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Summary

Paul Wheaton and Alan Booker continue their review and discussion of the big black book, Bill Mollison's Permaculture - a designers' manual.

Figure 1.1 Evolution from contemporary agriculture to a permaculture (continued)

IV Conservation accounting: life from richness (continued)
Bar 11: Loss to pests.

V Social accounting
Bar 12: Employment on farm (human design and/or skills replace most machine systems).
Bar 13: Food quality produced.
Bar 14: Human and environmental health.
Bar 15: Life quality, as 'right livelihood'.

"Thus it can be seen that a transition from contemporary western agriculture to conservation farming and permaculture has most benefits for people and to other life forms, farming can become energy productive, and farms can produce real income without public subsidy, in particular if farm products are already matched to local or regional demand."

1.3 Permaculture in Landscape and Society
Permculture skills can be added to any other set of human endeavours, beyond agriculture. Ecoculture means to tend wild spaces, help biodiversity and productivity, and to maintain a balance of land use and habitat maintenance.  There are similarities between permaculture and native American agriculture systems, and many other indigenous cultures.  Identify and encourage local food plants rather than rip everything out. Camas prairie. Develop a romantic relationship with nature rather than making it your personal bitch so nature and humans benefit.  Two responsibilities - 1) get your own house and gardens in order. 2) limit our population so we don't become the final plague.  We are fast approaching the need for refuges for all wildlife.  A half acre permaculture paradise garden preserves two acres of native habitat.

Relevant Threads

"Permaculture - a designers' manual" forum

The Big Black Book - summary, reviews,and where to buy

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This podcast was made possible thanks to:

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COMMENTS:
 
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Loving this series. Thank you for putting together.
 
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Any chance Allan could provide the reference for the interspecies quorum sensing/ increased phytonutrients in polycultures? That is super exciting!
 
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Lina Joana wrote:Any chance Allan could provide the reference for the interspecies quorum sensing/ increased phytonutrients in polycultures? That is super exciting!



There is now an increasing amount of scientific research in this field, but still not that many general-audience articles. For a less technical introduction, try these two articles:

https://www.no-tillfarmer.com/blogs/1-covering-no-till/post/8519-a-lesson-in-quorum-sensing-and-what-matters-in-your-soils
https://greencoverseed.com/quorum-sensing-in-the-soil-microbiome/

Here are three articles from research journals to get you started on the formal research:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1369526602002741
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1360138512002142
https://www.nature.com/articles/ismej2013240

 
Lina Joana
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Thanks, just what I was hoping for!
 
master pollinator
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That last part, about the statement 'A half acre permaculture paradise garden preserves two acres of native habitat' I found very interesting. I think that needs some thorough research, to find the exact numbers (like Allan suggested).
 
steward
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In this podcast, I liked the distinction that Alan Booker made between "permaculture" and "ecoculture" - that the former focuses on human-centric yields and that the later emphasizes people acting as a keystone species in an ecosystem.
 
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Dave Burton wrote:In this podcast, I liked the distinction that Alan Booker made between "permaculture" and "ecoculture" - that the former focuses on human-centric yields and that the later emphasizes people acting as a keystone species in an ecosystem.



I love the concept of humans being a keystone species, thanks Alan for introducing me to that!
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