zip tool
- take apart the sink pipe to clean out gunk
- set up a system for collecting burnables
- install a dehumidifier that will drain into … a greywater drain or other drain
- shovel snow
-create natural curtains
 round wood rods, holders, etc. . curtain making in straw textiles?
- Make coat rack[/img] or [url=https://permies.com/t/98655/PEP-BB-roundwood-sand-hook]coat hooks or stool
- Make basket from textiles
- grease hinges
- use organic walnut oil to treat at least six pieces of kitchen wood
- clean at least 50 dishes (cups/plates/sliverware) in the sink, using Paul's water-conservation methods.
 
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paul wheaton wrote:

Also, shawn said that he thinks there could not be an iron badge for nest.   So what might be five or six things that would fill out an iron badge for nest?  Five or six things where each things might take a full month of full 40 hours weeks?    Maybe there could be "make a house a home - iteratively" where there are ten iterations of improvement.  ??



I think building a home might qualify, just in the sheer amount of labor involved. I think stipulations might be needed like no vinyl siding or asphalt shingles. Just tossing an idea out there.
 
paul wheaton
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To me, somoene that earns an iron badge in Nesting, would do all their home maintaince on time.



So this might require a thread with a new post every day.  A bit of a diary.  With three pics a day.   And every day is a pic that shows a clean kitchen.

??
 
paul wheaton
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I think this one is for Otis in a big way. Otis has a second house and there have been people in that house that were slobs (by the standards of Otis).  Otis needs to know that if he lets somebody in that house for no rent, that they are going to care for the house.  

At the same time, I know that when we have events here, there have been some events where the teacher for the event made all the students keep everything clean.   But that's more the exeption.  For other events, we find that we are spending months cleaning up after the event.  

And we have some people come here that refuse to wash their own dishes.  And we have some people that throw garbage on the ground.  And some people that ...   well, you get the idea.  

I guess I'm just thinking that it would be great if for PEP1 events, the place is in better shape than when the event started.

---

Further, I think there are a lot of the most basic nest elements that some people have just never done.  So for the sand badge, they will at least have done it once.  And if they have done it a thousand times, they will now have documentation that they have done it at least once.

 
paul wheaton
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I'm also thinking that most people have never tried to clean a home without toxic gick.   This requires a different approach for this to work.  A different mindset.   Practice, practice, practice.

 
rancher
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Ok I think I have doing a job that should earn a badge for nest. We are snowed in, and our water line is frozen. So I have been melting snow to wash the dishes. Sorry I don't have photos, just my hubby as a witness. This would include shoveling snow into the pots (four pots per washing session) then carrying pots inside to melt over stove, then washing and rinsing. Using correct order for hand washing, glasses first, dishes, and pots and pans last, etc. hand drying, or air drying, putting away.
 
Nicole Alderman
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paul wheaton wrote:

To me, somoene that earns an iron badge in Nesting, would do all their home maintaince on time.



So this might require a thread with a new post every day.  A bit of a diary.  With three pics a day.   And every day is a pic that shows a clean kitchen.

??



Something like that, yes! Maybe something like 300/365 days per year. That way, if someone goes on vacation or horrible life things happen, they can still complete it. I think having a clean house/kitchen 300/365 days proves that someone knows how to clean their house, and has developed the discipline to do so.
 
rancher
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I would think that there should be some element of fixing things that go wrong or break.  Josephine noted that they have a frozen water line and thus are working to melt snow for water.  That's one task, but the other one would be learning to discover where the line itself is frozen and how to thaw it out.  I've had to do this more than once over the years.  Recently I had to trouble shoot a well issue that ended up being a burst bladder in the pressure tank, resulting in short cycling of the well pump.  So I had to learn how to replace the pressure tank and water lines around it.  Other things might be replacing a water heater, fixing a leaky roof, replacing a broken window, etc.  

It seems like it would be hard to specify any one thing for a PEP badge since who can anticipate just what will go wrong, but I feel like taking care of one's nest should involve figuring out how to handle these sorts of things personally rather than always resorting to calling a repair man.
 
Josephine Howland
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David Huang wrote:I would think that there should be some element of fixing things that go wrong or break.  Josephine noted that they have a frozen water line and thus are working to melt snow for water.  That's one task, but the other one would be learning to discover where the line itself is frozen and how to thaw it out.  I've had to do this more than once over the years.  Recently I had to trouble shoot a well issue that ended up being a burst bladder in the pressure tank, resulting in short cycling of the well pump.  So I had to learn how to replace the pressure tank and water lines around it.  Other things might be replacing a water heater, fixing a leaky roof, replacing a broken window, etc.  

It seems like it would be hard to specify any one thing for a PEP badge since who can anticipate just what will go wrong, but I feel like taking care of one's nest should involve figuring out how to handle these sorts of things personally rather than always resorting to calling a repair man.




Yes, my husband has been under the house several times to try and thaw the water lines. We have built a heated pump house and have heat tape on the lines, but somehow (probabbly citters) the plugs were unplugged. We fear that now the lines are frozen underground. The issue stems from the lines being installed improperly by the person pouring our footings and installing our We are thinking that this spring/summer we will need to dig up the whole line and build a heated box around the the whole thing. Right now we have heat tape and two layers of insulation wraped around all exposed line and going a few feet underground. With about 5 feet of snow everywhere, now is not the time to try to rework the system. Also making a better skirting around the house to somewhat critter proof it would be in order. All things made more difficult with two disabled people here.













 
David Huang
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Josephine Howland wrote:

Yes, my husband has been under the house several times to try and thaw the water lines. We have built a heated pump house and have heat tape on the lines, but somehow (probabbly citters) the plugs were unplugged. We fear that now the lines are frozen underground. The issue stems from the lines being installed improperly by the person pouring our footings and installing our We are thinking that this spring/summer we will need to dig up the whole line and build a heated box around the the whole thing. Right now we have heat tape and two layers of insulation wraped around all exposed line and going a few feet underground. With about 5 feet of snow everywhere, now is not the time to try to rework the system. Also making a better skirting around the house to somewhat critter proof it would be in order. All things made more difficult with two disabled people here.




I hear ya!  What fun... or not.  In my case the problem spot was at the well head in the zone between the well and a crappy thin sheet metal shed rusted through in so many areas it was practically fully exposed to the elements.  The ground would freeze in the few feet between the well shaft and the well pump in the shed when it got cold enough.  I have heat tapes on the pipes above ground but not below so if the ground froze hard enough the pipes in it would freeze too and I'd have to chisel away frozen dirt to expose the pipes to better thaw them.  This past year I finally got the time to completely tear down that travesty of a shed and build something real with walls 6 inches thick with insulation.  I also laid down about 3 inches of insulation board across the exterior ground the pipes run under on their way to the shed, and then built the dirt up higher on that.  In effect this should make the pipes act as though they are much deeper into the ground with regards to freezing.  The ground inside the envelope of the shed is now protected from the elements directly and so too should be much less inclined to freeze.  This winter I did have a day or two with temps around -14 F and thus far no problems.  Hopefully I actually fixed this issue.  Frozen pipes really suck!  Good luck with yours!
 
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I would love to earn a badge in nest.  

I understand this is a thread for brainstorming, but is there a way to offer myself as a guinea pig for this?

My house is not always clean and organized, and it’s not always because I don’t have time. I could use a challenge like this to keep me on my toes.

How do I make it happen? Start a thread somewhere and post often with pictures? Where?

Thank you!
 
Marshal
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Hi Liv, there sure is!  Once Paul lays out the levels and BBs (badge bits) for the Nest badge (based on this brainstorming), then we need to create threads for each BB.  You can help with those if you want.  It's more of a computer thing than actually doing nest work at that point.  Then once the BBs are posted, anyone can start to complete them.  Here's one for Making a Sign.  By looking at the links at the top of the post you can see the heirarchy or organization of the BBs and badges.  Later on in that post you can see how Nicole met the requirements and got approved.

So once they're created, the BB posts are the place you can submit photos (or whatever evidence is required) to start getting your badge.  Hopefully that all makes sense...
 
Liv Smith
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Mike, thank you! It does make sense.

I went a got a look at the making a sign thread, nice! Now I want a wood burning kit😱.

In the meantime, I do wanna help with the nest, even if it’s computer work. I’ll see if I can figure out how to help without asking too many questions🤔.
 
Mike Haasl
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Awesome, it's good practice to make the BBs.  You get to do some links and insert a photo or video.  Plus once we finish them, Paul comes through and fixes them anyway so it's low risk

As for getting rolling on them, I think we'll need to just wait until the BBs are officially defined and then you can get cranking on them.  You can PM me with questions as they come up.  Welcome to the team!
 
David Huang
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I'm not sure if this would be best for the nest badge or something else, but it seems to me that learning how to make your own broom would be a good skill, something like the traditional corn broom.  It's something I've thought about for years but never actually went about learning.
 
paul wheaton
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It seems like we need to start off by making a list of 40 things that can be done in, say, ten to thirty minutes each.   And then we give a name to that list.   In the sand badge we will say that you must complete ten of those things.   And then in the straw badge we can say something like you have to complete 30 of those things and repeats are allowed.

So lets make that list.  

On top of that, are there three or four things that we think are a MUST for the sand badge?
 
Liv Smith
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paul wheaton wrote:

On top of that, are there three or four things that we think are a MUST for the sand badge?



These things could be among the must have’s:

    - Clean dishes with a very mild detergent or no detergent at all

      - do laundry with homemade detergent or soap, or if it’s store bought to be a very gentle one

        - clean other surfaces/fridge/windows etc with non offensive cleaners like baking soda, vinegar, castille soap, borax and so on

    Not sure if this could be a must for the sand badge, maybe a higher badge, but a grey water system of some sort?


 
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For the nest badge, would it include tasks such as: (?)

A) cleaning a toilet with a pumice stone so you can get the stains out without toxins (also the toilet could probably be cleaned, inside and out, so you can tell)

B) knowing how to take knobs off of sinks and showers to either replace them or to clean the gunk out from under them.

C) unclogging a sink (being able to take out the plunger if needed and snake or otherwise clean out any gunk naturally
(Edit- this one was already on the list! Sorry)

D) being able to find a stud in the wall (ear to a cup? Strong magnet?)

E) repairing drywall (if you have drywall) and repairing damaged wood trim or gouges in walls, railings, trim

D) removing and cleaning light fixtures which are not free-standing. This may include learning how to find the numbers on light bulbs to be able to replace "strange" lights)

E) removing damaged caulk (for instance, kitchens and bathrooms) and replacing it, and/or cleaning really icky looking caulk without using toxic gick

(Or are things like drywall and caulk too icky for this list? I could see it go either way, since if you come to an existing home with drywall or caulk that needs repair, it might not make sense to replace it.)

F) cleaning and re-sealing grout on tile (how can tile be sealed in a natural way?)

G) painting an interior room, without making a giant mess, and it looks nice and not streaky when done

H) replacing the electrical cover plates, smoke detectors, door stops, etc other tiny fixtures found in many houses

I) repairing small cracks in rock or cement walls or foundations

J) repairing driveway potholes in gravel / dirt / paved driveways

K) installing visible house numbers on the exterior of a property (both for the sake of being found by new friends but also to be found by emergency vehicles)

L) identifying and repairing small problems with roofs, including seals around vents, etc.

M) replacing or installing screens on windows, perhaps doors?

N) replacing a door and adjusting it so that it closes "nicely"

O) perhaps oiling wood furniture- hinges? What else around the house needs regular oiling? (Edit- this one was already on the list! Sorry)

P) removing moss or other "slick" from outdoor walkways to make them safer. is pressure washing a good thing, or a bad thing? (Is there a human powered pressure washer?) in whatever way is good

Q) removing moss from roofs without damaging them (if needed for your roof)

R) cleaning out gutters and repairing leaky or broken ones, including the drain area leading away from the house

S) changing locks and/or door handles, cabinet handles and closures, window hardware

T) is replacing a window too big of a job for a nest item?

U) is refinishing a wooden floor too big?

V) installing a standard mailbox, let's just say it might have been accidentally disappeared by a passing car...

W) repairing a wooden or wire fence

X) installing a new ceiling fan or lighting, including knowing how to use the fuze box to turn off electricity first. Perhaps do testing and then label all the fuses properly?

Y) perhaps do a deep clean on a fridge, removing all drawers and other parts that come out, defrosting the freezer safely (Edit- this one was already on the list! Sorry)

Z) clean exterior siding / paint Etc of a home without damaging it

Aa) cleaning out a chimney if it needs it (Edit- this one was already on the list! Sorry)

Bb) cleaning out an oven without using gick

Cc) unclog a toilet (is this too basic?)

Which items might be a good example of a nest task? Which items would not? What items did I miss? Am I totally off- base? I'm hoping it's helpful to have more brainstormed items :)
 
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Set up a space for meals outdoors.   Outdoor furniture and tables and stuff.
 
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I think managing possesions is pretty important for nesting. Zero waste is good, but also managing things that are not waste—keeping them clean and organized, but also knowing how to sell/give something away in a manner that ensures it is well utilized (it is shockingly much easier to acquire things in the US today than to get rid of them!), where/how to donate vs. recycle so that donations don’t end up in a landfill or polluting some harbor in the third world or whatever. “Clutter” is subjective, but some effort toward decluttering is probably in order for most people; if fact, a complete and thorough decluttering could verge on an iron badge for some people! Demonstrating knowledge of proper storage of linens and clothing (which sweaters are deformed by hanging them, storing clothes and linens so that they don’t get eaten by moths, polishing and protecting boots/shoes, etc.). Washing clothes so as to prolong their life—hanging to dry of course, washing/drying inside out to prevent wear and fading to right side, zippers/buttons fastened when being agitated with other clothes, perhaps washing delicates in protective mesh bags, etc.). Home economics, household budgeting...
 
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Hmmm, this is a tough one. I'm not much of a nester, as I've been a bit of a gypsy most of my life.

As we're trying to get all of the Sand Badge BBs done for Paul and Shawn's Kickstarter, let's focus on that.

I like the idea of learning basic cleaning skills, using non-toxic, homemade cleaning supplies.

So would gathering and making those cleaning supplies be a BB?

And then other BBs could build on that?
• deep clean of kitchen
• deep clean of bathroom
• etc.

Organizational and de-cluttering aspects are also a good base to build off of, I think:
• get rid of 5 things in the kitchen that you never use. (Recycle, repurpose, give away, etc. Not the landfill.)
• get rid of 5 things in your bedroom
• get rid of 5 things in your shop/garage/craft room
• etc.

What else would be good for the Sand Badge level?
 
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Jennifer Richardson wrote:I think managing possesions is pretty important for nesting. Zero waste is good, but also managing things that are not waste—keeping them clean and organized, but also knowing how to sell/give something away in a manner that ensures it is well utilized (it is shockingly much easier to acquire things in the US today than to get rid of them!), where/how to donate vs. recycle so that donations don’t end up in a landfill or polluting some harbor in the third world or whatever....



I'm tagging and preparing my kids' outgrown clothes for a large local consignment sale.  The sale is twice a year to reflect the different seasons, and I use it as an opportunity to sort our clothing.  I price things very reasonably so they will sell to others who can make use of them.  I also shop these kinds of sales first.  Doing both supports the local community financially.  We still live in a small city (for my husband's job) and our community has a lot of poverty so there are plenty of families who rely on these sales to clothe their kids.  And it's a very Permie kind of thing because it keeps our house organized and is good for the earth.
 
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Okay, it took several rounds with several people and lots of rehashing and rehashing and rehashing ...   but we now have the official sand badge for nest complete:

https://permies.com/wiki/108334/PEP-Badge-Nest

All further brainstorming and discussion will take place there, so I'm locking this thread.
 
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