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great recipe for surplus eggs  RSS feed

 
Leah Sattler
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If you are periodically flooded with eggs like me you start looking for ways to use them up not only because it would be wasteful not to but because eggs are an icredible source of protein.

'puff pancakes' is one of my old standbys for when I have too many eggs (and actually is a favorite that I scrounge for eggs for sometimes!) it is also super easy and  its one of those things that you can prep and then stick in the oven to cook instead of standing over the stove flipping pancakes or french toast or frying eggs and bacon for everyone on a busy morning.

melt 3 tb butter in two cake pans (or as I use medium size skillets)

then mix......

4 eggs
2/3 cup milk
2/3 cup flour
1 tsp of vanilla

split the batter between the two pans/tins and stick in the oven at 375*

I bake for 20 minutes for myself (they will collapse a little after you take them out at that time). If you like things crispier on the edge or would like them to hold their 'puff' for better presentation then bake them a bit longer. If I bake longer I turn the oven down to 325* for the last half. with some whipped cream and fresh fruit they make an outstanding and easy fancy breakfast.





 
Gwen Lynn
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That sounds really good! What you have there looks just like Yorkshire pudding. My friend Kelly always makes that with a prime rib roast, but I don't think she puts vanilla in it for that. It is also extra yummy soaked with beef au jus!

Save me a surplus egg if ya got any! 

 
Jocelyn Campbell
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LOVE these! Fabulous photo, too! Though I've always called them Dutch Babies. I'm guessing it's because the old cast iron Dutch ovens were used for them. They do get the *best* crust in cast iron! Other folks call them German pancakes, I think.

Funny, I use about the exact recipe (just 3/4 cups each flour and milk instead of 2/3rds), but in one pan, not two. I'll have to try it in two pans very soon. I make mine dairy and gluten free, and it comes out a bit too dense sometimes which I was blaming on the ingredients not the quantity.

Thanks so much for posting this, Leah!
 
Leah Sattler
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:
Other folks call them German pancakes, I think.



well I am mostly of german descent and grew up having these regularly. Never thought much about it but I suppose that like other things I grew up eating it was passed down from my german-russian  ancestors!  I also like what my mom always called  guluptsie (pronounced hoolipsee) which is really just cabbage rolls,  and love eating rice with milk cinnamon and sugar both of which I am told are things that were passed down of sorts.
 
Leah Sattler
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next egg recipe!!!

9x9 custard

4 cups milk
6 eggs beaten and pressed through a sifter/strainer
tsp of vanilla
1/2-2/3 cups sugar

rub a stick of butter all over the inside of a glass 9x9 pan. place 9x9 in a 9x13 and fill the bigger one with water. pour milk mix into 9x9 and bake for around 45-60 minutes. (that is my guess, I just watch it) don't over bake! it will look unset but will thicken more after it cools. it just takes making it a few times to judge when it is done. if it is over done it gets a little grainy. perfectly done it is smooth and silky. eat it warm or cold. I usually can't resist scooping it out too early when it is more like pudding.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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I just made Dutch babies (puff pancakes/German pancakes) for brunch today with fresh raspberries and whipped topping - yum! 

I tried my recipe (4 eggs, 3/4 cup gluten free flour, 3/4 cup rice milk, 1 tsp vanilla) split between two pans a while back and they were floppy and weak - didn't hardly puff at all. This morning, I made one batch each per two cast iron pans and they were lovely, golden-puffed goodness! Maybe my alternative ingredients don't work well with less batter per pan.

Leah, that custard recipe sounds oh, so yummy, too! I think I want to try it with coconut milk!!
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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Don't forget crepes (I grew up calling them "rolled pancakes".

Crepes for n:

n eggs
n/4 cups flour
n/4 cups milk (plus some to adjust later)
n/2 Tbs. sugar
n/8 tsp. salt

Beat eggs lightly.  Add salt, sugar, flour, and 1/4 of milk, and stir until uniform.  Gradually add remaining milk and whisk for one minute to develop gluten.

Heat skillet until water will dance when dropped on its surface.  Add oil or butter with a rag or paper towel.  Hold pan at a slight angle, ladle or pour about 1/2c batter for 12" pan, rolling pan to get an even coating on entire surface; excess batter can be poured back into mixing bowl.  Turn when batter is no longer liquid on top or when browned to taste, and cook much less time on second side.  Expect a few to go badly until you get the hang of it.

Reapply oil for every crepe.  Flour thickens over time: thin batter as needed, keeping it a little thicker than heavy cream.

Great with brown sugar and cream cheese.  Even better with fresh or macerated fruit.  Try with a spice mix intended for masala chai, if you can get it.

I prefer it with about 1/3 white flour, 2/3 whole grain.

Even though they cook one at a time, I feel like I'm done cooking these faster than ordinary pancakes.
 
Alison Thomas
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Do you guys put any store in the eggs=high cholestorol line?  Until we got our chooks, I'd limit my egg intake to 2 a week.  Now we have 5 hens and there are 4 folk eating eggs here - loads more egg consumption per week.  Surely they are nature's own fast-food.  How many eggs becomes 'harmful'?
 
Leah Sattler
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I don't buy the cholesterol business. cholesterol is neccesary for your brain and every cell in your body. your body makes waaay more then you eat. blaming cholesterol for heart disease is rather like blaming the plaster on your wall for the hole it patched. medical science hasn't come to a consensus on what causes the damage. (debatable I suppose).  the saturated fat/cholesterol myth is big business. the details are waaay beyond the scope of a post but I encourage you to search out articles and studies and decide for yourself.

here are a few places to start. I just googled a few. that seemed to actually have references and be backed up with science.

http://www.heart-disease-bypass-surgery.com/data/articles/36.htm

this one is 'review' of the ideas/book written buy the guy who is the advocate in the above link.
http://www.cholesterol-and-health.com/The-Cholesterol-Myths.html

http://www.westonaprice.org/mythstruths/mtnutrition.html

I don't limit fat  in my diet at all. I eat a variety of fats. a little vegi oils, quite a bit of  tropical oils (coconut) and lots of animal fats. I am a healthy weight. I eat full fat everything and lots of dairy products. 5 years ago had a whole workup done with a sonogram of my heart, ekg etc due to an inexperienced obstetrician.....and had a perfectly healthy heart. I'm not very old though so I am probably not a great example. but I was told I had "high cholesterol" when I was about 12 years old. 

its interesting to note that breast milk contains large amounts of cholesterol. and restricting fats in children (including cholesterol) results in serious cognitive impairment.






 
Joel Hollingsworth
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I'm with Leah.

They have a drug that messes with your gut to prevent you from absorbing dietary cholesterol.

The drug does lower your serum cholesterol levels, but does not lower the incidence of health problems correlated to high cholesterol levels.  I bet, all else being equal, cutting dietary cholesterol would similarly not have the intended effect.

In my humble opinion, taking that drug is like rouging your cheeks to treat anemia.

I'm not talking about statins, which work differently and seem to soften the body's responses on a slightly deeper level.  It seems like they have their place, but not as large a place as the patent-holders would prefer.
 
Alison Thomas
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what great info - i'll be passing the links on to many of my relatives that are on cholesterol-reducing stuff and are a pain the bum when they come to stay cos they won't eat this and they won't eat that.

was googling sommat else (barlotti beans) and came accross this woman's blog and she seems quite level-headed about this kinda stuff too
http://crabappleherbs.com/blog/category/food/bad-food/
 
Leah Sattler
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not totally related but something to think about. there is some asthma drug commercial that drives me crazy. at the end with the "fast talking" about side affects its says "may increase the risk of asthma related death"......HUH how can a drug, any drug, be considered useful if it increases the risk of death from the problem it is trying to treat? if you check into some of these cholesterol drugs you might find they fall into that category. you also  might find that cholesterol level is a very poor predictor of heart disease and mortality and that many of the studies concerning "saturated fat" were extremely flawed.
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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Leah Sattler wrote:how can a drug, any drug, be considered useful if it increases the risk of death from the problem it is trying to treat?


Prozac and kin (selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors) are horrible this way.  Docs aren't sure if it gives those who would be too depressed to take their own lives enough gumption to do what they'd been hoping to do all along, or if patients expect too much from treatment, or if there's a specific connection between the way the drug works and suicide...whatever the reason, it's sad.

To be fair, NSAIDS (aspirin, Motrin, willow bark tea, Pepto Bismol...) can be considered in the same light.  They help your body not to over-react to irritation, but sometimes that means not clotting, so an injury won't hurt as bad but will stay open longer.

Drugs are complicated.
 
Brenda Groth
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i just printed these recipes off..we are always getting over our head in milk and eggs..and there are just two of us so we don't eat much..wonder if the pancakes recipe could be halved..
 
robert campbell
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Just waned to confirm that the Dutch Baby (or whatever you want to call it) is really great!  I make it for supper with a savory topping, something like pan-grilled mushrooms, greens (spinach or mizuna etc), and bell peppers and a little spicing, add some more protein if you want and a little salt... mmmmmmm!
 
Leah Sattler
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brenda - the recipe half works just fine.

drugs are complicated and of course there are quality of life issues and risk vs. benefit issues. I go a little off my rocker though when It seems that these drugs are being handed out like they are harmless when you know dang well they aren't. I get especially crazy when we are talking about kids and all the scrips that are getting pushed on them.
 
rose macaskie
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I have a good recipe for sweet omelets, You separate the yolks from the eggs and put a bit of sugar in the yolks and for adult ones Gran maniere, i think its two desert spoonfulls with four eggs, You whip up the whites and fold them in to the yolks and fry in butter without turning the omelet you just turn it out so that it doubles over itself cooked bit on the outside and fluffy bit in the middle.
      If its for children and has no alcohol in it you put dollop of jam on top before folding it over and turning it out on to a plate. agri rose macaskie.
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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Those dessert omelettes sound good!

It sounds like orange zest might be a reasonable substitute for triple sec in this recipe.
 
rose macaskie
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They are a really good and easy smart party dessert and it is just made with a bit of sugar in the mix and a dollop of jam on top, just before you turn it out of the pan  instead of gran maniere, f you don't want to get drunk. As the omelet is not cooked through it is pretty alcoholic. I have been remembering and it is it is three eggs to each omelet that serve two people and two deserrtspoonfuls of Gran maniere, Haven't made them for years. I suppose it means buying the Gran maniere, ten euros and more expense. Alcohols cheapish in Spain in England it would be ever so much more expensive. I forgot to say you fry them in butter.

    Was going to try Leahs recipe yesterday but did not have the eggs Leah's one sounds good without being to great a healthy dangerand is absolutely beautiful, though some have questioned the use of four eggs. I don't think it would look that good if i made it,  With my parents we eat eggs for breakfast and maybe at some other moment as a snack or in cakes and nothing happend to us, we were skinny i am no longer skinny. i don't have eggs  now for breakfast, i usually donut eat an egg in the whole day.

  Another very best recipe is, a chocolate cake near pudding made with chestnuts instead of flour. A lot of work peeling chestnuts, there is  a special soft chocolaty covering. The cake should not be too chocolaty it is another recipe of my mothers for guests. it is
4 eggs                                         mix        yolk sugar
  8oz   sugar                                              chocolate melted i put in a bit of water 
  30z chocolate                                            chestnuts, cooked in milk, mashed and drained.
   1/2 pound chestnuts                               whipped whites folded in

sauce                                           mix            yolks sugar chocolate         
  2yolks                                                          and cream in a bain maria i suppose.
sugar ?
chocolate 1/4 pint cream 
  The chololate you use should be a good bar of dark chocolate.

I have not made this for years either. This recipe takes a bit of time. It is really good. These are my best recipes.
    I HAVE BEEN WONDERING FOR A FEW MOUNTHS NOW IF I REMEMBEREED TO SAY THAT YOU COOK THE CHESTNUTS IN MILK AND DRAIN THEM AND THEN MASH THEM BEFORE PUTTING THEM INTO YOUR CAKE MIX.I have added the information now.  agri rose macaskie.
     
 
                                            
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That looks really good. What does it taste like? Does it taste like pancakes? It looks really good!

                              Belle
 
rose macaskie
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  Homestead belle, the sweet omlettes dont look like an omlette  because of their frothy raw-ish milddles. I suppose, they should have a lightly browned outside case that sort of buttery tase then a cooked bit and then your pure froth, in the case of them being granmaniere ones they have not cooked enough on top to loose their alcohol and you never turn them over in the pa you turn them over on themselves folded in half on the serbving plate, they are straight alcoholic. Not the right dish for those who don't want to drink.
  They are thinnish where they have been folded over and fat on the outside edge where all the filling, uncooked froth is bulging out. I hope this makes them easier to cook they are easy and they are really good, they are really for when you have  guests.

     I remember to a woman at a school fate who had a stand making granmanier pancakes , and they are a good way to make money. You make an ordinary thin pancake the french sort, not the fthick breakfast american ones we call scotch pancakes in England and instead of a sprinkling of sugar and a squeeze of lemon, the usual way of serving them in England, you put on a sprinkling of sugar and a dash of gran maniere. There is a similar drink that does in its place, i have not experimented much. i just start to forget to make things i used to make. I don't invite people anymore. It is a bit wicked but people reallly enjoy it and you earn money. as you will be cooking a lot at a fate you wont be left with a lot of granmaniere you don't know what to do with.
She made them for the parents not the children. agri rose macaskie.
     
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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rose macaskie wrote:
There is a similar drink that does in its place, i have not experimented much.


The triple sec family of liqeurs is an exceptionally large one.  I don't go in for brand names like Gran Marnier, especially for cooking: even the cheapest generic I've sampled is very tasty stuff. The fact that it is so easy to do well might explain why there are so many varieties, I guess. Also, they don't really sell cordon jaune (cheaper stuff, for cooking) on this side of the pond, and I bet cordon rouge (for sipping) costs more here than there. There are some interesting cousins in the family that might find a place in my cooking for novelty's sake, like blue Curaçao.

Rose: I wonder if you were thinking of Cointreau, Curaçao, or perhaps Gran Gala or
Mandarine Napoléon?
 
rose macaskie
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        Yes, i have used cointreeau for this recipe, i don't know anthing about these drinks, i dont like sweet orange drinks as drinks.
  On this side of the pond the real question is how much your country taxes alcohol. England has heavy taxes on alcohol and things like cointreau cost a lot, even more as special french drinks, in spain there are maybe cheap spanish versions and the taxes on alcohol are much lower, it is a  cheap-ish place to drink and smoke in. agri rose macaskie.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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So far in my quick skim while reviving this thread we have:
puff pancakes/Dutch babies
custard
crepes
sweet omelettes
chocolate pudding/cake

Plus here is one of the many fritattas we make at wheaton labs (recipe):



Oh, and clafouti - it's sort of a cross between a Dutch baby and a custard, with fruit in it:



We also make deviled eggs and egg salad.

Basted eggs on sauteed bacon-y onions, greens, etc. is one of my favorite breakfasts. Hollandaise sauce on poached eggs is, of course, divine!

We're now experimenting with pickling (brining/fermenting) eggs, too.

What am I missing?
 
Mike Feddersen
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I like to stir up some nice mild salsa with some eggs, the ratio varies as they get crumbly. Served on toast.

Jocelyn your fritattas look amazing.
 
Ann Torrence
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I'm eating eggs poached in a glass ramekin 1/2 full of salsa or enchilada sauce. put some water in a pan, put the glass dish in the pan.
I need to try the clafoutis. My only custard experiment was sketchy, I think because of the altitude.
 
Rebecca Norman
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We always called those puff pancake / Dutch babies "David Eyre Pancakes" and I don't know why. Puff pancakes is a much more descriptive name. We always used to put lemon and sugar on them. They were something impressive for breakfast when we had guests staying at our house.

To use eggs quickly and easily, and just generally to make a super quick meal, I like to make pancakes. Much as I love soaking pancakes in syrup, that's not really a meal most of the time. I like to make them savory, instead -- saute a little onion on the pan first and then pour the pancake batter over it. When they're ready, put some juicy or runny leftovers on top. The sauted mushrooms and greens mentioned above sound brilliant.

I don't measure for pancakes. They're dead easy, after you've done them by measuring from some recipe once or twice. Just a bit of flour with a commensurate small pinch of baking powder, a larger pinch of salt, and then mix these dries together, then mix them into the already mixed eggs. Takes 60 seconds to prep and another 5 to cook. (Especially if you've got a nice greasy iron chapatti pan hanging on the wall!)
 
Bill Crim
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I tried a rye and a potato variant of Leah's original recipe.
  • I tried a rye variant: 2 eggs, 1/3 cup milk, 1/2 tsp vanilla, 1/3 cup dark rye flour. Verdict, crappy. It barely puffed, and honestly was kind of meh tasting. Like eating one of those fiber cereals.
  • I tried a mashed potato variant: 2 eggs, 1/2 tsp vanilla, 2/3 cup of mashed potatoes(made with lots of butter/cream). Verdict, good. It puffed less than the wheat recipe, but more than the rye. It tasted great. I used a lot of half/half in the potatoes.

  •  
    Julia Winter
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    I've discovered the joy of Spaghetti alla Carbonara. I've eaten that at restaurants, but I didn't realize that it's basically bacon and eggs on pasta!

    I started with this recipe from the Spendid Table but when I repeated it the other night I used:

    6 eggs
    3oz freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
    8 oz pancetta (the first time I used bacon, but we liked it so much I checked out pancetta at the local New Seasons grocer. Lo and behold it was the same price as their bacon.)
    glug of olive oil (I mean really, who measures olive oil?)
    fair amount of ground black pepper.

    This is how I did it. I diced up the pancetta (or bacon) into small pieces and put them in my smaller cast iron skillet with olive oil. I cooked the meat at a pretty low temperature for a while (while I was working with the eggs and getting the spaghetti cooking) and then turned up the heat to brown it, because the pancetta wasn't cured and was turning kind of an ugly grey color as it cooked. It turned gorgeous and caramel colored with the higher heat, but I think it was good to cook at a low temperature first, to render out a lot of the fat. (Don't worry, we're not going to waste that!)

    I got out my scale and measured a chunk of cheese. The recipe from ST called for 2.5 oz, I got 3 oz, I figured that was good, since my package of organic whole wheat spaghetti from Costco was 500g, or 17.6oz. Then I grated it with my food processor. I wasn't impressed with what I got - it almost looked julienned, not light and fluffy. I took out the grater blade and put in the puree blade, and used that to mix up the eggs. Again, I upped the eggs from 4 to 6 because eggs are delicious and nutritious. I put the grated cheese in the egg mixture, and pureed that all together, and then ground a fair amount of black pepper in there as well. Now my cheese bits were rather small, so I could rest easy they would melt nicely when needed.

    In the meantime, I had the spaghetti cooking. The ST recipe advised lots of salt in the water, but when I did that, and then used bacon, the resulting dish was too salty. I went salt free this time for the pasta and it was fine (there are a lot of myths out there about cooking pasta). While I was watching the pasta, I was also watching the meat. I pulled bits out of the pan as they reached the right color and eventually it was all cooked and back in the warm pan with the burner turned off.

    Once the pasta is cooked, you have to move fast. You drain the pasta, put it quickly into the serving bowl (generously sized) and then pour the egg mixture onto the hot pasta, stirring as you do so. The heat from the pasta sets the eggs. Once you've scraped out the egg container, you do the same with the skillet, adding all the meat and the fats, and mixing that in thoroughly as well. Eventually I was using two implements to mix, sort of like tossing a salad. I also threw in a bunch of frozen organic peas (yes, I love Costco). There was still enough heat to thaw those, but the dish ended up a little cooler than I would prefer. My daughters thought it was perfect. Next time I might pour the frozen peas into a bowl and just have them sit there, thawing, as I cook the rest of the dish. The sweetness of the peas was a wonderful foil to the rest of the dish, and made it a one pot meal, which I like. My husband thought the amount of salt (from the pancetta and the parmesan cheese) was perfect, I think it could have used a BIT more.

    It is amazing how creamy the sauce is, given that there is no cream. The egg based sauce also explains why you see this at restaurants but not in the grocery store in jars. Since the eggs aren't cooked hard, this is a dish best prepared with non-factory farmed eggs (which have been known to have Salmonella in them).
     
    Jocelyn Campbell
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    Julia Winter wrote:I've discovered the joy of Spaghetti alla Carbonara. I've eaten that at restaurants, but I didn't realize that it's basically bacon and eggs on pasta!

    Oooo, I might try this on zucchini noodles for when we feel like splurging with cheese! (When Paul doesn't have to think.)
     
    mary jayne richmond
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    Leah.. thank you for posting this, i know what were having for supper.... right now i have LOTS of eggs
     
    Jocelyn Campbell
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    Per the puff pancakes aka dutch babies aka german pancakes:

    Jocelyn Campbell wrote:I tried my recipe (4 eggs, 3/4 cup gluten free flour, 3/4 cup rice milk, 1 tsp vanilla) <snip> one batch each per two cast iron pans and they were lovely, golden-puffed goodness!


    Someone on FaceBook asked for my gluten free recipe and this is it, (though these days I use coconut milk, not rice milk). The key, of course, is the gluten free flour. There are loads of available GF flour mixes now, which would work just fine. Though when I went GF 20 years ago, there were not so many, so I experimented a lot with my own mixes, and still do make my own for multiple reasons.

    My favorite main, base flour is sorghum or milo flour. If going grain free, almond flour is beautiful, albeit expensive. For a mix, I usually add in at least some tapioca starch to help as a the missing gluten binder, or flax or chia seed meal (depending on the desired taste and texture). I will also add in other nut or bean flours if I want additional density, protein or flavor. Oat flour (if the oats are GF - gotta watch that for some folks) is beautiful to use as well. Sorghum, almond or oat flours come out tender enough to use on their own, though they will be more crumbly than something made with wheat.

    I find rice flours powdery (except for sweet rice flour found in Asian aisles or markets), and brown rice flour in particular will suck up too much moisture in the recipe. Coconut flour is even worse than brown rice flour, in my experience, in sucking up moisture and making a dry, crumbly mess. So these are better combined with sorghum, almond or oat as the base and with a fraction of the mix as tapioca starch.

    I hear soaking GF flours makes them much, much better, as soaking any flour would. Unfortunately, I'm a dork and decide what I'm cooking usually too last minute to try the soaking first.
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    Leah Sattler wrote:next egg recipe!!!

    9x9 custard

    4 cups milk
    6 eggs beaten and pressed through a sifter/strainer
    tsp of vanilla
    1/2-2/3 cups sugar

    rub a stick of butter all over the inside of a glass 9x9 pan. place 9x9 in a 9x13 and fill the bigger one with water. pour milk mix into 9x9 and bake for around 45-60 minutes. (that is my guess, I just watch it) don't over bake! it will look unset but will thicken more after it cools. it just takes making it a few times to judge when it is done. if it is over done it gets a little grainy. perfectly done it is smooth and silky. eat it warm or cold. I usually can't resist scooping it out too early when it is more like pudding.


    Oh custards! I ate soooooo many custards while horribly nauseous and pregnant. I was fighting to eat enough and get protein (most meat made me horribly queesy and gave me a gag reflex), and custards were one of the few things I could stomach. So, I ate a lot of custard. Yummy!
     
    Jocelyn Campbell
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    Has anyone tried alternatives to cane sugar in your custard? I made one with maple syrup recently that was lovely, (albeit still a lot of glucose spiking sugar).
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    I used honey when I made mine. I cannot remember how much honey, now, but I was trying not to use a lot. Since my two year old breastfeeds and has food sensitivities, I haven't had eggs, or custard for two years!
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    Ah-ha! I just remembered that I'd written the recipe down. I hunted it down, and here it is:

     5 eggs
     2 tsp vanilla
     2 cups whole milk
     1/4 cup honey
     Dash of cinnamon on top
     
    Jocelyn Campbell
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    Nicole Alderman wrote:Ah-ha! I just remembered that I'd written the recipe down. I hunted it down, and here it is:

     5 eggs
     2 tsp vanilla
     2 cups whole milk
     1/4 cup honey
     Dash of cinnamon on top

    Brilliant! I might be trying this one (maybe with brown rice syrup?) soon. Thanks Nicole!
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    I hope it works for you! Disclaimer: I'm really not the best cook! I do recall trying to make it more eggs than anything (because I really needed the protein), so it may not taste exactly like custards are supposed to. I do think that rice syrup would work just as well as honey--honey was just the most affordable non-sugar sweetener that I had access to!
     
    Anne Miller
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    Thanks everyone for all the egg recipes! I made a Fig Clafoutis as it uses 3 eggs and was it good! After trying some of these above recipes, I plan to make it again without the fruit. I made mine crustless. If I have some ripe veggies from the garden I might use those.
     
    Dana Jones
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    I love angel food cake!


    1 cup Unbleached All-Purpose Flour or Unbleached Cake Flour
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    12 large egg whites, room temperature
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla or almond extract, or a combination
    1 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar


    Directions
    1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Grease and flour your angel food cake pan.
    2. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour and 3/4 cup of the sugar. Set aside.
    3. In a large mixing bowl, combine the egg whites, salt, and extract. Beat until the mixture is just frothy, then sprinkle the cream of tartar on top and continue beating until the mixture forms stiff, glossy peaks.
    4. Add the remaining sugar, 1/4 cup at a time, then gradually fold in the dry ingredients.
    5. Spoon the batter into the pan, and bake the cake for 40 to 45 minutes, or until it's golden brown and the top springs back when lightly touched.
    6. Remove the cake from the oven, and set it upside down with a bottle through its center cone to keep its top from flattening on the counter. Let the cake cool for 1 1/2 hours. This cooling period sets the structure, and keeps the cake from collapsing.
    7. Loosen the edges of the cake with a knife, and remove it from the pan.
    8. Store the cake, covered, on the counter for up to a week. Freeze, well wrapped, for up to 3 months.

    I never do the bottle thing and I dump out the cake while it is still hot. BECAUSE I WANT A PIECE NOW!! It never lasts a week, either, much less THREE MONTHS!


    Then what to do with all those egg yolks?? Crème Brule of course! (just finished eating one) I double the recipe.


    Crème Brule
    Ingredients
    6 egg yolks
    6 tablespoons white sugar, divided
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    2 1/2 cups heavy cream
    2 tablespoons brown sugar

    Directions
    1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C).
    2. Beat egg yolks, 4 tablespoons white sugar and vanilla extract in a mixing bowl until thick and creamy.
    3. Pour cream into a saucepan and stir over low heat until it almost comes to boil. Remove the cream from heat immediately. Stir cream into the egg yolk mixture; beat until combined.
    4. Pour cream mixture into the top pan of a double boiler. Stir over simmering water until mixture lightly coats the back of a spoon, about 3 minutes. Remove mixture from heat immediately and pour into a shallow heat-proof dish.
    5. Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes. Remove from oven and cool to room temperature. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or overnight.
    6. Preheat oven to broil.
    7. In a small bowl combine remaining 2 tablespoons white sugar and brown sugar. Sift this mixture evenly over custard. Place dish under broiler until sugar melts, about 2 minutes. Watch carefully so as not to burn.
    8. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Refrigerate until custard is set again.

    I never put in the refrigerator to cool before I put the sugar on top. I put the sugar on top while the crème brule is warm, right out of the oven, and pop it back in under broil. DO NOT walk away from the oven. Put the light on and peer anxiously in the oven so you can snatch it out before it burns. You want the sugar to melt and there is a fine line between melted sugar and burnt. I usually use ramekins that have a plastic pop on lid. I also use a small Corning casserole dish and that is for sharing with a neighbor. We eat the first ones warm. Sooooo good! Then I put them in the refrigerator.


    Mamma Wall's Eggnog

    Mamma Wall was my great grandmother. My mother who died last year at age 92 said she remembered Mamma Wall making eggnog on Christmas morning for breakfast. Everyone drank eggnog--even the little kids. I came from a non drinking family, except for eggnog! I never understood how my straight laced parents allowed me to get snockered on eggnog. LOL

    12 eggs, separated
    12 heaping tablespoons sugar
    12 jiggers (shot glass) whiskey
    1 pint whipping cream
    A little milk

    Beat the egg whites until stiff.
    Beat the whipping cream until stiff.
    Beat the egg yolks, adding the sugar a tablespoon at a time.
    S-L-O-W-L-Y add the whiskey a jigger at a time to the egg yolk mixture, beating the whiskey in. Too fast and you get scrambled eggs.
    Fold in the whipping cream.
    Fold in the egg whites.
    Add a little milk. Stir.
    Top with nutmeg or cinnamon.

    I hope you enjoy this recipe, it is a family tradition passed down for generations. Since we are basically a non drinking family, I cut the whiskey amounts in half and only use 6 jiggers. Full strength blows our heads off. LOL

     
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