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Gen Z Permies

 
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Last year I made a thread for Millennial permies. I recently found out that I’m actually on the cusp of being a millennial or generation Z. I’ve noticed some folks younger than me poking around the forums looking for friends and connections lately, so I thought I’d make this thread.


Please, feel free to introduce yourself, talk about your goals and aspirations, what resources or situations you’re looking for, etc!



Here's the other thread:

https://permies.com/t/101996/Millennial-Permies
 
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Hey James, thanks for posting this. I am definitely Gen Z as I was born in 1998. I am pretty much brand new to permaculture.

I learned about the state of our civilization and our planet around the end of last year and it shook me up quite a bit. For a few months I think I was depressed now that I look back on it now. My parents grew worried because I wasn't making all the dumb jokes I usually do and we eventually talked about it. From there I improved until I got to where I am today. Active Hope by Joanna Macy was and still is a big inspiration for me. "Hope is something you do, not something you have" she says. And she's right. The big change was going from waiting for humanity to do something to getting off my ass and doing something! I now consider myself a builder of whatever world follows this one. I see in my mind's eye of network of people fighting for our planet in diverse ways: some tell the story of ecological collapse or climate change, even if few listen. Others teach about how to survive and thrive in a changing world. Some fight to change or replace the corrupt systems that are in place now with something better. Many folks are getting to know local farmers, and starting to garden, and turning away from endless consumption. I see myself as just one tiny part of this growing network of people who are, in big or small ways, doing their part to love and protect our collective home. It's this thought that gets me out of bed in the morning and what drives me to do what I do.

As of now, I'm learning as much as I can about permaculture as possible. I am lined up to visit a permaculture homestead this summer and I am oh so excited to get my hands dirty and to soak up as much knowledge as I can. I hope some more folks respond to this thread, I am curious about how many younger folks there are out there.
 
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Generation Z, colloquially known as Zoomers, is the demographic cohort succeeding Millennials and preceding Generation Alpha. Researchers and popular media use the mid-to-late 1990s as starting birth years and the early 2010s as ending birth years. Wikipedia

^ I had to look that up 😁

Hello everyone my name is Silvanus but most folks call me Silas or si. My dream is to have a permaculture homestead somewhere. Meet someone special and raise a family while hopefully raising pastured livestock and fruits and vegetables. My biggest challenge is I live on a small acerage that is completely surrounded by conventional row crop ag fields so my little garden gets a ton of chemical drift. Hoping to move soon and maybe start wwoofing to gain exsperience. Can't wait to meet more of y'all!!!
 
Cam Haslehurst
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Silas Rempel wrote:Generation Z, colloquially known as Zoomers, is the demographic cohort succeeding Millennials and preceding Generation Alpha. Researchers and popular media use the mid-to-late 1990s as starting birth years and the early 2010s as ending birth years. Wikipedia

^ I had to look that up 😁

Hello everyone my name is Silvanus but most folks call me Silas or si. My dream is to have a permaculture homestead somewhere. Meet someone special and raise a family while hopefully raising pastured livestock and fruits and vegetables. My biggest challenge is I live on a small acerage that is completely surrounded by conventional row crop ag fields so my little garden gets a ton of chemical drift. Hoping to move soon and maybe start wwoofing to gain exsperience. Can't wait to meet more of y'all!!!



It sounds like you have pretty similar aspirations to my own! Whereabouts are you?
 
Silas Rempel
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Cam Haslehurst wrote:

Silas Rempel wrote:Generation Z, colloquially known as Zoomers, is the demographic cohort succeeding Millennials and preceding Generation Alpha. Researchers and popular media use the mid-to-late 1990s as starting birth years and the early 2010s as ending birth years. Wikipedia

^ I had to look that up 😁

Hello everyone my name is Silvanus but most folks call me Silas or si. My dream is to have a permaculture homestead somewhere. Meet someone special and raise a family while hopefully raising pastured livestock and fruits and vegetables. My biggest challenge is I live on a small acerage that is completely surrounded by conventional row crop ag fields so my little garden gets a ton of chemical drift. Hoping to move soon and maybe start wwoofing to gain exsperience. Can't wait to meet more of y'all!!!



It sounds like you have pretty similar aspirations to my own! Whereabouts are you?



Just north of Greenville Mississippi
 
Cam Haslehurst
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Silas Rempel wrote:

Cam Haslehurst wrote:

Silas Rempel wrote:Generation Z, colloquially known as Zoomers, is the demographic cohort succeeding Millennials and preceding Generation Alpha. Researchers and popular media use the mid-to-late 1990s as starting birth years and the early 2010s as ending birth years. Wikipedia

^ I had to look that up 😁

Hello everyone my name is Silvanus but most folks call me Silas or si. My dream is to have a permaculture homestead somewhere. Meet someone special and raise a family while hopefully raising pastured livestock and fruits and vegetables. My biggest challenge is I live on a small acerage that is completely surrounded by conventional row crop ag fields so my little garden gets a ton of chemical drift. Hoping to move soon and maybe start wwoofing to gain exsperience. Can't wait to meet more of y'all!!![/quote
It sounds like you have pretty similar aspirations to my own! Whereabouts are you?



Just north of Greenville Mississippi



Nowhere near me, but good to know there's another young person learning this stuff. Best of luck to you Silas.

 
Silas Rempel
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Cam Haslehurst wrote:

Silas Rempel wrote:

Cam Haslehurst wrote:

Silas Rempel wrote:Generation Z, colloquially known as Zoomers, is the demographic cohort succeeding Millennials and preceding Generation Alpha. Researchers and popular media use the mid-to-late 1990s as starting birth years and the early 2010s as ending birth years. Wikipedia

^ I had to look that up 😁

Hello everyone my name is Silvanus but most folks call me Silas or si. My dream is to have a permaculture homestead somewhere. Meet someone special and raise a family while hopefully raising pastured livestock and fruits and vegetables. My biggest challenge is I live on a small acerage that is completely surrounded by conventional row crop ag fields so my little garden gets a ton of chemical drift. Hoping to move soon and maybe start wwoofing to gain exsperience. Can't wait to meet more of y'all!!![/quote
It sounds like you have pretty similar aspirations to my own! Whereabouts are you?



Just north of Greenville Mississippi



Nowhere near me, but good to know there's another young person learning this stuff. Best of luck to you Silas.



The same to you! God bless!!

 
James Landreth
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Cam Haslehurst wrote:Hey James, thanks for posting this. I am definitely Gen Z as I was born in 1998. I am pretty much brand new to permaculture.

I learned about the state of our civilization and our planet around the end of last year and it shook me up quite a bit. For a few months I think I was depressed now that I look back on it now. My parents grew worried because I wasn't making all the dumb jokes I usually do and we eventually talked about it. From there I improved until I got to where I am today. Active Hope by Joanna Macy was and still is a big inspiration for me. "Hope is something you do, not something you have" she says. And she's right. The big change was going from waiting for humanity to do something to getting off my ass and doing something! I now consider myself a builder of whatever world follows this one. I see in my mind's eye of network of people fighting for our planet in diverse ways: some tell the story of ecological collapse or climate change, even if few listen. Others teach about how to survive and thrive in a changing world. Some fight to change or replace the corrupt systems that are in place now with something better. Many folks are getting to know local farmers, and starting to garden, and turning away from endless consumption. I see myself as just one tiny part of this growing network of people who are, in big or small ways, doing their part to love and protect our collective home. It's this thought that gets me out of bed in the morning and what drives me to do what I do.

As of now, I'm learning as much as I can about permaculture as possible. I am lined up to visit a permaculture homestead this summer and I am oh so excited to get my hands dirty and to soak up as much knowledge as I can. I hope some more folks respond to this thread, I am curious about how many younger folks there are out there.




They're out there, for sure (younger permaculture and activists in general)

I know a big challenge for our generation is access to land. But we've been coming up with all sorts of solutions to that across the board. Some people practice responsible guerilla planting. I volunteer to help religious groups set up food forests and pollinator gardens. Every bit helps, for sure. I've been so lucky to see as much progress as I have

I just want you all to know that you're not alone, and that there is hope, and that younger people like you have a seat at the table.
 
pollinator
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2002 here in north FL. Exploring human rewilding and natural farming.
 
master pollinator
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I'm far removed from your generation, but I'm happy to see that there are people your age interested in permaculture/homesteading/making the world a better place.  Thanks for that.
 
Cam Haslehurst
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James Landreth wrote:

Cam Haslehurst wrote:Hey James, thanks for posting this. I am definitely Gen Z as I was born in 1998. I am pretty much brand new to permaculture.

I learned about the state of our civilization and our planet around the end of last year and it shook me up quite a bit. For a few months I think I was depressed now that I look back on it now. My parents grew worried because I wasn't making all the dumb jokes I usually do and we eventually talked about it. From there I improved until I got to where I am today. Active Hope by Joanna Macy was and still is a big inspiration for me. "Hope is something you do, not something you have" she says. And she's right. The big change was going from waiting for humanity to do something to getting off my ass and doing something! I now consider myself a builder of whatever world follows this one. I see in my mind's eye of network of people fighting for our planet in diverse ways: some tell the story of ecological collapse or climate change, even if few listen. Others teach about how to survive and thrive in a changing world. Some fight to change or replace the corrupt systems that are in place now with something better. Many folks are getting to know local farmers, and starting to garden, and turning away from endless consumption. I see myself as just one tiny part of this growing network of people who are, in big or small ways, doing their part to love and protect our collective home. It's this thought that gets me out of bed in the morning and what drives me to do what I do.

As of now, I'm learning as much as I can about permaculture as possible. I am lined up to visit a permaculture homestead this summer and I am oh so excited to get my hands dirty and to soak up as much knowledge as I can. I hope some more folks respond to this thread, I am curious about how many younger folks there are out there.




They're out there, for sure (younger permaculture and activists in general)

I know a big challenge for our generation is access to land. But we've been coming up with all sorts of solutions to that across the board. Some people practice responsible guerilla planting. I volunteer to help religious groups set up food forests and pollinator gardens. Every bit helps, for sure. I've been so lucky to see as much progress as I have

I just want you all to know that you're not alone, and that there is hope, and that younger people like you have a seat at the table.



It's comforting to hear that. Following covid I am very excited to get started in some permaculture events. Maybe when I get a car I can even visit Wheaton Labs! It looks like an amazing place.

I'm far removed from your generation, but I'm happy to see that there are people your age interested in permaculture/homesteading/making the world a better place.  Thanks for that.



Like James said, we're out there! And I think the numbers are only going to grow.
 
pollinator
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James Landreth wrote:

Cam Haslehurst wrote:Hey James, thanks for posting this. I am definitely Gen Z as I was born in 1998. I am pretty much brand new to permaculture.

I learned about the state of our civilization and our planet around the end of last year and it shook me up quite a bit. For a few months I think I was depressed now that I look back on it now. My parents grew worried because I wasn't making all the dumb jokes I usually do and we eventually talked about it. From there I improved until I got to where I am today. Active Hope by Joanna Macy was and still is a big inspiration for me. "Hope is something you do, not something you have" she says. And she's right. The big change was going from waiting for humanity to do something to getting off my ass and doing something! I now consider myself a builder of whatever world follows this one. I see in my mind's eye of network of people fighting for our planet in diverse ways: some tell the story of ecological collapse or climate change, even if few listen. Others teach about how to survive and thrive in a changing world. Some fight to change or replace the corrupt systems that are in place now with something better. Many folks are getting to know local farmers, and starting to garden, and turning away from endless consumption. I see myself as just one tiny part of this growing network of people who are, in big or small ways, doing their part to love and protect our collective home. It's this thought that gets me out of bed in the morning and what drives me to do what I do.

As of now, I'm learning as much as I can about permaculture as possible. I am lined up to visit a permaculture homestead this summer and I am oh so excited to get my hands dirty and to soak up as much knowledge as I can. I hope some more folks respond to this thread, I am curious about how many younger folks there are out there.




They're out there, for sure (younger permaculture and activists in general)

I know a big challenge for our generation is access to land. But we've been coming up with all sorts of solutions to that across the board. Some people practice responsible guerilla planting. I volunteer to help religious groups set up food forests and pollinator gardens. Every bit helps, for sure. I've been so lucky to see as much progress as I have



agreed -access to land is a big hurdle, for sure, rising costs of land, and the rising inflation compared to wage stagnation for decades. it was an issues for me when i was younger, and continues to be, and sadly its only gotten that much exponentially worse, not better in my time.

some thoughts - obvious ones are community, co housing, land share...more autonomy and sovereignty than a proper "commune" ...not all in one pot.

maybe not as obvious - team up with older people. there can be some win wins here, older people have land and experience to share, but not as much strength and stamina, younger people need to learn and lack land. small scale or more intense...but even small exchanges...like keeping up some ones gardens for gleanings, or they let you use the space to grow if you kick down part of harvest...with like your neighbors...or even work small landscape gigs that turn into more potential like land share or work trades ...or even co housing with elder couple...that sort of thing.
 
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I'm not Gen Z, but I have a follow up question for the "Zoomers" out there, since land access is always such a hot topic around the forums.

Often, people ask "how much to buy an acre of land" etc.  Well, I know Zoomers are just starting out, so buying outright would be tough.  And the types of land and activities likely vary.  So I'd like to ask the Gen Z types:

How much is renting land worth to you on a monthly (or yearly) basis, as a young permie?

For instance:
-How far would you be willing to drive to have a practice plot for farming/gardening/woodlot access/mushroom growing/tree planting/permie practice stuff?
-How much would you pay to rent for a month or year?
-What amenities or infrastructure would be essential?
-What amenities would be "nice to haves"?
-What situations result in a "no go" or red flag?

For example:
"I'd drive X hours away, and pay $Y dollars a month, for the opportunity to practice Z activity, as long as condition A is met.  B would be really nice, but C is a deal breaker for me!"
 
pollinator
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I’m from 1993, so technically just a bit too old to be considered Gen Z, but somehow I don’t feel very millennial either, haha.
Buying property is definitely the biggest problem I see among my peers. But I also see a bunch of young people using their knowledge and ease within the digital world to their advantage.
Europe has a lot of countries where rural properties in abandoned regions (in favour of the great move towards the cities in search for jobs) are up for grabs for very interesting prices. $25000 for a simple house (with some much needed work) and a few acres is no exception in these regions. But there’s little to no work for people who hope to be given work. There’s already a more interesting scene for self employed people willing to create work and set up a new market in a place where they have little competition. And even more ease for people who can work from home as long as there is internet.
My husband and I have been very fortunate to fall in the latter category, which allowed us to move from our home country to Italy (where property is cheaper and the nature is much more undisturbed in regards to our home country); and managed to acquire our first property here in a Italy last year for a mere fraction of the cost that we would have paid for a property like this back in our country. The fact that the property doesn’t have direct access to the main road made it undesirable to many Italians, but didn’t make a difference to us as we don’t have to leave the property often anyways.
We are so looking forward to starting our lives and a family on this new property (Moving in next February!).
The way I see it, young people who want to set up a digital work-from-home situation, and are willing to move countries and learn a new language, really can have their pick from some of the most beautiful properties (I’ve seen entire abandoned villages in the middle of the forest, old vineyards and even small abandoned castles listed for affordable prices), for a price that would allow them minimal need for a loan, allowing them to be financially independent sooner rather then later.

The only downside to our situation is that we do miss the friends and family we left behind in our home countries, so we always plan for one or two trips a year to go back and visit them.
Any plans we make for the farm we want to set up on this new property will have to accommodate the possibility of us leaving it for a week.
 
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