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recommendations for Fig cultivars Zone 7B

 
pollinator
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Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
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Anyone have any recommendations for fig varieties that taste great off the tree? (pick and eat)

I live in North Alabama and have a couple LSU purple figs that die back every year, so I only get a small number of fruit if any at all.  

It is very humid here so a closed eye variety is recommended.

I would like to keep the fig in a bush form so it is easy to harvest and maintain.  Is another variety needed for pollination?

I want to keep expanding what I am growing so I can get fruit throughout the year.
 
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In the mid-Atlantic we rented a cabin on a plot that had many giant fig trees, both the green and purple types, that grew to 14 foot high with prolific production of fruit. Other than the colors, no idea of the specific cultivar, but knowing they were planted prior to the sixties could indicate a traditional type. When lady who rented to us died and the property was sold to the County as a park, we were told to help ourselves to any domestic plantings in the gardens, so I hacked three fig trees out of the gravel roadside where they had established (quite a task) and planted them at the house we purchased. Hoping for a variety we only got the green type. Over the 25 years since we yearly get tremendous production of figs during the season. Only once a few years ago did we experience low enough temperatures that killed back our figs, requiring they be cut back to the ground (gave away all the fig wood).

I was unfamiliar with the closed eye variety, even though we live in the humid Mid-Atlantic (where our figs our as opposed to our farm up north) it is a battle to beat the ants, bees and birds to our share, they ripen so quickly.
 
gardener
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Brown Turkey, Celeste, Black Mission, and Green Ischia are some of my favorites for eating from the tree.
Just about all edible figs are tasty fresh picked though, just make sure they are ripe.

We are growing brown turkey and celeste currently and are making space for some black mission trees. (Wolf doesn't care much for the Green Ischia, so we won't be adding it to our orchard)

All the above fig trees will do very well in your area Dennis.

Don't worry about pollination unless you want to grow trees from seed. Fig trees are an internal flower and there is a single species of wasp that is the pollinator for all Fig trees.
The fruits we love to grow and eat are rarely pollinated and for eating purposes you don't want pollination to occur.

Redhawk
 
Dennis Bangham
pollinator
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Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
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Thanks Dr.Redhawk.  I know Celeste and Brown Turkey are prevalent in the local stores.  I can keep an eye out for Black MIssion.  I will trust the good taste of Wolf and will hold off on Green Ischia.
 
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Dennis,
I think Han Park grows some of the LSU Purples from cuttings each year.  My experience from a few years back when we got a late freeze was that Celeste was the only variety that didn't freeze back to the ground.  I have a neighbor that has a tree that bears heavily, don't know the variety, but I'm thinking about asking to take cuttings.  The ones he gave me tasted great.  Maybe it has adapted to our local environment here in north Alabama.
Mike
 
Dennis Bangham
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Hey Mike,
Yeah I have a couple LSU purple that die back every winter. I did manage to get one fruit and it did taste good. Right now they are both 6 inches tall (again).  
Would love to get a cutting of your neighbors if you can get a spare. I have room for maybe two in the area I am thinking of but if I get rid of a crape myrtle (too much shade) I may have room for more. I have my misting bench up and running again.
 
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Celeste does well in central NC. (7b some years, 8a others...) I have one that got knocked back when it was a couple of years old by several nights in a row of single digits, but it has come back strong.  Lows in the upper teens are pretty common here and those don't seem to bother it.  I am interested to see how it handles the single digits now that it is getting older and fairly large. Maybe it is six years old now and fruiting consistently, so hopefully it's a survivor!
 
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You might want to check into the Chicago Cold Hardy variety. Those supposedly do better in winter. I successfully grew Brown Turkey, Kadota, & TX Everbearing in TX but none have survived winter in TN. Have some Chicago Cold Hardy's coming to try this year.

I found that picking the ripe fruit daily & knocking the over ripe buggy ones to the ground helps achieve a good harvest.

 
pollinator
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Violette de Bourdox / Neggrone (same fig allegedly) are some that are supposed to be...

1) Easy to find/affordable
2) Resistant to many fig diseases
3) More humidity resistant
4) Heavy producers and a double crop type as well
5) Dwarf in size usually reaching about 8' tall x 6' wide if left to grow natural form allegedly
6) MOST importantly, these are known to blow the flavor profiles of most figs out of the water! Not quite on the level of a Black Maderia but close with more fruit once the tree gets bigger.

These are supposed to be of an intense berry flavor once the tree matures after a few years.



 
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I had zero fig luck in zone 7 until I put my fig bush (Celeste?) between a rock wall and concrete drive.  I went to the local nursery after a particularly hard winter and picked out the ones that looked the best.   It's 10+ feet tall, and produced a quart or two this year.  They seem to come on at a slow steady pace after midsummer.
 
Marty Mitchell
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There is a guy just down the road from me (YouTube) that loves his Lattarula and I-258 figs as well. He is zone 8a though and in containers. High humidity here on the NC coast. Smith is supposed to be tight eyed and from LA.

https://justfruitsandexotics.com/product/lattarula-italian-honey-fig-tree/

I highly recommend that when putting figs into the ground that they need some bark built up first. For instance I just ordered 3 more in the mail and they are newish starts that have almost no bark. I made the mistake in the past to plant in the Fall since it is a great time for most trees. The new figs are now little plants upsized in the shallow/rectangle 5g pots(ok storage containers since they were only $4).

I put in some good fish based organic fertilizer that has beneficial fungi occupants in there. They are putting on heavy growth already after just two weeks in a protected spot. Going inside garage for the Winter( after dormant) and getting planted outside in late Spring after soils reach above 70F. When planting I will give more fertiliser early in the year and that is it... well maybe some more mid Summer. Pinch prune the tips mid Summer to stop outward growth and promote side branching. Slowing things down will put on more fruit later as well as bark to survive the first Winter. Be sure to get something on its own root stock so it can come back if needed... which figs will do. Raising the figs a bit to promote hotter soil in the Summer does no hurt and only improves the flavor and plant vigor.
 
Marty Mitchell
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Here is a good vid on the VDB (Violette De Boudreaux). I am excited about this fig!

The dude in the vid has many variants of this fig and grows in containers. Lives in 7A in Philadelphia.

 
pollinator
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Also remember that the colour of the fig skin and flesh doesn’t mean it means it’ll have a particular taste. There are hundreds of cultivars of figs, which some people unofficially classify by flavour as sugary, honey-like, berry-like (especially strawberry jam), and other. The berry-flavoured ones seem widely regarded as the very best flavoured.
 
pollinator
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My experience with figs in central VA- they die back if you get a hard winter, cultivar independent. The rest seems more to be about how likely they are to fruit after regrowth.

Protection helps. My protected figs after a mild winter put out hundreds of figs after three years, the unprotected ones maybe 1/4.

VdB has been a dud here, even protected. It does not seem to produce after dying back in this climate. I have gotten one fig in three years. Brown Turkey has been fine, I have one unnamed (probably Celeste) that has been outstanding. The flavor of Brown Turkey is more than adequate for me.

The LSU gold and purple are two years old and have not set fruit. They died even in a mild winter back to the ground. I am thinking of pruning them to try to thicken the primary stems to get them to harden off better but I am not sure when to do it. Maybe Dr Redhawk has some guidance.

I have shifted from getting a whole bunch of cool named cultivars to just going for numbers, since they tend to produce a handful of figs after a bad winter.

The biggest thing here has been to amend HEAVILY with calcium near the figs, the fruit initially would not mature and just sit as green golf balls for months. Now they ripen over the last 3 months of summer and fall.
 
Dennis Bangham
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My LSU figs are on their 3rf summer and always die back but grow a little bigger every time. Not many figs but I planted 4 new ones this summer.  Chicago, Brown Turkey, Celest and O'Rourke.  I have been getting a few fruit already.
How do you protect them?  Wood Chips maybe.  
Did not think of calcium but I did add some hydrated lime and they seemed to respond to that.
 
Tj Jefferson
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I don’t protect them in reality. I just have some played where they get some protection and some in the field. The beauty is that in the silvo pasture that is maturing they will get more protection as the years progress. I use dolomitic lime and calcium carbonate as a foliar spray
 
pollinator
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Takoma violet might be worth a try there. Ronde de bordeaux as well. Malta black should also be hardy enough. Ross in Phily has malta black in ground.
 
Marty Mitchell
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As far as Winter micro climates/protection goes here are the only things I have learned so far that appeal to my lazy/forgetful nature...

1. The warmest part of the yard during the Winter is going to be on the South side of a solid structure.... with that structure being large enough to block all of that nasty wind blowing from the North/West direction. Meanwhile it will also catch that energy/warmth from the Winter sun... so if the structure is either brick or vegetative it will capture and release during the night. Just blocking the wind can make a massive difference. I had a Meyer Lemon survive temps in the teens inside a building (No Wind)… in a pot. They are not supposed to go below 25 without croaking. Anyways... the following year I left it outside during similar weather and it dropped all leaves and died back to the ground. Still came back though surprisingly!

2. Thermal Mass- Can be in the form of water, stone, bricks on a building/wall, or even forest (which always have lots of hydrology going on and cool during the Summer but warm during the Winter).

3. I see lots of fig growers say to mulch deep during the Winter in case it dies back. It will keep the base of the tree alive so it can bounce back.

4. Land Sloping South helps the sun to warm better




Flavor Profiles
Here is a link to a description of different fig flavor profiles. Ranging from Berry to sugar to Honey to Carmel and many more....

https://mountainfigs.net/mountain-figs/8-basic-fig-flavor-pulp-skin-color-modes/
 
pollinator
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We've had a good experience with Michurinska 10 a.k.a. Florea in a similar climate zone in an unfriendly (dry/windy) location. A bonus is that even were it to freeze to the ground (it's tough though), it will still give something of a crop on new branches in the same year.
 
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We are 7B here in El Paso with temps generally making high teens to low 20's for short periods of time.  Below freezing nights most of January.  Every 20 years or so, temps of 0 degrees for a day or so.  Black turkey and mission fig do well here.  I see figs all around town growing alone without any care at all that do fine.  Here they do equally well as the mulberry dropping their leaves the winter but not dying to the ground.  Like a mulberry, the roots will come up if not planted deeply enough.  The larger problem is battling the bugs and birds for the 2 rounds of fruit.  The mission fig I planted a few years ago is 10' or so already.  My other fig, forgot the cultivar, is 15' high and around.  Heavy shade underneath also, like a mulberry.  No bug or other problems with the plant although I would assume one must avoid pruning in the summer, as we have borers that get into everything here.  Seems like there is one species for every plant.  I wonder if the problem in Alabama might be too much water in the winter.  We don't have that problem here, or anytime for that matter.
 
Dennis Bangham
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OH i am waiting for cooler weather.  20s at night sounds like a dream.  We are now topping 97 to 99F.  
The figs I planted this spring all seem very happy now. I added lime like TJ recommended and it came right back to full health.
In winter we do get a lot more rain but I live on a toehill and my problem is underground streams.  They move at will and can relocate right under a tree and drown it in a month or less.  We are undergoing a drought right now so having irrigation is important.
I am actually seeing far fewer insects than normal.  Fewer birds but too many squirrels.  
I now have bananas growing and if it stays warm I can harvest them around february.
The weather is crazy now.
 
Jerry Davis
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"The weather is crazy".  You got that right.  We've been affected by global warming for the last 20 years.  About 5 degrees F warmer this fall, and half the rainfall.  The monsoon basically failed.  The only upside is the warmer winters.  I hope I don't live to see another of those "northers" running down the eastern Rockies and dropping our temps to 0, although we are presently getting some rain from that big snow that hit Montana up north.
 
Marty Mitchell
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Jerry Davis wrote:"The weather is crazy".  You got that right.  We've been affected by global warming for the last 20 years.  About 5 degrees F warmer this fall, and half the rainfall.  The monsoon basically failed.  The only upside is the warmer winters.  I hope I don't live to see another of those "northers" running down the eastern Rockies and dropping our temps to 0, although we are presently getting some rain from that big snow that hit Montana up north.



I heard that storm brought as much as 50" of snow to some places up North. Pretty impressive for the first part of Fall. My area only sees snow a few times a year and it is usually gone fast. On occasion though we see some real snow and a deep freeze.

I hear that we are slipping into a Grande Solar Minimum slowly over the next few decades. It will be interesting to see which way things unfold. If it is true expect to see more geological activity in all forms and more hurricanes (for me on the coast).

 
Marty Mitchell
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Figs for Zone 7A... one half zone colder than where you are.

I found this vid that Ross Raddi made a few months ago. He goes over a list he made for figs he will have in the ground or already has in the ground in Philadelphia.


 
Bryant RedHawk
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Marty Mitchell wrote:

Jerry Davis wrote:"The weather is crazy".  You got that right.  We've been affected by global warming for the last 20 years.  About 5 degrees F warmer this fall, and half the rainfall.  The monsoon basically failed.  The only upside is the warmer winters.  I hope I don't live to see another of those "northers" running down the eastern Rockies and dropping our temps to 0, although we are presently getting some rain from that big snow that hit Montana up north.



I heard that storm brought as much as 50" of snow to some places up North. Pretty impressive for the first part of Fall. My area only sees snow a few times a year and it is usually gone fast. On occasion though we see some real snow and a deep freeze.

I hear that we are slipping into a Grande Solar Minimum slowly over the next few decades. It will be interesting to see which way things unfold. If it is true expect to see more geological activity in all forms and more hurricanes (for me on the coast).



The temperature rise we are in the middle of experiencing was noticed back in the 1980's by some marine biology students and their professors at John's Hopkins Marine Laboratory in Petaluma CA.
They documented over a 1 year period the surface temp and down to 150 ft. depth at 10 foot increments, results showed that from the beginning of the study to the end of this class room project, there was a 0.5 increase in temperature of the upwelling current which was
noticeable from 150 ft. below the surface to 30 ft. below the surface, the last 30 feet showed very little temperature deviation (0.02f) over the duration of the study.

What we are experiencing now is the continuation of this long known about trend, the polar ice melting will effectively shut down the warm currents we have depended on for surface temperature regulation for centuries.
When those warm oceanic currents shut down we will be at the start of the next Ice Age (some are thinking we are already seeing the startup of that sort of event).

I've been keeping records of weather; temp, wind and rain fall for the past 15 years in Arkansas and the trend shows a lateral shift in "seasons".
Winters here are now starting in late December instead of the historic end of October, a two month time line shift which plays out through all four seasons.
Where historically we used to have two weeks of spring and fall, we now experience 6 weeks of those types of temperatures.
Where we used to see a month long "monsoon" season of rains starting at the middle of March, now the rains start in mid January and continue into July, which used to be the middle of our dry season.
Winds have increased in strength and frequency because of the shifts both in temperatures and frequency of High and low pressure shifts.

By the way, Buzzard's Roost is located at an elevation above the computer predicted "High water level" from the polar ice melting completely and raising the oceans 300+ feet from current levels.
Our farm was purchased because of the elevation and location, we have geological features that help to protect us from tornadic events and while we might get stuck by heavy flooding, we will still be dry.

 
Tj Jefferson
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I want them all... I was more involved with NAFEX and sometimes you could pledge cuttings on there. I haven't checked in on it recently. The problem is that you really need dormant cuttings and then a misting bed. I have six that are doing well, not entirely sure they are labelled correctly, and I've sent some cuttings. I have two Brown Turkey (which he must have labelled as something else) varietals, one that came as "Nero" which is any black fig, the LSU purple and Gold (and gold is looking crappy), chicago is thriving.

I should have some this fall/winter. They are easy to get right after they go dormant in November.
 
Marty Mitchell
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Tj Jefferson wrote:I want them all... I was more involved with NAFEX and sometimes you could pledge cuttings on there. I haven't checked in on it recently. The problem is that you really need dormant cuttings and then a misting bed. I have six that are doing well, not entirely sure they are labelled correctly, and I've sent some cuttings. I have two Brown Turkey (which he must have labelled as something else) varietals, one that came as "Nero" which is any black fig, the LSU purple and Gold (and gold is looking crappy), chicago is thriving.

I should have some this fall/winter. They are easy to get right after they go dormant in November.



I usually have decent results cloning plants in a protected spot near the house (back porch) that only gets early morning and late evening Sun.

However, the Best propagation method by far that I have done is Aquaponics flood/drain beds! I have had an almost 100% success rate on ANYTHING I have tried to clone in there. Meyer Lemon, Goji, Figs, Rosemary, Mulberry, Sage, etc. My system is very small with just two 50gal gravel beds but I can clone an insane amount of plants in such a small place. I just take a cutting about 4" tall and slip them in and... well... ignore them.

The only downside I have seen from using Aquaponics for cloning is when cloning something like a Brown Turkey or Chicago Hardy fig. They will root out and grow Insanely Fast in there! I put a small cutting about as skinny as a pencil in (and half as long) in early Spring. By mid Summer it was hitting the roof of the greenhouse about 3 or 4' up. So I pruned it back by cutting the top half off. By late Summer/Fall the side branches were hitting the roof again and pushing the tree over! The roots had claimed most of the gravel in the entire bed by that point and it was a pain to transplant. Long story short... for the aggressive rooted Large Tree fig types it is a good idea to transplant quickly after rooting.

I would imagine that in a single 3' x 4' bed I could clone dozens of trees in a single year. That would pay for the system very quickly which makes it a good tool/skill to learn.

Here is a pic of a Meyer Lemon clone that I started last year and decided to leave in the bed for the year. It will be coming out this Fall and is about 3' tall by 4 or 5' wide. However, it's roots have proven to not be invasive at all. So I may just prune it back at leave it in there. It provided a good space for black swallowtail butterflies to hatch on this Summer. Left a parsley plant in there for this purpose and had a good dozen or two butterflies form from it this Summer for the kids. They LOVED going out early every morning to look for new butterflies and caterpillars. You can see a Swallowtail that just crawled out of it's cocoon in the pick and is beginning to spread it's wings.

For some reason the Meyer DOES get thorns on some branches in the Aquaponics system. The ones in containers do not. Must be different nutrients/amounts of water.

IMG_1235.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1235.JPG]
 
Dennis Bangham
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Marty, I have an indoor aquaponics setup going now. I may try to see if I can do some cuttings.  Thanks for the thought.
As for the crazy weather I am seeing two Banana, that I thought were just ornamental, growing bananas.  
Basajo-Banana-in-North-Alabama.jpg
Basajo Banana in North Alabama
Basajo Banana in North Alabama
 
Marty Mitchell
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Dennis Bangham wrote:Marty, I have an indoor aquaponics setup going now. I may try to see if I can do some cuttings.  Thanks for the thought.
As for the crazy weather I am seeing two Banana, that I thought were just ornamental, growing bananas.  



Since it is indoors... you may be able to take a cutting off of the new wood and get one started. (Supposed to be "Late Summer Cutting") It may not stress out as bad since it is not getting cooked by actual sunlight.

Always take the cutting from more stiffer wood though that won't wilt/fall over and has it's own internal support. Should be strong enough to support itself... but still have thin/little bark.

Of course with Figs and Mulberries... even with thick bark they still have those white specs that later turn into roots.

Nice looking Bananas!
 
pollinator
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I want to follow this thread, because I have a fig tree here in my front yard now for over a year. It seems it's still growing, but slowly. I don't know if it will ever give real figs.
The climate here is comparable to a zone 7 or 8, they say. Never too cold, never too hot, can be cloudy / rainy all over the year, most of all dduring autumn.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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hau Inge, it is probable that your fig tree needs some mycorrhizae in and around its roots.

Ficus trees really benefit from quite a few different fungi being in the soil the tree is planted in.

We have one Celeste fig that wasn't doing well until I injected the root biosphere with mycorrhizae, once they established inside and around the roots, the tree took off and produces massive amounts of figs.

Redhawk
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:

Marty Mitchell wrote:

Jerry Davis wrote:"The weather is crazy".  ....

I hear that we are slipping into a Grande Solar Minimum slowly over the next few decades. ...  


.... What we are experiencing now is the continuation of this long known about trend, the polar ice melting will effectively shut down the warm currents we have depended on for surface temperature regulation for centuries.
When those warm oceanic currents shut down we will be at the start of the next Ice Age (some are thinking we are already seeing the startup of that sort of event). ...


I am curious what will happen here! The climate in the Netherlands is depending so much on the warm ocean current, if (when?) that current will stop, or turn another direction, what will the weather here do? Probably we won't even see ... because all country will be under water. Where I live (Meppel) is exactly at sea level now. Interesting!
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:hau Inge, it is probable that your fig tree needs some mycorrhizae in and around its roots. ...
Redhawk


Thank you Redhawk. I hope this mycorrhizae will show up on their own. I'll add a lot of mulch to promote that.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Currently the ice caps are melting at a relatively fast pace, and the sea ice isn't reforming as deeply as it used to.
The new predictions are that we have around 50 years before the ice is gone. That is if the computer models being used happen to be correct, if you watch the weather forecast, it seems that most of the models are not that reliable at this point.
What we are seeing in the US is infiltration of streets in the low lying coastal cities and towns at this stage of the global warming event.
The problem is that Nature works to keep things moving along. (I am writing a thread about the how and why of the workings of Mother Earth (Nature)). I'll be posting it in the Science forum.

Redhawk
 
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I am in 7b North Alabama and have the brown figs and they do great. Should have full sun, mine fruited the second year. I will share cutting if you like...Danny
 
Marty Mitchell
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Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:

Bryant RedHawk wrote:

Marty Mitchell wrote:

Jerry Davis wrote:"The weather is crazy".  ....

I hear that we are slipping into a Grande Solar Minimum slowly over the next few decades. ...  


.... What we are experiencing now is the continuation of this long known about trend, the polar ice melting will effectively shut down the warm currents we have depended on for surface temperature regulation for centuries.
When those warm oceanic currents shut down we will be at the start of the next Ice Age (some are thinking we are already seeing the startup of that sort of event). ...


I am curious what will happen here! The climate in the Netherlands is depending so much on the warm ocean current, if (when?) that current will stop, or turn another direction, what will the weather here do? Probably we won't even see ... because all country will be under water. Where I live (Meppel) is exactly at sea level now. Interesting!



I am also curious to what we will see in our blink of an eye lifetimes. It will be interesting.

I am attaching a pic of the Earth's Geological Temp Record I found on Wikipedia. It is shown on a Sliding time scale covering just the last 500 million years.

Just the last 3 million years takes up the last 1/3 of the Chart. That is about when Earth slipped into the current Ice Age. You can see from the chart that about every 100k years there is a cyclical ~10k year warming period like the one we are currently in before the Earth slips back into the icy grasp of the ice age. You can see from the chart that out of the last 5 warming cycles (counting this one)… this current one we are in is the Coolest by far. That being said, over the last 7000 years the polar ice caps have fully melted a couple of times allegedly. So it can totally happen again.

Some good things to read up on would be Solar mimimum/maxium cycles, Grand Solar Minimum/Maximum cycles, Lunar Multi Decadal oscillation cycles (18 year moon tracks in the sky) and what their effects are on currents going into/out of the Arctic/Antarctic, Earth's atmospheric carbon record long term (hint it always increases when Earth gets warm and has been many times higher than today and life thrived), and study up on how the Earth's track around the Sun is also on long term slowly changing cycles.

I have learned that during the Grand Solar minimum cycles that happen every few hundred years (and we are supposed to see soon)... The Sun Spot activity gets so low that Solar winds produced by the Sun decrease and at the same time the Earths magnetosphere weakens... allowing more deep space radiation to enter our atmosphere causing ionization. Which causes more clouds to form and more earth quake and volcanic activity to occur as the Earth cools just slightly. Basically expect to see more rain, snow, hurricanes, etc. Cooler air cannot hold moisture as well.

It is so much info and such a DEEP rabbit hole that it will take me many years to fully wrap my head around it. About as deep as nature it'self.

While I am not personally worried about atmo carbon myself knowing what I have learned... I am Very worried about all of the habitat destruction and pollution. Things like the dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake bay are things we can fix. I do hope the Earth gets Warmer! Life usually thrives when it does... and half of what I like to eat would be easier to grow more of if the deep part of Winter got milder.

Here is the link to the Wikipedia page I pulled the chart from. For some reason it didn't download properly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geologic_temperature_record#/media/File:All_palaeotemps.svg



Filename: Geoligical-Temp-Record.svg
File size: 130 Kbytes
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:

Bryant RedHawk wrote:hau Inge, it is probable that your fig tree needs some mycorrhizae in and around its roots. ...
Redhawk


Thank you Redhawk. I hope this mycorrhizae will show up on their own. I'll add a lot of mulch to promote that.



If you can get out into the "wilder" portions of the Netherlands you might be able to gather up some soil samples from tree root areas, those will have mycorrhizae that you can either grow more of or simply dig small holes in your fig root zone and drop in the soil samples you acquired.
You can even simply gather wild growing mushrooms, make a slurry and poke holes down in the fig's root zone and make the addition that way.

Let me know via PM if I can be of further help in this.

Redhawk
 
Marty Mitchell
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Last thread Hijack Post I promise!

Here is a record chart of the Earth's atmo carbon over just the last 800,000 years. It is proving hard to find a chart that goes further back for you when the Earth was warmer. It was Many Times higher than today.

You may notice that each of the spikes in the chart coincides with the warming periods of this ice age... about once every 100k years. Even though it is cooler right now than previous warming cycles the atmo carbon is going higher.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_dioxide_in_Earth%27s_atmosphere#/media/File:Temperature-change-and-carbon-dioxide-change-measured-from-the-EPICA-Dome-C-ice-core-in-Antarctica-v2.jpg

Here is a link to a study performed by NASA. Pinpointing the regions of earth producing the most carbon into the atmosphere. These 3 regions are responsible for the recent spike. Out of our hands...

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-pinpoints-cause-of-earth-s-recent-record-carbon-dioxide-spike

 
Bryant RedHawk
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Marty Mitchell wrote:Last thread Hijack Post I promise!

Here is a record chart of the Earth's atmo carbon over just the last 800,000 years. It is proving hard to find a chart that goes further back for you when the Earth was warmer. It was Many Times higher than today.

You may notice that each of the spikes in the chart coincides with the warming periods of this ice age... about once every 100k years. Even though it is cooler right now than previous warming cycles the atmo carbon is going higher.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_dioxide_in_Earth%27s_atmosphere#/media/File:Temperature-change-and-carbon-dioxide-change-measured-from-the-EPICA-Dome-C-ice-core-in-Antarctica-v2.jpg

Here is a link to a study performed by NASA. Pinpointing the regions of earth producing the most carbon into the atmosphere...

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-pinpoints-cause-of-earth-s-recent-record-carbon-dioxide-spike



Wouldn't it be "the last ice age"?  Since we are not in nor have we been in any type of ice age for almost 200 years.  
Also you might want to look at how many species go extinct when the base temperatures rise above 85 c.
 
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