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What to Use if You Are Out of Eggs for Pancakes and Baked Goods

 
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Next week we will be out of eggs and bread.  The bread is easy as I can just put the ingredients in the Bread Machine and soon have fresh bread.  I even have some homemade bread kits though I am going to save them for later.

I was thinking what could we have for breakfast and I naturally thought of pancakes. Darn, the recipe calls for an egg.  Below are some information I found from various sites that I copied/pasted, bad me.  I didn't even go to their website, just took it off the google search.  I also found some info for substituting milk.

I am including a recipe for Eggless Puff Pastry.  The picture looks like the person fried it like the stuff at fairs and carnivals. One of the comments said this was more like pie crust. If I make it I will have to substitute yogurt for sour cream.

And I found a nifty chart for the substitutions.



Eggless Puff Pastry

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup butter, chilled and diced    
1/2 cup sour cream
   
Directions

Place flour in a medium bowl. Cut in butter until mixture is the size of small peas.

Add sour cream. Stir with a fork until pastry forms a ball. Wrap in plastic and chill overnight. When ready to use, roll pastry thinly (about 1/8 inch).



https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/15140/eggless-puff-pastry/



 
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For replacing egg in baked goods (for recipes that on ly use and egg or two), I like a tablespoon flaxmeal blended with about two tablespoons hot water.  Beat it with a fork and it gets a stretchy, eggy consistency.
 
Anne Miller
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Oops, forgot to include the substitutions that I copied.

EGGS
Applesauce: Use unsweetened applesauce as an egg replacement to ensure your pancakes aren't too sweet and to help you save calories. Simply replace eggs for 1/4 cup of applesauce.

Banana: Bananas are healthy and sweet. Use a banana to either replace eggs in pancakes or as the main ingredient in banana pancakes.

If you are out of eggs and need a substitute for a baking recipe, you can use mayonnaise. ... Measure 3 tablespoons of mayonnaise for each egg in your recipe. Mix the mayonnaise in with the wet ingredients thoroughly before combining wet and dry ingredients

Yes I would put an egg into pancake mix if I used pancake mixes. ... Some people don't bother with adding any eggs to the mix. Most people add a bit of shortening or oil to the flour before mixing it, but some people just fry the pancakes in butter or oil. A cup of flour will make somewhere around 8 medium size pancakes.

With little gluten, pancakes rely on eggs to provide the additional structure necessary to hold the bubbles and allow the pancake to rise. The fat in the yolk also provides richness and flavor. Too much egg, however, will make the pancake dense and custard-like; not enough will make it drier and more biscuit-like

To replace one egg when baking, spring for 1/4 cup of vegetable oil. It truly works like a charm. However, if you'll need more than one egg per recipe you'll want to try a different substitute for eggs. Using too much oil (even of the healthy variety) can make your recipe too oily or greasy.

   Applesauce. Applesauce is a purée made from cooked apples. Replace 1 egg with: 1/4 cup applesauce
   Mashed Banana. Mashed banana is another popular replacement for eggs. ...
   Ground Flaxseeds or Chia Seeds. ...
   Commercial Egg Replacer. ...
   Silken Tofu. ...
   Vinegar and Baking Soda - Replace 1 egg with: 1 teaspoon baking soda, 1 tablespoon vinegar
   Yogurt or Buttermilk.- Replace 1 egg with: 1/4 cup yogurt
   Arrowroot Powder.

1/4 cup of sweetened condensed milk is used to replace each egg in a recipe.

Without eggs, goods baked with flour or a standard baking mix will be a little more delicate, so you might consider leaving a cake in the pan instead of turning it out to serve it. ... The cake should pop out in one piece

MILK
In fact, the primary purpose of milk in your pancake recipe is to dissolve the flour and sugar and add structure, which means almost any liquid will do the trick. If your cupboards are bare, no need to worry, this pancake recipe uses water as the liquid base. [no recipe]

5 Tips for making the fluffiest pancakes

   Don't over mix the batter: Over-mixing can make your pancakes tough, stop mixing when you're batter has small lumps.
   Let the batter rest: Set the batter aside for 15-30 minutes (or even over-night). ...
   Separate & beat egg whites: This will make your pancakes fluffy & soufflé-like!
 
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I did not use eggs in baking for 10 years, and I can vouch for most of these subs!!
My go-tos were applesauce (or just a grated fresh apple) for sweet baked goods, and a "flax egg" for savories.

There is also the good old "egg replacer" (sold as Ener-G) which is baking powder plus a starch. This recipe adds guar/xanthan gum, which I never had (and it worked just fine). you mix it up into a slurry and add it to the recipe.
http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/egg-replacers/eggless-binder-powder
 
Anne Miller
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Thank you, Teresa

I have arrowroot and I have expired baking powder that I can test.  Would one of the baking powder substitute work?  Like baking soda and lemon juice?
 
Tereza Okava
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Honestly, Anne, if I were you I would use just the arrowroot (arrowroot is one of my favorite starches), but it depends on what you need it for.
It is important to think about whether you need a binder or a leavening agent.
For binders, starch, fruit, or mayo (great idea, i had never heard that) work well.
if you need a leavening agent, sour milk/yogurt/buttermilk plus a bit extra baking soda would probably work brilliantly.
In pancakes, I don't think you need the egg for rise, plus soured or buttermilk seems like a natural, so that is what I would go for!
 
Anne Miller
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Tereza, thanks for the help. Mainly for now, it is just pancakes from a mix.  When we were building our house, the mix made it simple and I have several boxes of it.

I bought yeast for the bread machine and I have a couple of packages of some kind of yeast that is in the freezer.

I have some cake mixes that might make life a little more pleasurable.  I see a lot of experiments ahead.
 
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When I was little and we were out of bread and milk, my mom would make Flapjacks. They are simply pancakes made with buttermilk and no eggs. I loved the chewy texture! Often we preferred them over pancakes.
 
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Aquafaba(the ''juice'' inside a can of chickpeas) is an excellent egg white substitute. You can even use it for meringues!
 
Tereza Okava
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Johan Thorbecke wrote:Aquafaba(the ''juice'' inside a can of chickpeas) is an excellent egg white substitute.


Also an excellent idea, and you use so little that it is not particularly beany-tasting.
If you live in a place where there are no canned chickpeas, like I do, keep in mind it is just the cook water, whether you cook them under pressure or not (obvs the more water you cook them in the less viscous the aquafaba will be). I never had great luck making marshmallows with aquafaba but it does make a nice sub for whipped egg whites if you need them to make something fluffy.
 
Anne Miller
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Carol Denton wrote:When I was little and we were out of bread and milk, my mom would make Flapjacks. They are simply pancakes made with buttermilk and no eggs. I loved the chewy texture! Often we preferred them over pancakes.



Thanks, Carol

I thought flapjacks was just another word for pancakes. Unfortunately, the recipes I found still use an egg.

Interestingly, Flapjacks in England are made from oats and are what I would call granola bars.



https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/86854/english-flapjack/
 
Anne Miller
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Johan Thorbecke wrote:Aquafaba(the ''juice'' inside a can of chickpeas) is an excellent egg white substitute. You can even use it for meringues!



Thanks for that tip!  I do have two cans of chickpeas.

I have lots of club soda, I wonder if that would work?  It makes the pancakes too fluffy so without the egg maybe it would be just right.  Our daughter was cleaning out old stuff and gave the club soda to me.
 
Tereza Okava
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that English flapjack thing looks a lot like an oatcake, and I am a big sucker for an oatcake. Thanks, I'll be baking these soon!!!

I am that person who can't remember the difference between seltzer, club soda, and sparkling water, so don't quote me on this, but i've seen recipes for quick bread that use some sort of carbonated beverage (including beer), so worth a shot.

Here are two pancake recipes I can thoroughly vouch for (I tested recipes for a cookbook written by this author at one point), one requires an egg substitute and the other doesn't. Feel free to replace anything you want with what you have (milks, sweeteners, etc), they will still work.
My personal preference is the first one, without an egg substitute. I live in a place with no maple syrup OR golden syrup, but I have used the same volume of molasses or brown sugar or white sugar. Just make sure that the texture is right, if you use dry sugar you may need to add a tiny bit more liquid.
http://www.ethicamagazine.com/recipes/isa-chandra-perfect-vegan-pancakes
https://www.theppk.com/2011/12/puffy-pillow-pancakes/

 
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Tapioca may be used in som cases, binds things together.
Also, I just bought online some dehydrated, organic eggs, in powder form. Haven't tried it yet, but could be very handy in some situations!
 
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If you have flax seed I would recommend a flax egg.  It gives you fiber and omega 3 and makes your pancakes have cute little "freckles"

My method is usually 3 heaping tablespoons in a blender ground to a flour consistency then add in 6 tablespoons of water, mix and let sit in fridge for 10min.  it gets the same volume and moisture content as an egg that way and can be used equivalently in most baking
 
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Most recipes I've seen for a flax egg use a 3:1 ratio water to ground flax but for breading (flour egg crumbs) I've found a 6:1 ratio works even better than real eggs. At least for breaded eggplant.
 
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Made a vegan quiche using chopped, frozen (thawed) swiss chard and onion.  The pie crust used refined coconut oil and a bit of vegan margarine and the onions and chard were sauteed in a bit of that margarine as well.  Once cooled a bit in the pan, the following mixture is added to the chard and onion:

1 c. non-dairy milk (I used oatmilk this time, but homemade nut milks work fine....in future I will probably up this to 1.5 c)
1/2 c. vegan 'mayonnaise'
1 teaspoon of nutritional yeast

....and as an egg replacer>>

1/4 c chickpea flour (possibly overkill)
1 teaspoon Himalayan black salt (sulfury kind)

After all ingredients mixed together with chard and onion, transfer to the pie shell and bake 45 min. at 360 deg. F.
VegQuiche.JPG
[Thumbnail for VegQuiche.JPG]
 
Tereza Okava
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chickpea flour makes great frittatta and scramble type things. Plus it's got lots of protein. I always keep some around, your quiche looks great!
 
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