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Roses and permaculture?

 
gardener
Posts: 2003
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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you don't have to grind the rose hips to powder to use them in tea. put them in whole and steep longer.
 
pollinator
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Location: Unincorporated Pierce County, WA Zone 7b
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My skin was feeling irritated from our first bout with the summer sun and hot days. So, I decided to try making rose water. Hands on time was about two minutes, waiting time about 25 minutes. It made a lovely, free facial wash and immediately calmed my skin down. I'll be repeating that all summer long.

 
Thekla McDaniels
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Posts: 2003
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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great idea. I've got so many roses right now, that I have been giving some to the goats (they love them)... just the ones that the petals are about to drop anyway. It should take no time at all to gather plenty, and my skin can always use help. thanks for posting
 
Posts: 24
Location: Alabama
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An addendum to the rose water, you may apply a little as a final rinse for lasting fragrance to your hair.
Rose water lemonade. Seriously. Try it.

Make rose extract same as you would vanilla extract with bourbon or vodka. Rose shortbread cookies are so divine!
 
Thekla McDaniels
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You can put rose petals in honey and the honey takes on the flavor of roses, but moisture also goes into the honey. Therefore it may no longer prevent things from growing in it. Once you have the rose infused but more watery honey, reduce the moisture, refrigerate it or freeze it or something. It is wonderful, and worth the bother, but I just don't count on it being nonperishable as proper honey is.

You can also layer rose petals in what ever kind of sugar you use, and it will flavor the sugar.
 
Posts: 6
Location: SW Washington State; Latitude 47; elevation about 475'
hugelkultur forest garden books
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Roses "clone" or grow their own roots too, very well.

I love to watch for the foliage condition as the year progresses and choose to take cuttings from bushes (or climbers) doing well toward autumn.

Usually just put them in dirt, two or three nodes (de-leafed) maybe with a vertical score or two to induce root growth.

Pictures soon. Once a cutting strikes roots Roses do well nestled up with other shrubs or trees or fences. Free and beneficial :--)
 
pollinator
Posts: 433
Location: Clemson, SC ("new" Zone 8a)
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Susan Lenore Stanley wrote:Roses "clone" or grow their own roots too, very well...  Free and beneficial :--)



Oh so true.  I have species rose (rugosa) growing all over my homestead, almost all the result of root suckers taken from only a couple of original purchased transplants.  Why?  Because why not?!  They're free and seem to thrive here (although after five years some of my original, once vigorous bushes are severely dying back - don't know what to think about that).
 
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Matthew Nistico wrote:

Thekla McDaniels wrote:A locally owned nursery has a highly fragrant thornless variety of our local wild rose.  They found it hiking, took a cutting, propagate it.  I just found it this summer and brought one home.  (pricey in a 5 gallon pot!)   It has taken root, and settled in well.  Several new stems from under ground.  I have no idea what the hips will be like, or how much it will spread ( I hope it will spread to the goats' side of the fence).  Will have to wait til this time next year to know.

Certainly if it does thousands of wonderful things, I'll let you all know, and encourage the owners of the nursery to propagate the plug size for the mail to  permies business.  They also propagate silver buffalo berry from wild gathered seeds, and many other fine native to this area or xeric plants.

I was going to say they do not have a website, but look how wrong I am!  http://chelseanursery.com/

great people, but I don't know if they ship.

Thekla



A thornless wild rose?  If indeed it demonstrates good qualities, they may have stumbled onto a real gem there.  They should name it and start propagating, if that ends up the case - they may have a money-maker on their hands.

 
Matthew Nistico
pollinator
Posts: 433
Location: Clemson, SC ("new" Zone 8a)
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Matthew Nistico wrote:Previous posts have already highlighted the many benefits and uses of roses: nutritious hips and edible petals, potential use in growing a thorny hedge/fence, trap crop for aphids, bee fodder, ornamental value (which I agree with previous posters: permies should never undervalue beauty in our systems!).  I have also found my wild species roses are a great trap crop for Japanese beetles, if you have those in your area.

Like many here, I grow rugosa rose and have found it to be tough as nails.  It's propensity to root sucker is both annoying and useful: requiring frequent attention if I don't wish my bushes to turn themselves into thickets, but also providing an endless supply of easily transplantable new roses.  But, I don't know how much the hybrid tea roses the OP inherited with her land will follow this same pattern.  I will also note that I was skeptical at first how well they might do in my heavy clay soil, since rugosa famously enjoys sandy places (I've read it is known to colonize beach dunes).  They go crazy here!  I think the take home lesson is that if you want a surefire, rapidly growing, rapidly spreading, and early producing species to jump start a bare patch on your property, wild roses are a good bet.

So, the question remains: should you maintain your hybrid roses or replace them with other species, including possibly wilder rose species?  I would say give it time and let the roses tell you what to do with them.  Give them no chemical care or overmuch attention and see how they respond after a year or two.  If they continue to thrive, then you have learnt something about them, and you have enjoyed some free visual appeal to your otherwise empty lot while it is in its early establishment phase.  As the rest of your systems mature, you will see how these roses fit into your growing landscape: whether their size and position are convenient for you or not.  You might then chose later to replace them with some even more hardy and productive wild rose species if you found they were in a good spot.  If they don't survive the neglect, then your decision has been made for you.


UPDATE: Not long after I wrote this post, my own various rugosa rose thickets began to die back.  And this, as I'd originally pointed out, after 4-5 initial years of rampant, seemingly unstoppable growth.  The first year of trouble was a drought summer, so that might have had something to do with it.  But then in subsequent years they continued to decline.  And in all areas of my property at once.  Now I have only a few straggling suckers left.

So far I have not attempted to replant them.  Given that people say rugosa are incompatible with my soil type, I took their eventual die off as a sign that they shouldn't exist on my property.  I might relent and give them another try one day, but only if I don't come up with something else to attempt in those spaces first.  One of the two bigger spaces I've already used to start a pineapple guava.
 
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