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Going Shoeless: A discussion about barefoot living

 
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I love going barefoot in my yard. When we bought our property there was goat heads (stickers) all over our yard. It took about 3 years to eradicate them by pulling them up by the roots, but they are all gone now. So I am able to go barefoot in the yard and love going in my garden barefoot.
 
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I watched Clint Ober's documentary about Grounding or Earthing years ago and in summer I take off my shoes when in the grass. I made my own grounding mat using copper for indoor use while sitting at my desk but I wonder if it works. This thread encourages me to be brave and take small steps walking outside while being careful not to step on glass shards, prickly things, rocks, dog poop and other nasty things.

I've looked at "grounding" shoes online but they are quite expensive.
 
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Location: SF bay area zone 10a
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How do you correct a one sided problem?



Often a one-sided problem is due to an asymmetrical holding pattern in the pelvis or an old knee or ankle injury on one side that creates an uneven gait. Working with a bodyworker or PT or chiropractor to resolve the old pattern will help rebalance your gait so your feet take the stress evenly. We can do some of this ourselves, but we are so accustomed to our old patterns that they can be hard to see, and working with someone else can provide not only support for the process but also a vision of ourself that doesn't arise from our own personal history. And I'll say again what everyone else is saying: Take it slow, be gentle with your feet and care for them through the process.
 
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Alexandra Clark wrote:For cramps and plantar fasciatis, using magnesium oil massaged right into the soles of the feet and then let it dry (it isn't really an oil, but does feel oily) helps tremendously==it helps the area relax.



Magnesium oil is critical, I think for everyone and not just the feet (but yeah: definitely great for the feet!)

Caroline Dean's "The Magnesium Miracle" covers most of the salient arguments. Google it.

A few points:

Don't use epsom salts (for anything) unless you know the source. Most magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) is taken directly from the wood processing industry and almost certainly polluted.

Magnesium chloride (MgCl) makes the best "oil". Great for baths too. Don't buy expensive liquids, just get a bag online or from your favorite health store (sometimes called "dead sea salts" - check the label) and dissolve in hot fresh water 1:1 or more. Use a bottle of commercial RO if you don't have a good well.

Freshly washed warm feet absorb best, but I regularly douse my whole body once or twice a day. You would not believe how much it helps allergies, digestion, cramps, etc. Magnesium is critical to almost everything we do and almost nobody gets enough.

It can itch, although you quickly get used to it. Rinse off after 20 minutes or so if it's bad, and you will still absorb plenty (hundreds of times more than oral supplements). I find a bit of any reasonable ointment quickly clears the itching if you can stand to leave the oil on to fully absorb.

Consider potassium (K) supplements as well (K pills or powder digest and absorb well, where Mg likely won't). Every cell needs magnesium, potassium, and sodium, and quite a lot of each. You probably get enough sodium, but the rest are dependent on diet and of course our soil is so depleted...

~r
 
pollinator
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Location: Suffolk County, Long Island NY
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Alexandra Clark wrote:As soon as the temperature goes about 50 I am barefoot unless driving or in a store. IN NY you can't go into a store without them.

Being barefoot also allows the body to ground...rubber soles do not make the connection with the negative ions of the earth--it is really healthy to "earth" or "ground" and can help with pain.

For cramps and plantar fasciatis, using magnesium oil massaged right into the soles of the feet and then let it dry (it isn't really an oil, but does feel oily) helps tremendously==it helps the area relax.

My only issue with bare feet is forgetting to wash my feet before going to bed after gardening-LOL yeah I can't tell you how many times I got my sheets all gross because of this. LMAO!!!



Hey, fellow Long Islander!
I have completely flat feet.  From childhood to about 10 years ago I was barefoot as much as possible.  Now I am shod in Merrells & Birkenstocks, and my orthotics are my best friends.  No low back pain, no more hip bursitis, and as a bonus NO DOG POOP BETWEN THE TOES!  
 
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Location: Kalapuya Land, West of Cascades (600' elevation; 44°N. Lat.) Sandy/Silty Soil
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I Love to be barefoot as much as possible.
As a child I couldn't wait until summer time came so I could ditch the shoes.
It took a lot of learning to not stub my toes and get stung all the time.

When I was a young man, I used to be all ferocious about it- running barefoot in the city in the winter and doing everything barefoot.
Keeping a box of gravel inside to walk in place to keep my callouses strong during wintertime.
Then occasionally my toes would go numb randomly, so I don't do that anymore.

In mild to warm weather  I am barefoot on the farm.  
I am frequently getting thorns, stickers and the like in my feet, but I don't mind much.
But if I'm working in an area with a bunch of spikey stuff I put on some muckboots or something.
I have some croc shoes that are worn thin with holes in the bottom that protect my feet somewhat.... and I get partial grounding through the hole in the sole.
They are easy to kick off in a moments notice to free my feet.

I am shod when I work in the town, but as soon as I get home the shoes come off, as well as about 52% of the town-stress.
Tender feet get tough if you let them.
 
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Ellen Lewis wrote:

How do you correct a one sided problem?



Often a one-sided problem is due to an asymmetrical holding pattern in the pelvis or an old knee or ankle injury on one side that creates an uneven gait. Working with a bodyworker or PT or chiropractor to resolve the old pattern will help rebalance your gait so your feet take the stress evenly. We can do some of this ourselves, but we are so accustomed to our old patterns that they can be hard to see, and working with someone else can provide not only support for the process but also a vision of ourself that doesn't arise from our own personal history. And I'll say again what everyone else is saying: Take it slow, be gentle with your feet and care for them through the process.



Just noticed the post, thanks. Strangely enough I did break my ankle and I have screws in from back about a decade ago. It is the same ankle/foot which always seems to give the problem. Never would have thought about that causing any kind of problems.
 
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I found a very effective way to eliminate the goats head seeds on my 1/4 acre property in CA. I paid my grandkids a penny each for them. They wore foamy flip flops and soon discovered the most profitable places to tramp. Over all, I paid out about $20 the first year and $5 the second year and after that goatsheads were few and far between.
 
You'll never get away with this you overconfident blob! The most you will ever get is this tiny ad:
Thank you & 30% off everything in the nursery!
https://permies.com/t/181445/perennial-vegetables/nursery
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