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! 2018 Off-Grid Rocket Kitchen Build, May 17-19  RSS feed

 
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This workshop is FREE, but it will be limited to 6 highly functional people. 
If we have to pick and choose, we will pick 3 based on solid applicable skills, and 3 based on scope of past contributions to the Wisner/wheaton labs collaborative ventures (Deep Roots, Kickstarter patrons, Permies staff, that sort of thing.)

Please reply here if you would like to be considered for inclusion in this workshop.

What we're doing:
- Rocket Cookers and Water Heaters: We will be moving some of the cool toys from Base Camp up to the lab, and playing with the Sidewinder and other cookers already installed at cooper cabin and Allerton Abbey.
- Off Grid Water 101: These sites use hauled water for all purposes.  We will be building or improving infrastructure for handling potable water and sanitation, camp-kitchen style, and sharing some tips for other types of situations (camping, relying on surface water or hand-dug wells, rain harvesting, etc)
- Sun Power: Solar cookers, solar PV chargers for cell phones, lights, etc.  Because not all kitchen chores happen in daylight, and some of us collect recipes electronically these days.  (Plus, how to leverage a solar dehydrator to enable life-without-refrigeration)
- Gourmet Camp Cooking: we'll be cooking together over campfire coals, rockets, and maybe pulling out some solar ovens and other fancy stuff.  There may be a Biscuit Baker Challenge for the best baked goods without electricity.
- Does it Blend?  Ergonomics, work flow, and where to locate the smoothie station...
- Gearing and Goodies Run: Saturday is market day in Missoula - time to get some yummies, and visit Free Cycles to admire their bike-powered blender.
(And scope out their bone-yard, where we may pull parts and ideas for bike-geared appropriate tech Ernie wants to build during the PPDC.)




This is a twofer opportunity:
- Build a nice, functional kitchen for our course participants, who will be cooking together and individually throughout the PPDC,
- Take some good photos and video of our favorite camp-kitchen tricks - I'm working on a set of handbook-style resources on Camp Comforts: Off-Grid Kitchens and Conveniences, and possible video projects along the same theme.

- Three-fer, if you like us and want to hang out.


Are you in?

Love,
Erica and Ernie Wisner (we don't count toward the 6, but we'll be there.)
Staff note (paul wheaton):

This three day event will be happening as part of the "schmoozaroo" https://permies.com/t/schmoozaroo

Staff note (paul wheaton):

If you wish to be considered for this, please reply to this thread mentioning your qualifications (skills and/or support for previous projects).

 
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This looks super cool, and my husband Eliot is pondering a trip.  (I was already planning for a trip in early June, but if he can't go I'd think about it for myself).
 
master steward
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The schmoozaroo will be happening at about the same time.  People at the schmoozaroo will get some opportunity to peek at projects and visit with the celebrities that gather for this event.

https://permies.com/t/schmoozaroo

Participants in the bootcamp will probably be directed to help with these builds in a variety of ways.  But there are only two spots left:

https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp

This event is about preparing for the upcoming "Peasant PDC" for which there are still openings:

https://richsoil.com/ppdc.jsp



If you are interested in being one of the six selected for this, please post to this thread mentioning your qualifications (skills and/or support for previous projects).  Erica will be the one selecting the six people. 




 
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What an awesome opportunity - Rocket Kitchen Workshop. 


I'm but lowly on the DIY totem pole, but I think I'm moderately street and build smart, for a city slicker.  i've contributed to patreon, but only a little bit thus far.  anyway, i'd love to come and be part of a kitchen build!  i think the kitchen and the textile washing (washing 'machine' / drying ) areas are the most important parts of the home, and knowing how to set things up in a way where cooking and washing is fun and effective, is critical when shifting paradigms and technologies in our daily lives.

:)
 
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I'd be interested would love to connect again...
 
Erica Wisner
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Peter Chan wrote:What an awesome opportunity - Rocket Kitchen Workshop. 


I'm but lowly on the DIY totem pole, but I think I'm moderately street and build smart, for a city slicker.  i've contributed to patreon, but only a little bit thus far.  anyway, i'd love to come and be part of a kitchen build!  i think the kitchen and the textile washing (washing 'machine' / drying ) areas are the most important parts of the home, and knowing how to set things up in a way where cooking and washing is fun and effective, is critical when shifting paradigms and technologies in our daily lives.

:)



Hi Peter, do I take it you're applying for a spot in the kitchen build workshop?

To give us an idea of your DIY level, would you be willing to attach a couple of photos of something you've improvised for yourself along the DIY lines?

If you are a resourceful recycler, maybe you would enjoy checking thrift stores and community exchange areas in your city for components? See below.

randall gabriell wrote:I'd be interested would love to connect again...



Randall, it would be great to see you again.  You are a strong candidate on my short list for applicable skills...
...

Peter, you get points for broadening the 'washing' idea to include laundry.  It would be neat to tie in a small-scale, "urgent laundry" setup to recycle water from the dish-rinse, and feed greywater more conveniently into the gardens nearby.
And even if most folks do laundry in town on days off, we could use some indoor drying facilities in case of rain.

Useful items to make this happen:
Recycled, gently-used items can often be found at waste transfer/dumping areas, recycle centers, thrift stores, yard sales, free piles, and on college campuses near the end of spring term. 
We could use:
- Cotton towels (any color or age)
- Some wooden shelving
- a wicker laundry basket or two, maybe other baskets for harvesting greens / winnowing seeds
- a wooden, folding clothesline rack for indoors (wall mounted, floor, or some of each) 

Preference will be for natural, non-toxic, non-plastic components - stuff that can easily be composted or recycled when it passes beyond its useful life.

This gets my amateur basket-weaving creative juices flowing, too.  If you have access to willow, osier dogwood, or other bendy sticks that don't have buds yet, coppice a few.
It's surprising how long even "ugly" basket will hold up and do its job, with more charm and grace than a cheap plastic alternative.

Yours,
Erica
 
Peter Chan
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Erica,

Yes, I'm interested in the kitchen workshop.  I don't have an easy way to get pictures onto my computer right now since I got rid of my cell phone data plan, but I've:


1. installed 'linen shelving' (https://www.homedepot.com/p/ClosetMaid-SuperSlide-72-in-W-x-16-in-D-White-Ventilated-Wire-Shelf-4735/100146445)  above my sink (3 levels) in the style of a Finnish cupboard: https://www.today.com/home/what-astiankuivauskaappi-finnish-dish-drying-method-you-need-t118613. ; I cut them to the correct length with a hack saw, and then I put a screw in to the wall, and secured the screw to the shelf using thin wire like a twisty tie.  This was to prevent the shelving from moving around, as they weren't installed with brackets underneath, but rather resting on something on each end....hard to explain, wish i had a picture.

2. made a shaving brush stand out of an old wire coat hanger.  it looks pretty cool, and i saved $15 bucks buying one premade.

3. adjusted three treadle sewing machine bases so that they are properly adjusted for actually using with a sewing machine head and a leather belt.  i use these instructions to do so: http://www.treadleon.net/sewingmachineshop/treadles/servicingtreadles.html.

4. converted a featherweight sewing machine to a hand crank --- oddly enough you can still buy a hand crank conversion assembly which says 'Made in China' in english as well as Chinese characters.  this has been my fav sewing machine for some reason, and i've sewn everything with it, from a canvas carpentry work apron, to house curtains. I also stripped the cabinet for the hand crank machine and restrained and finished it. 

5. rewired a table lamp using parts from the local hardware store.

6. started the process of saving my car from the rust bogeyman, by sanding out the rust spots, and then priming them. i never got to finish the process with the final finishing paint as it rained the following day, and then I was hit and car pretty much totaled.

7. built wood kitchen shelving with a carpentry friend, and dabbled in re-chiseling hinge spaces on a door with a hand chisel.


i guess that's the extant of my DIY.  not too impressive, but not the worst either i imagine.


I'd be happy to see if I could scrounge up some cotton towels and baskets.  i'm def. a basket person, and would love to learn how to prepare basket materials and weave them!!!  but it's always hit or miss finding baskets at goodwill.  I would want more detail on size of baskets (diameter and height), and handle type (arch, or two handles on each side).  
 
Erica Wisner
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Seems like some of you multi-talented people may be wondering what skills to mention.

Skills like cooking, or scrounging, definitely count. 

We have a lot of stuff already built, that just needs moved up to the site and arranged.  So we can be somewhat flexible about the skills we really need.

Skills I would value highly:
- rough carpenters: decking, temporary roofing; tables, racks, benches or seating logs; solid spaces for kitchen equipment, supplies; protect electrical & greywater systems where they cross paths. 
Cabinetmakers, timber framers, or other skilled joiners could turn a rough affair into a work of art
- mechanics: potential for welding, creative bike-mechanic work for custom gearing & chain/axle drives/PTOs, maintenance checks on electric and conventional farm equipment.
- masonry and natural building - rocket stove building, operation, and/or maintenance; possible plastering or mortar repairs
- fiber, wicker, and weaving addicts;
- electrical skills: connect the PV system with some LED kitchen lighting, cell phone chargers, and run my laptop so I can share digital files & slide shows with you.  (Experience with the Wheaton Labs solar PV systems, and/or the electric farm equipment, would be a big plus.)
- basic plumbing and leveling: the plumbing doesn't need to be permanent, but we do need to set up dispenser tanks for hauled water (potable and non-potable), and some temporary greywater drains (hose style most likely)
- outdoor landscaping skills: experience with road, path, and trail maintenance; ditch-laying; roundwood construction.  (Your own pickup truck, or a local friend willing to lend you one, would be a plus.)
- kitchen design or ergonomic layout, including experienced cooks and community-living designers.
- Cooks: camp cooks, farm-to-table chefs, folks with experience in various community kitchens with a good feel for the ergonomics of shared cooking spaces.



I'm open to other offers.

(Peter Chan, you're not the biointensive garden guru, are you?  It's a fairly common name. 
If that is you, then maybe you would bring special super-powers that would relate to greywater harvesting and processing for safe use in kitchen gardens?)
 
Peter Chan
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Erica Wisner wrote:
- fiber, wicker, and weaving addicts;

(Peter Chan, you're not the biointensive garden guru, are you?  It's a fairly common name. 
If that is you, then maybe you would bring special super-powers that would relate to greywater harvesting and processing for safe use in kitchen gardens?)



No, I'm not the biointensive garden guru.  I'm pretty new to this forum.  However, I did forget to add that I am a fiber, wicker and weaving addict.  I spent time in Guatemala learning from locals how to weave on the backstrap loom.  I took a class once and made my own broomcorn broom, and I still have the simple tools to do this again.  I've washed many pounds of wool with hot water and soap, and have experimented with the suint method, which I don't think actually worked that well (was using Suffolk wool), and I've spun a skein of wool and a hand spindle, and i've also taken a few weaving classes.  unfortunately, although i've done these things, it's something i do daily, and thus, have to learn again each time i sit down to try. 

other than an obsessive desire to learn how become a basket weaving master, but not much time to dedicate to at this time of life, and the ability to scrounge, i don't think i can offer you much of what you're looking for.  i cannot haul heavy things as i'm working through some health challenges right now.
 
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Would like to be there, you guys are so far away!  Are you going to be anywhere in the eastern US doing any workshops? how it attached, just finished tiling my fireplace.
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Erica Wisner
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Peter Chan wrote:Erica,

Yes, I'm interested in the kitchen workshop.  I don't have an easy way to get pictures onto my computer right now since I got rid of my cell phone data plan, but I've:

1. installed 'linen shelving'...
2. made a shaving brush stand out of an old wire coat hanger.  it looks pretty cool, and i saved $15 bucks buying one premade.
3. adjusted three treadle sewing machine bases so that they are properly adjusted for actually using with a sewing machine head and a leather belt....
4. converted a featherweight sewing machine to a hand crank --- ...
5. rewired a table lamp using parts from the local hardware store.
6. started the process of saving my car from the rust bogeyman, by sanding out the rust spots, and then priming them. ...
7. built wood kitchen shelving with a carpentry friend, and dabbled in re-chiseling hinge spaces on a door with a hand chisel.

...

I'd be happy to see if I could scrounge up some cotton towels and baskets.  i'm def. a basket person, and would love to learn how to prepare basket materials and weave them!!!  but it's always hit or miss finding baskets at goodwill.  I would want more detail on size of baskets (diameter and height), and handle type (arch, or two handles on each side).  



Sounds like you are a sewing and fiber addict, one of the categories I just decided to include. 

I would be totally delighted to see an off-grid sewing machine added to our camp luxuries that first week... it could significantly improve the comfort level as we go on with the PPDC, H PDC, and future visits.
I can think of so many uses for that, not just in the kitchen, but also for camping gear, firewood totes, and Ernie's favorite canvas buckets for hauling water.

It is quite practical to put together a portable camp kitchen using mostly fabric - I made Ernie a canvas kitchen setup that mounts in a cupboard in the family fishing boat, or rolls up and fits in a bucket for on-shore camping. 
We're planning a bigger kitchen for this particular context, so fabric is more for the finishing touches than the initial structure, but it would still be welcome.

Curtains are not only pretty, they function as insulation, manual controls on passive solar, privacy barriers, and can also provide insect control if designed with that in mind. 
(Or in rougher settings, a towel/curtain rack can do these jobs plus hand wiping. ;^))

Item descriptions for scrounging:
- Baskets: roughly bushel-sized baskets for laundry, smaller ones for serving / linens / herb drying.  Nothing so big as a closet hamper, we will need to fit these in the hand washer or in a car for town laundry runs.  Something that fits easily in the arms, or under one arm.
- Kitchen towels: A few larger towels in good shape, a bunch of not-so-perfect larger towels that can be cut down for kitchen rags and drying rags. 
- Scrubbies: 100% compostable, things like loofah, sea sponge, or the knitted or crocheted washable scrubbies in any natural fiber (cotton, linen, jute, hemp, etc). 
- Those cloth grocery bags, which can be used for all sorts of sorting and transporting.
- A couple of firewood totes, water-resistant natural canvas would be ideal.  (I can bring my oilskin goop if you find plain cotton canvas ones). 



Yours,
Erica W
 
Erica Wisner
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Terry Wilson wrote:Would like to be there, you guys are so far away!  Are you going to be anywhere in the eastern US doing any workshops? how it attached, just finished tiling my fireplace.



Cool, that looks like quite a project!
I don't have any immediate plans for a trip East, but we've been discussing whether to do something like a "Show-and-Tell Tour" later in the fall. Visiting projects that people have built using our books and plans, and scheduling a few speaking events or site visits as needed. Depends on a lot of other factors.

-Erica
 
Peter Chan
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If fabric and thread was brought, I would bring the hand-crank sewing machine.  In case anyone else is interested in such a thing, the sewing machine is an antique Singer, model 99, that was originally motorized.  I took the motor off, and purchased a hand crank adaptor assembly, which means that you replace the original wheel and then add the hand crank part.  I screwed a dresser handle, one on each side of the machine's wooden base (a box, if you will), so that I can carry it around more easily.   It is wonderful to bring outside and put on a table on a warm day, and sew away, hopefully under a shade cloth or a tree's sun-spotty canopy.

As for domestic textile helpers...

Curtains - yes, they are wonderful and warm up a space so well.    I've found that linen or other bast fiber fabrics are best for any materials used in contact with water, such as shower curtains, dish cloths, or bath towels.  I was apprehensive at first to try making a shower curtain with linen...for some reason I thought the water would come straight through and onto my bathroom floor.  but, i took the plunge, and while showering (in a very small stall mind you where water splashes about quite a lot), the linen shower curtain becomes saturated, but still acts as an effective barrier.  Also because it is linen, i find it is more mold resistant, but the final assessment is still to be concluded, as to how it performs in comparison to cotton in this regard.  

Item for scrounging:

- Baskets: thanks for the details on the baskets.  bushel size baskets are def. harder to find at goodwill or salvation army, but one never knows until you does a goodwill tour.

- Kitchen towels or dish cloths?   I find that dish cloths made out of linen appear to be bacteria-resistant, as they remain fresh-smelling for much longer than cotton dish cloths (not that I'm a proponent of using the same dish cloth for more than a day before washing it to reuse again, depending on what you're eating/washing).   I think that an 10oz hemp or linen of a somewhat looser weave but not too loose works best, and in either a natural brown color or dyed a dark color.  for drying towels, i think 8-10oz weight fabrics are good.  of course a plethora of cheap cotton towels can be found at goodwill.

- Scrubbies: 100% compostable, things like loofah, sea sponge, or the knitted or crocheted washable scrubbies in any natural fiber (cotton, linen, jute, hemp, etc).  I haven't found loofah's to be durable or very effective in scrubbing dishes, have you?  haven't tried a sea sponge for anything other than wetting the back of water-activated cellulose packing tape or envelopes...  i think a knitted hemp dish cloth might work pretty well as a scrubby, but haven't tried it.  i would like to score a tampico brush for the purpose of scrubby, and the dexter-russell pan scraper Paul recommends for use with cast iron pots has been very useful in my kitchen. 

- Those cloth grocery bags, which can be used for all sorts of sorting and transporting.  these are very easy to make!!!

- A couple of firewood totes, water-resistant natural canvas would be ideal.  (I can bring my oilskin goop if you find plain cotton canvas ones).  also would be very easy to make if wooden dowels, canvas, and heavy duty thread are to be had!




 
Peter Chan
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I also forgot to mention what I've been discovering in my own kitchen, but i'm guessing you all already have this figured out! :)

I don't use much dish soap anymore, especially since I make my own from grated hard soap bars and dr. bronner's liquid soap and washing soda.  instead, i keep the Dexter-Russel scraper Paul recommends (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002CJNBSK/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1), and a bowl with a mix of washing soda and baking soda with a spoon.  when i have stubborn crusties, i scrape them, and then sprinkle some of the mix onto the crusty, and then scrub with the dishcloth.  it works very well. anything i can't get off with this method stays on, as i'm not willing to use any chemicals for course, nor willing to use micro plastic scrubbies, that shed micro plastics down the 'drain.'   i'd like to try using ground garlic mustard seeds as a replacement for the baking soda/washing soda, but i don't have anything to grind the seeds with right now.

for washing clothes, i'd really like to try horse chestnuts this season, as prepared as the famed soap nuts are prepared.  i also thought this might be an interesting thing to experiment with as a dish soap replacement.  because, soap isn't a disinfectant as i was surprised to learn...rather, it makes things slippery, so bacteria will 'slide off' of whatever you're trying to clean.  thinking about this and how for my most of my life i thought soap was an antibacterial really makes me giggle.

of course, as everyone knows, an apron is essential when washing dishes, to keep clothes cleaner for longer, requiring less laundry. :)   just thoughts i thought might help get creative juices flowing.
 
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Erica and Ernie,
My name is Jeremy Adams and I moved my family to the country 3 years ago from Denver where I did everything construction related from frame to finish work started as a custom finish carpenter but have literally done everything from start to finish including electrical, plumbing, some HVAC, tons of custom builtins and kitchen cabinets, drywall and plaster, tile and stone work just to name a few.
So where I am now, we moved to a town of about 140 people, where I along with my boys completely renovated  a house where I built my first RMH based off your original plans with the exception of shorter piping and bench. Also built a root cellar with a gazebo built on top, and also built a 1300 sq ft green house where we do aquaponics (raising tilapia) where I also built my second RMH with a 10' bench which heated the entire greenhouse for the winter. I am always interested in learning new things and experimenting with new things " trying them in my back yard" I'm sure you know where that quote came from. Let me know if you have any additional questions. I'd love to learn more as we have just bought property in Stonewall Colorado where we are going to set up a small community of like minded friends and family.
Have a great day thanks Jeremy. I'll get pictures to you when I get home wed to show you the 2 RMH, stone work, and custom cabinet work at my personal house.
 
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Erica Wisner wrote:
(camping, relying on surface water or hand-dug wells, rain harvesting, etc)



I can't come, but I'm interested in learning the best way to drive a wellpoint type well, and what size is best.
 
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I'm interested in being considered - I'm staff, I'm pretty sure I've supported every one of Paul's Kickstarters and more than a few others, and I'm a Patreon supporter.

My skill set is that my work is as an engineer in the semiconductor world (electrical engineer with lots of experience with mechanical, process, chemical and robotics),  I can cook and have a lot of cast iron, I've also done a few small scale building projects to include workshops, sheds, decks, house remodels and the like (with my own tools), I can dowse a bit, and I don't mind getting dirty at all. My weaknesses are a bum shoulder and a bad back. I will grind through what ever needs to be done and will say when I can't do something. I am really interested in the whole off grid kitchen setup and Paul can attest to me drooling over the various RMH and WOFATI projects at the Lab.
I've been planning, depending upon my work schedule, to take a week off for the schmoozaroo.
 
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I have been waiting for this wonderful opportunity! My qualifications:
Single Mom, home schooling five children- 4 boys 1 girl. I am hands on, and mechanically inclined, I sew, make cold pressed lye soap, enjoy wood shop, and have designed my own Straw Bale home- for off grid living. Still a dream of mine.

I cook, & clean, am old fashioned, and sing and dance. I live a clean life and love God. It's true, I'm REALLY old fashioned.

I camp, and live off grid at home occasionally- just for fun.

Thanks for considering me.
 
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Hey Erica!
I would love to come work with you guys. We just bought our homestead not far from basecamp. I’ve converted a small dirt floor garage into a barn for our 6 pigs and 3 lgd. I’ve also designed and will be finishing in the next week a permanent 1.5 acre rotational grazing paddock system. I don’t have much experience with rmh yet but we do have plans for the future. My biggest asset is my desire to learn and willingness to fail and reiterate. I’ve done some basic carpentry.
 
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I'm guessing you have a great deal of folks trying for a spot,  that being said, I farm in north east Iowa and with the super late season start (as in not at all yet) the chances would be little that I could fly my bird (aircraft) for a visit and build time.  But I would like to offer that if you would like anything CAD drawn up and presented, I would certainly help in doing so, if you have some dimensions for every step of the way of any of your builds.   This, if done right, gives every part a 3-D size and shows exactly the process in which things were done.  Almost creating a step by step tutorial.   This also gives chances to do entire builds with hardly a brick cut, by experimenting with the shape placement.   I have built 2 different 8" J's and one 8" batch box, (these are working great)--- as well as watching 2 small 4" J's built of steel that simply didn't work,  do to misguided info.--- i.e  advice from someone that had never built a working RMH.

I enjoy helping folks make a working project correct or almost so, and get it done right the first time.

I do this for aircraft, RMH's, large shed doors and meat smoking units. Or large BBQ units.

Wishing you all the best!

 
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Hey, I'd like to be considered as well, if there are still spots. It's a long way to travel, but I've been wanting to get out to your area and visit Wheaton Labs, so what better chance, right?

DIY cred:
-work for a small natural home design/build company; currently building a post-and-beam strawbale house 
-this sweet little camping rig for my truck is a personal project - oh weird, I don't seem to have any pics for that one. It's a sleeping platform with hinged panels for accessing gear in lower storage. I can get a pic once I clean it out...
-most of the way done with a tincture press. Got stymied by the number of broken drill bits from drilling out a stainless steel bowl. Talked to a few pros who said that's just part of the drill, um, territory, with stainless.
-never led a cob project, but have contributed to my fair share of cottages, benches, and ovens.
-I made my bed once. No really, mostly from recycled wood:

Anyway, thanks for considering me, happy to answer any questions, and I understand if there are more qualified folks ahead of me (not an autoCAD tech yet!)
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Platform Bed
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Post-and-Beam frame
 
Posts: 4
Location: Fernie, BC
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Hi Erica,

I may be interested in attending the workshop with my girlfriend who lives in Missoula.  We have met, I worked on the Tipi build with you and the rest of the workshoppers a ways back and had a great time.  I was the only drywaller from Fernie BC there

Keenly,
Darren

 
Posts: 20
Location: Portland, OR
2
bike dog woodworking
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As drfood suggested, and now that I can see my schedule, I'd like to come and help/learn.

Other than last year's innovator event I mostly draft behind my wife in these parts - she just tells me all the good stuff and I remain in the shadows.

I can build stuff with wood - most familiar with dimensional lumber but not afraid of raw wood.  I have a good kit I can bring to that end - including my lovely battery powered and corded chainsaws.
Plumbing - PEX & PVC, galvanized if necessary (what kind of pipe does Paul allow up there?  PVC is evil.  PEX might be too, but its so easy).  Have PEX tools.  I've replumbed kitchens, cabins and old farm houses.
Landscaping - particularly helpful with a tractor/loader.  And if its really needed I should be able to bring the F150, though I cringe at the fuel inefficiency of bringing it from Portland.
Electrical - I'm good with household stuff and re-wiring tractors.  Haven't had a chance to play with the PV systems there.

Hope I can help out!
 
Erica Wisner
gardener
Posts: 1230
Location: Okanogan Highlands, Washington
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books cat dog food preservation hugelkultur
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So many good people to choose from!
We will be looking over your past contributions and announcing the final decision tomorrow, Friday April 27.

Last call to recruit your spouse, partner, BFF, long-lost brother, or anyone else you want to put their name in the hat before we pick the final 6.  Please let them know to reply here ASAP.
If you have discovered a schedule conflict and won't be able to come if picked, now would be a good time to let us know.

For our selection process:
Please consider posting links to projects you've documented here on the Permies.com forums, or send me a PM or email.  Project photos, off-grid tools you would like to bring, the different email address(es) you used for past contributions - anything that may not be obvious to our selection committee from your public Permies.com posts.

email: questions@ErnieAndErica.info

Thanks,
Erica W
 
Anthony Cooley
Posts: 33
Location: Near Missoula
2
homestead kids pig
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Have you chosen the lucky 6?! Either way, I look forward to seeing this project happen!
 
Erica Wisner
gardener
Posts: 1230
Location: Okanogan Highlands, Washington
229
books cat dog food preservation hugelkultur
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We are contacting the lucky 6 people privately, to confirm they are still able to make the dates. 
If you don't hear from us soon, please make sure that your email on your Permies profile is correct, or look for a "PM" (private message / Purple Mooseage) in your Permies inbox.

Those who are on the wait list are still welcome to come for the Schmoozaroo, hang out after hours, and check out the results. 
https://permies.com/t/schmoozaroo#705864
 
Erica Wisner
gardener
Posts: 1230
Location: Okanogan Highlands, Washington
229
books cat dog food preservation hugelkultur
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OK, here it is officially: The lucky 6.
Based on past contributions, skills needed, and a certain winnowing due to availability:

Bill Erickson
Eliot Mason
Randall Gabriel
Jeremy Adams
Tony Cooley
Scott Weinberg

Please let me know if this will be your first visit to Wheaton Labs.
I sent an email to everyone with details.
Randall, the email address I have for you did not go through.  The other 5 should have a basic description of the game plan.

We are very much looking forward to seeing you again, and/or meeting you, next week!

Other folks still interested should look at the "Schmoozaroo" description; you could come anyway and hang out outside of course hours. 
https://permies.com/t/schmoozaroo#705864


p.s. My apologies for the delay in announcing this.   
In addition to my usual business and client work, we have had 6 fires in my district in the past 2 weeks, 3 controlled burns and 3 wildfires, plus re-ignition complaints on one of the wildfires.  4 of these fires occurred between 6pm Thursday the 26th, and 9pm  Friday the 27th, the day I had originally intended to announce this list.  I got a bit distracted.  Add in two out-of-town medical appointments and a 3-day training conference, and I think we've discovered the limits of my logistical brainpower. 

If you know someone who would enjoy being a part-time executive assistant or office support for a couple of fire-obsessed permies, from a distance or otherwise, please have them PM me.

Yours,
Erica W
 
master steward
Posts: 4761
Location: Missoula, MT
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More thoughts and ideas about off-grid kitchens and this weekend's activities in the skiddable canning kitchen thread.


 
The world's cheapest jedi mind trick: "Aw c'mon, why not read this tiny ad?"
rocket ovens
https://permies.com/t/86578/rocket-ovens
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