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Get Free Blueberry Plants from Existing Bushes!

 
garden master
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Blueberries are one of my favorite fruits!

They are easy to grow once established, generally pest free, and can be a great plant to fill in a natural food forest!

Blueberries send up side shoots from mature blueberry bushes that can be separated from the mother plants and form new blueberry bushes.

You can find the full instructions and pictures at my blog at https://www.naturalplantnursery.com/post/propagating-blueberries-from-suckers-side-shoots

NaturalPlantNursery.com

Here's a photo of one that's been dug up, labeled, and ready to be transplanted to it's new home!



Blueberries do best in a nice moist, mostly sunny spot, and can be used to fill in naturally wet areas, that may not accommodate other plants as well.

Here's a photo of two suckers coming up from the mother plant, which is out of the picture to the right.



And here's a quick video I made of the process too! Hope you enjoy it!



Have you done this before to reproduce blueberries? What kind of blueberries are you growing?

I'd love to see pictures!
 
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Good to know, thanks!
 
Steve Thorn
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Chris Emerson wrote:Good to know, thanks!



Glad it was useful!
 
pollinator
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Steve, this technique has been described to me as "root disturbance". Basically you can induce a new shoot by exposing a section of feeder root to sunlight, and then transplant the child to a new location. I really like this technique, it doesn't require any special equipment, and the roots tend to be much better developed than traditional peat moss layered cuttings. You have to be a little careful not to stress the parent plant too much and optimally expose a good distance from the parent so you aren't taking more root than you have to. I wait at least 2-3 years before doing it, then let the plant recover if you are taking a significant portion of the feeder system. Some vaccinia seem to allow this more readily, I have had more success with rabbiteye than northern or southern.

Looks like a great system for you, nice work!
 
Steve Thorn
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Thanks Tj!

Tj Jefferson wrote:Steve, this technique has been described to me as "root disturbance". Basically you can induce a new shoot by exposing a section of feeder root to sunlight, and then transplant the child to a new location. I really like this technique, it doesn't require any special equipment, and the roots tend to be much better developed than traditional peat moss layered cuttings.



Yeah, I've found this to be one of the simplest and easiest forms of plant propagation!

I've seen the root disturbance or exposure method like you mentioned above, on a pear tree that I have, where two new trees started growing up from the roots. To me with the blueberries it's basically like the root disturbance method, but with blueberries they seem to send up these new shoots that just have roots on the side closest to the main plant, with the new shoot coming straight out from the main plant and then up from the ground, like the plant is purposely constantly spreading outward, which I love about them!

You have to be a little careful not to stress the parent plant too much and optimally expose a good distance from the parent so you aren't taking more root than you have to. I wait at least 2-3 years before doing it, then let the plant recover if you are taking a significant portion of the feeder system. Some vaccinia seem to allow this more readily, I have had more success with rabbiteye than northern or southern.



Yeah, I think Fall would be the best time to do this in my area, which gets hot quickly in the spring and very hot in the summer. This would give the main plant time to adjust and grow even more roots in the winter and also for the new plant to do the same in its new location!

Looks like a great system for you, nice work!



Thanks again Tj!
 
pollinator
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I have 4 blueberries in pots. Cuttings never worked for me. I will be trying this method too.
 
Steve Thorn
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Gurkan Yeniceri wrote:I have 4 blueberries in pots. Cuttings never worked for me. I will be trying this method too.



I haven't tried rooting blueberry cuttings yet, and I will avoid it if I can.

This way was super quick and easy, and the plants seemed to have a jump start with their small existing root system, and they are already conditioned to growing outside.

The transplanted blueberry plants are growing really well in their new spots, and I plan to post a video of them soon!
 
Steve Thorn
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This is an update from the suckers/new shoots that were planted.

They were planted in a very moist location, and are growing very quickly!

Hopefully they'll produce a few blueberries next year!

 
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