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Summary

This sickle is made by the creator of the Hori Hori garden knife and Rechargable Headlamp. They come with their own leather sheath and sharpening stone. Here's the description from the amazon page:
 
  • Single piece blade forged from 1080 high carbon steel boast has a hardness of HRC 54 (+/- 1) allowing it to hold its edge longer than most comparable tools.
  • Thick, stylish black leather sheath keeps the blade protected and fingers safe when not in use.
  • Tapered and smoothly polished 12" Beechwood handle includes a pre-drilled hole for easy hanging.
  • Free sharpening stone included - quickly sharpen your blade and make weed cutting a breeze.
  • Quality Guaranteed by Truly Garden - a 5-star seller with thousands of 5-star product reviews.

  •  


    Where to get it?
     
    Amazon.com

    Truly Garden's website
     
    Related Videos
     

     
    Related Threads
     
    Truly Garden Tools
    Hori Hori garden knife
    Rechargable Headlamp
    Bypass Pruning Shears
    What are everybody's favorite or most necessary tools?
    Garden Tools - Recommendations?

     
    Related Websites
     
    Truly Garden's Website
    Truly Garden's Facebook Page
    COMMENTS:
     
    pollinator
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    I saw those last week and considered buying one. But I wondered what it would do better than a billhook, and I didn't understand the angle of the handle. It looks too short to use standing, but at too much of an angle to use kneeling?
     
    master steward
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    I give this sickle 10 out of 10 acorns! My husband and I had a blast trying this out. In the words of my husband, "It's the tool I've always wanted!" It's like a short and sharper version of the ploskorerez Fokin hoe. I love how it comes super sharp, and the  little crook the blade makes when it connects to the handle helps kind of "rake" plants away.

    My husband wanted to take the first wack with the sickle--note, we didn't watch any videos or instructionals before tying this out. If we had, we would have realized we weren't using it for it's "intended" use of slicing small weeds by cutting through the soil. Instead, we used it for cutting grass and weeds. It worked great for that, too!

    Here's my husband using the "grab and chop" method of cutting:



    You can see the before and after of the area he cleared below. It took maybe 2 minutes (I mean, you can watch him do half of it in the above video!)

    before
    after


    Then I took a swing at using it, but didn't use the grab-and-chop. I just swung at the grass (One time I was trying to show my husband how much faster a traditional sickle was to use than whatever tool he was using. And, needless to say, I sliced my hand trying to show off! Ever since then, I've tended to keep my other hand out of the action when using a sickle.) So, I tried just swinging this sickle at the grass, and it cut cleanly and nicely!



    Here's my husband showing the different angles that seem to work best for the two different ways we used it.


    I really liked how little plastic was used in the packaging. It came in a thick paper mailer, with just a little bubble wrap around the handle and thin film of plastic around the blade, likely to keep it sharp. The blade was in the nice cardboard box, and the sheath and sharpening stone were separate. I tend to lose my sharpening stones, so I was super happy to have one included in the package! The sheath is wonderful, too, because I have little kids and--even though I'm storing this up out of reach--I like that it's double-protected by the sheath!

    click to make bigger


    I tried to get some good pictures of just how nice and sharp this thing is.

    click to make bigger
     
    click to make bigger


    All in all, I'm really pleased with this beautiful sickle, and look forward to trying it out for it's intended purposes!

    For those wondering how people usually us this, here's some videos I found on youtube (it looks like it's sometimes called a "Japanese weeding hoe" or "Japanese razor hoe" as well):



     
    Posts: 7534
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    My timing is off...I just bought one from someone else and it was not exactly what I wanted so Steve has claimed it and I bought another from someone else again!  

    They are a wonderful tool and this one at Truly Garden looks exceptional just like all of their tools...the price is great also

     
    Judith Browning
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    Jordan Holland wrote:I saw those last week and considered buying one. But I wondered what it would do better than a billhook, and I didn't understand the angle of the handle. It looks too short to use standing, but at too much of an angle to use kneeling?



    The angle makes it useful to use while squatting, sitting on a stool or the ground or bent from the hips as I do to protect my back.  I have been using ours to cut garden weeds off at ground level this summer as it is wonderful for getting in small spaces where my scythe or even my sickle would be too big.  A billhook does one thing as far as I understand? This tool can be easily repositioned in one's hand to hoe, trench or cut weeds at ground level or deeper....although what I have is very similar it is called a korean hand hoe or ho mi...maybe this one is not intended to 'hoe' along with cutting weeds?
     
    Jordan Holland
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    Judith Browning wrote:

    Jordan Holland wrote:I saw those last week and considered buying one. But I wondered what it would do better than a billhook, and I didn't understand the angle of the handle. It looks too short to use standing, but at too much of an angle to use kneeling?



    The angle makes it useful to use while squatting, sitting on a stool or the ground or bent from the hips as I do to protect my back.  I have been using ours to cut garden weeds off at ground level this summer as it is wonderful for getting in small spaces where my scythe or even my sickle would be too big.  A billhook does one thing as far as I understand? This tool can be easily repositioned in one's hand to hoe, trench or cut weeds at ground level or deeper....although what I have is very similar it is called a korean hand hoe or ho mi...maybe this one is not intended to 'hoe' along with cutting weeds?



    If it's used for digging or hoeing, then that explains the angle. A billhook cuts soft or woody plants, so that's technically one thing. It's not used for digging, though it could be, but it would dull the edge. While many other tools can slash or chop, what sets the billhook apart is the hook. It allows you to reach into tight areas and pull straight back to easily clear soft vegetation. These look interesting...I'll probably end up with one eventually.
     
    eco-innovator
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    Thank you so much for jumping in on this thread guys!  This is Dre at Truly Garden. :)

    The angle of the hand sickle is indeed for hoeing.  :)  
     
    Judith Browning
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    Dre Oeschger wrote:Thank you so much for jumping in on this thread guys!  This is Dre at Truly Garden.

    The angle of the hand sickle is indeed for hoeing.    



    oh good! I was afraid I might be suggesting a use that was not so.

    In that case, I will promote even more as one very similar is the first one that I bought...wish it was from you but I did not see it when I went looking awhile back?

    The weight, the angle, the handle length all work to allow us to easily change position from slicing off at ground level, to slicing off just under ground, to actually digging out the root ( or all kinds of things!)....and to 'cultivate' a row and add a furrow for planting...a multi purpose tool for sure. We keep ours pretty sharp, maybe sharper than one would a hoe or shovel but those function better with an edge also.

    For this tool and other hand tools I have more and more worked from a bent at the hips position leaning to the ground with a flat back....squatting is good also but my knees have refused lately...my guy uses hand tools while squatting or just sits cross legged on the ground.
     
    Dre Oeschger
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    Judith Browning wrote:In that case, I will promote even more as one very similar is the first one that I bought...wish it was from you but I did not see it when I went looking awhile back?



    Thank you Judith  We just introduced this tool late this spring.  We will be doing a giveaway this week here on Permies as part of it's initial push! I intend to start a new thread with a question that will give us ideas for other tools we should consider improving.

    Best,

    Dre
    Truly Garden
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    Dre Oeschger wrote:

    Judith Browning wrote:In that case, I will promote even more as one very similar is the first one that I bought...wish it was from you but I did not see it when I went looking awhile back?



    Thank you Judith  We just introduced this tool late this spring.  We will be doing a giveaway this week here on Permies as part of it's initial push! I intend to start a new thread with a question that will give us ideas for other tools we should consider improving.

    Best,

    Dre
    Truly Garden



    Speaking of giveaway, here's the link to the giveaway!!!
     
    gardener
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    I like the idea of this having a short handle - I find I don't have enough control over long-handled tools and usually end up cutting something I did *not* want to cut. Could those of you who have one of these, comment on the difference they find in control of long vs short?

    Also, does this actually work in heavy clay soil? I'm finding things that work in good soil, just don't work for me. I'm working hard on soil building , but the areas that are a problem are the very ones where Himalayan Blackberry and Burdock need removing!
     
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    At this very moment I have no idea what I would use the hand weeding sickle for because I have yet to move to my future forest garden. The move will happen in about 3 weeks and I expect there will be more uses for the hand sickle than I have time to do especially since first frost can happen in September in the northwoods of Wisconsin (Zone 4b and on the border with 5a). The land around the cabin has been mostly untouched for the last 50 years or more but it does have some struggling blueberries and other wild edibles like the winter fern and wintergreen as a starting point. The soil is sandy and I expect it will need a lot of care to build up a fertile base. By the time the land and cabin become an inheritance I hope to have a food forest capable of some self-sufficiency so a lot of composting, planning, planting and weeding in my future. I can't wait (well except for all the packing and moving and unpacking).
     
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    I am interested in using these. I stopped work recently with sore wrists. I was wondering what modifications such as a strap to allow shoulders to take some of the weight, that you have ever seen or considered. Being off grid doesnt always come with perfect health. However, I believe we can modify and create in such situations. Any ideas?
     
    Jay Angler
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    Ivonne Buckley wrote:I am interested in using these. I stopped work recently with sore wrists. I was wondering what modifications such as a strap to allow shoulders to take some of the weight, that you have ever seen or considered. Being off grid doesnt always come with perfect health. However, I believe we can modify and create in such situations. Any ideas?

    "Sore wrists" isn't very specific, but 1) using lots of mulch so the surface of the soil doesn't bake hard, so it's easier to work can help, 2) putting material on tools that increases the friction so you don't have to grip as hard may help, 3) I found that until I built up strength, a "D" handle was better than a straight shovel, although watching videos of the proper way to use a straight shovel will help in its use, 4) there are some wrist issues which are affected directly or indirectly by poor upper back, neck and shoulder strength and positioning, so looking into exercises and stretches to help those area may end up helping the wrists, and 5) when I had a shoulder injury that wouldn't heal, my cousin sent me an article about the role of Vit D in healing and I was amazed at how much and how quickly it did help, so looking carefully at your overall health and diet to see if there could be something you need more of to help you build strength and control pain in a healthy way may also help.

    As you can see - there's not likely one simple answer! Permaculture is all about seeing the system as a whole and looking at how all the parts interact!
     
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    "Perfect for intimate chop and drop, the best tool I have for digging holes in my sod and clay loam soil to plant trees in the lawn, "  I don't understand how it can be small enough for "intimate chop and drop" and at the same time be big enough for digging holes in sod and clay for trees....unless they are microscopic trees. Could you explain? and how does it stay sharp if you re digging into the soil?  I would love one tool, especially one that is small and fairly light, for all sorts of garden/food forest chores, big and small, if such a thing is possible. Thanks
     
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    I would feel bad about using something that sharp in the ground.  It looks like it would work great for above ground weeding around plants and not disturbing the roots.  Mulch doesn't stop everything.
     
    Dre Oeschger
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    Jay Angler wrote:Also, does this actually work in heavy clay soil? I'm finding things that work in good soil, just don't work for me. I'm working hard on soil building , but the areas that are a problem are the very ones where Himalayan Blackberry and Burdock need removing!



    The head of the hand sickle is quite robust.  That being said, heavy clay soils will put extra strain on any garden tools.  I think that a better approach would be to use either this tool or our Hori Hori to chop and drop the burdock and help it along as it is already working to improve your soil as a dynamic accumulator.  Anything with huge taproots like that are working to break up hard soils.  
     
    Dre Oeschger
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    stephanie gelfan wrote:and how does it stay sharp if you re digging into the soil?  I would love one tool, especially one that is small and fairly light, for all sorts of garden/food forest chores, big and small, if such a thing is possible. Thanks



    It comes with a sharpening stone so that you can keep it sharp.  Hoeing through the dirt is indeed going to affect the edge.  Here is a video that Patrick put together showing you how to keep it sharp:

     
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    Wow, this garden  sickle looks like the tool I need.
     
    Jay Angler
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    Dre Oeschger wrote:

    Jay Angler wrote:Also, does this actually work in heavy clay soil? I'm finding things that work in good soil, just don't work for me. I'm working hard on soil building , but the areas that are a problem are the very ones where Himalayan Blackberry and Burdock need removing!



    The head of the hand sickle is quite robust.  That being said, heavy clay soils will put extra strain on any garden tools.  I think that a better approach would be to use either this tool or our Hori Hori to chop and drop the burdock and help it along as it is already working to improve your soil as a dynamic accumulator.  Anything with huge taproots like that are working to break up hard soils.  

    Yes, I've been chopping and dropping the Burdock and using it for mulch in place or near-by, but some of it is in awkward spots and sometimes it gets too big before I realize and then it's *really* hard to chop the main stem. Sometimes the  main stem is so big that my long handled pruners won't go around it, so I'm wondering if you think your tool would "chop" the stem. The specific plant I'm thinking of is in a spot where I couldn't swing a machete without hitting things I don't want to hit. It seems too time consuming to use my collapsible saw and I'm not sure how effective a saw would be on it - would it cut it or just make a mashy mess? I've got two hori hori knives, neither of them from your company, but I wouldn't have thought either would be best for this task. Maybe I'll take a picture and post it and then everyone can weigh in on their approach!
     
    stephanie gelfan
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    Excellent! Thank you! great sharpening video...and that answers my question! So it would be a very good not-too-big tool to carry with me for all sorts of gardening and even in-the-woods activities. thanks again
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    Mike Schroer wrote:I would feel bad about using something that sharp in the ground.  It looks like it would work great for above ground weeding around plants and not disturbing the roots.  Mulch doesn't stop everything.



    That way my husband's thought, too! He wants to save it for cutting plants so we don't dull the blade.
     
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    I made one similar to that from a pool cue and a knife. I cut the cue just passed the joint  then unscrewed the joint and the knife had a hole where the handle was I put the screw threw the hole and used crazy glue and screwed it back together while the glue was still wet.
    ab2cccc8937508bea0f5141357eb7319.0.jpg
    [Thumbnail for ab2cccc8937508bea0f5141357eb7319.0.jpg]
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    Jay Angler wrote:

    Dre Oeschger wrote:

    Jay Angler wrote:Also, does this actually work in heavy clay soil? I'm finding things that work in good soil, just don't work for me. I'm working hard on soil building , but the areas that are a problem are the very ones where Himalayan Blackberry and Burdock need removing!



    The head of the hand sickle is quite robust.  That being said, heavy clay soils will put extra strain on any garden tools.  I think that a better approach would be to use either this tool or our Hori Hori to chop and drop the burdock and help it along as it is already working to improve your soil as a dynamic accumulator.  Anything with huge taproots like that are working to break up hard soils.  

    Yes, I've been chopping and dropping the Burdock and using it for mulch in place or near-by, but some of it is in awkward spots and sometimes it gets too big before I realize and then it's *really* hard to chop the main stem. Sometimes the  main stem is so big that my long handled pruners won't go around it, so I'm wondering if you think your tool would "chop" the stem. The specific plant I'm thinking of is in a spot where I couldn't swing a machete without hitting things I don't want to hit. It seems too time consuming to use my collapsible saw and I'm not sure how effective a saw would be on it - would it cut it or just make a mashy mess? I've got two hori hori knives, neither of them from your company, but I wouldn't have thought either would be best for this task. Maybe I'll take a picture and post it and then everyone can weigh in on their approach!



    I took mine outside for a few more swings. I don't have any juicy thick plant material thicker than Himalayan blackberries. I cut a few different plants with it. It seems to work best when cutting near the ground. I cut an inch-thick thistle with one swing before I made the video (I sadly don't have any other thistles to try it on).



    I was really happy with how I was able to clean out the buttercups around my currant bushes with this. I just get the blade right up to the trunk and pull away from the trunk, slicing all plants in the way. Very nice!

    It does not cut through thick woody material well. I tried chopping at a thick (1 inch) huckleberry branch that was in my way, and after 10 hacks at it I decided that was so not worth the effort.

    I also haven't figured out a good technique yet for using this in LONG trailing blackberry patches. A few strands of trailing blackberry are fine, or when they are all short, but if there's a lot of long ones they get tangled around the sickle and you have to stop to un-tangle it.  
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    Ivonne Buckley wrote:I am interested in using these. I stopped work recently with sore wrists. I was wondering what modifications such as a strap to allow shoulders to take some of the weight, that you have ever seen or considered. Being off grid doesnt always come with perfect health. However, I believe we can modify and create in such situations. Any ideas?



    I have pretty weak wrists, and mine were a bit unhappy with me after going out and using this like it was a machete. The nice thing is, though, it does have a long handle. I find I do better with something that has a handle that's long enough for me to use two handed. That spreads the impact over two wrists, rather than just one, and helps stabilize the wrists. It's harder to swing to chop that way, but for it's intended use of pulling along the ground while sitting, it's easy to use two hands.  
     
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    Looks like a wonderful tool and compact enough to carry to the back 40 for a little work! I hope to use one someday.
     
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    Waiting anxiously for mine to arrive
     
    Dre Oeschger
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    Jay Angler wrote:
    Yes, I've been chopping and dropping the Burdock and using it for mulch in place or near-by, but some of it is in awkward spots and sometimes it gets too big before I realize and then it's *really* hard to chop the main stem. Sometimes the  main stem is so big that my long handled pruners won't go around it, so I'm wondering if you think your tool would "chop" the stem. The specific plant I'm thinking of is in a spot where I couldn't swing a machete without hitting things I don't want to hit. It seems too time consuming to use my collapsible saw and I'm not sure how effective a saw would be on it - would it cut it or just make a mashy mess? I've got two hori hori knives, neither of them from your company, but I wouldn't have thought either would be best for this task. Maybe I'll take a picture and post it and then everyone can weigh in on their approach!



    I feel like I need to go take mine up where some burdock is and see what it can do. :)  We just moved onto 15+ acres in Panhandle Idaho and there is a lot of wild around to play in.  Our focus has been on a shelter for winter though currently. :)
     
    Dre Oeschger
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    Congratulations to the four winners!

    Thank you for all of your help with the giveaway, Nicole! :)

    If anyone else would like to help us with our initial push for this tool on Amazon please just search for and purchase one on Amazon and leave us an Amazon review.

    Only reviews from full price purchasers are counted as verified reviews on Amazon. If you purchase a Truly Garden Hand Weeding Sickle this August, please let me know that you did here on Permies.  


     
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