• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

How's Your Weather?  RSS feed

 
Roberto pokachinni
pollinator
Posts: 1442
Location: Fraser Headwaters, B.C., Zone3, Latitude 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
101
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi hugelkultur solar trees woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Presently 0 degrees C.  I got a text from a friend that he was picking nettles on Texata Island the other day... so R Ranson, spring is close for you. 

Not so much for me... Could be a least a month before I see nettles.  Though it has been above freezing and raining the last few days... there is a lot of snow still to go.  I can't wait to hear the ice go on the creek and hear all the mountain snow melt come down.  It's a beautiful sound.  Right now, the creek is small, mostly frozen, and barely exposed anywhere under the snow and ice. 

The fresh rain on the snow the last few days has allowed for some great animal tracking.  Three different cougars on the land this week!  The large one, probably the male, has prints 6 inches across! He's probably 200+ pounds. Spooky.  Don't want that pussy cat on my back! The other tracks are a medium sized female and cub.  The female is likely a force to be reckoned with on her own, fortunately there is no place for me to mistakenly corner her or likely get between her and her cub.  By great fortune, these meat eaters tend to be shy and skittish around humans.  I have yet to see one on my property, but they are here every year.    
 
Liz Hoxie
Posts: 226
Location: Ellisforde, WA
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You're right in a way. "Modern" varieties of iris contain early, midseason, late, and rebloomers. Fortunately, I have the old-style purple iris. The Florentine iris that is used for orris root have the same bloom time.
 
Annie Lochte
Posts: 67
Location: The Ocala National Forest. Florida, USA
3
chicken forest garden goat
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well. After a mild winter, finally some regular precip the azaleas have bloomed and the flowers are done, the leaves everywere are coming on strong... Got corn, beans, cukes, squash, tomatoes, an more coming up...  we are getting our coldest temps so far this winter tonite.... :/. Got a big load of wood for the stove yesterday, and about to go out and cover up what I can... Calling for 26* in my county but where i am is usually a few degrees warmer.... Hope so this time as well.....
 
Lou Boyle
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We had a taste of unseasonable record-breaking warmth, then stretch of single digit temps (Fahrenheit), then a noreaster worth 20 hours in a plow truck, now we'll get a stretch of subfreezing temps.

No worries, I'm confident it'll all melt by Memorial Day.
Screenshot_20170316-043629.png
[Thumbnail for Screenshot_20170316-043629.png]
forecast
 
Leona Dubois
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Gilbert Fritz wrote:So what's up with the weather on the West coast?
It is the same here in central Saskatchewan...we just got 2 feet of the white stuff a week or so ago and -30C weather (-22F) until 2 days ago snow in the forecast for the next couple days....
 
Josephine Howland
Posts: 37
Location: White Mountains of New Hampshire zone 5
2
books dog hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We are in the White Mountains of NH.  White is for snow!  We got between 18-24" on Tuesday, and are still snowed in!  Both our plow truck and snow blower saw the snow and died.  I just had to cancel a Drs. appointment for my 89 yo mom.  There is just no way to get out. Anyone near by with a plow will be welcomed.  HHHEEEEELLLLPPPPP!!!
 
Kirk Schonfeldt
Posts: 34
Location: South-central Iowa
2
bee bike chicken forest garden fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Robins came back a week ago in our neck of the woods and some forsythias are in full-bloom. NOT hopeful for peaches this year, darned February heat-wave.

Tyler Ludens wrote:Turkey Vultures have returned.


The vultures aren't year-round residents there? Were around Houston. They aren't the prettiest birds, but still one of my favorites. Known for their carrion-eating, but excellent hunters as well.
 
Gilbert Fritz
pollinator
Posts: 1346
Location: Denver, CO
25
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It is going to be 78 degrees here today, and 80 by the weekend. With two more months of frost danger left, and all the trees budding, this is rather unfortunate, though pleasant, and useful for getting a lot of work done.

It also makes it difficult to establish spring crops; and I don't dare start summer crops yet.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9742
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
184
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The Turkey Vultures seem to move out of the area during the winter, or at least are not as prevalent.  The Black Vultures are year-round residents.
 
Ben Zumeta
Posts: 202
Location: Redwood Country, Zone 9, 60" rain/yr,
9
dog duck hugelkultur
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well done Roberto, if you have a pinnacle predator on your property that you can just feel lucky to see signs of you are a highly evolved human being and permie of the highest order.

Here in redwood country in NW CA we've seen over 80" of rain since Oct 1st. Some places are over 100". We have had at least a dozen 2" days. It's getting old! On the other hand, with all the crazy weather you all are dealing with it still seems like slow pitch softball living here if I don't float away. It's comforting to be where 2000yr old trees tell you it hasn't gotten above 100f or below 18f in the soil in their lifetime. I strongly encourage permies retire from the big leagues of desert permaculture and come down to the beer league  that is growing stuff in Northern California.
 
Liz Hoxie
Posts: 226
Location: Ellisforde, WA
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The plants that are in a "holding pattern" are making progress SLOWLY. I planted the garlic today even though the forsythia hasn't bloomed.
One of the goats who is going to kid has looked like she's going to deliver any minute has been looking like that for almost a week. Another doe has been looking like she was close for the last couple of days. Both are finally deveoping an udder FAST.
I think spring is going to be here soon.
 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 6708
Location: Left Coast Canada
845
books chicken cooking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How's my weather?

Basically, most of the last month has been early March weather, but this last week, we had late February weather.

Each morning I get up, look at the weather report and see that it's going to return to normal temperatures by the end of the day.  Sunny, light clouds, all that stuff.  Each day it is overcast, cold, and wet.  I think the weather report people could do with a window.

Instead of harvesting snap peas in Feb and Mar like a normal year, here it is the middle of May and the peas aren't even knee high. 

I planted my tomatoes out a few weeks later than normal, well past our last frost date, and it went down to 3 degrees C a couple of nights later (forecast low of 12C so I didn't cover them) and killed half of them.

I'm getting a bit tired of winter here. 
 
Gilbert Fritz
pollinator
Posts: 1346
Location: Denver, CO
25
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's snowing here.
 
Deb Rebel
garden master
Posts: 1802
Location: Zone 6b
187
books cat fish food preservation greening the desert solar trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We were typical spring tracking (two months of fairly civil and about 3 good dips/freezes/bit of snow that can take the fruit blooms and sets off the trees) then I had to go north at end of April for family. We got hit with a New Year's (level 50 year blizzard) storm that broke out all the trees and trashed everything. I came home to disaster. Oh the power went off over most of the REC for a day and a half, they were originally expecting six days out... Spouse had all my bedding plants to deal with.

We hit frost date and usually the weather saves a last hurrah, but for 11 years we had ONE anomaly, which was snow on  the morning two days after, which was warm snow and melted and I'd covered because of warnings of cold. I am facing tomorrow with upper 30's after I started plantout. Here you subtract five from the projected low if it's low forties or colder so I will have to break out every cover I can find. Sigh. I really needed this NOT!!!

Only plus is the expensive eating pear in the front yard that went straight up and never set, got the branches permanently bent out. Which should improve it setting and producing, I'm told. I will give it one more year before I pull it (planted 2006, it did finally set a few fruit last year it shed about 2 weeks later) or we shall see what 2018 brings. Else I will be seasoning up some pear wood and make spoons.
 
Kyle Neath
pollinator
Posts: 164
Location: High Sierras, CA 6400'
33
dog hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Still waiting for the snow to melt here. Last year the road was clear save a couple drifts only a few inches deep. Just hiked out this past weekend and there's still four to five feet of snow in a few places. Sounds like I'm gonna get some practice clearing snow with the backhoe if I ever want to be able to drive in supplies. Thankfully it looks like we're gonna get some warming here the next few weeks. I hope it sticks so I can find my soil and plant some trees out soon!
IMG_2862.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2862.jpg]
One very buried snowcat... in May
IMG_2840.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2840.jpg]
No need to worry about gates when you can walk over 'em
 
Nicole Alderman
garden master
Posts: 1718
Location: Pacific Northwest
267
cat duck forest garden hugelkultur cooking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
r ranson wrote:How's my weather?

Basically, most of the last month has been early March weather, but this last week, we had late February weather.

Each morning I get up, look at the weather report and see that it's going to return to normal temperatures by the end of the day.  Sunny, light clouds, all that stuff.  Each day it is overcast, cold, and wet.  I think the weather report people could do with a window.

Instead of harvesting snap peas in Feb and Mar like a normal year, here it is the middle of May and the peas aren't even knee high. 

I planted my tomatoes out a few weeks later than normal, well past our last frost date, and it went down to 3 degrees C a couple of nights later (forecast low of 12C so I didn't cover them) and killed half of them.

I'm getting a bit tired of winter here. 


Yikes! You guys up there have really been getting hit hard this spring! Down here it's just been eternally dreary, pretty much endless cloudy and rainy days (seriously there's been like 5 sunny days since October). There's thankfully been no frosts, but everything is growing slowly. My lilacs are just now starting to open their buds, as are my native roses. My rhodi hasn't bloomed yet, either. I usually have all of those ready to pick for May Day! I also usually have salmonberries ripe by now. Supposedly we've got a week of sunny/non-rainy 70-80 F weather coming up, so I have a feeling everything is going to ripen and grow like crazy, especially the weeds!
 
Ben Zumeta
Posts: 202
Location: Redwood Country, Zone 9, 60" rain/yr,
9
dog duck hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Fort Dick's first boner forecast of the season! 65-70 every day for the next week. Of course, I just pulled my groin right when its finally dry enough to dig.
Filename: 7-Day-Forecast-for-Latitude-41.86-N-and-Longitude-124.15-W-(Elev.pdf
Description: Fort Dick
File size: 141 Kbytes
 
Joseph Lofthouse
garden master
Posts: 2618
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
507
bee chicken food preservation fungi greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
About a week ago, my weather switched from spring/winter to summer. So I've been crazy busy planting the warm weather crops this week. I have about two more planting days to do. They'll have to be next week, since tomorrow is pick for market day, Saturday is market day, and Sunday is my day to recover from the previous two days of frantic effort. That's OK, my goal for having planting done is June 5th, so I'm right on schedule.

There will be very little fruit this year, since the fruit trees got frozen multiple times.

summer-sunset-wellsville-mountains.jpg
[Thumbnail for summer-sunset-wellsville-mountains.jpg]
Forecast: Clear and Sunny until September!
 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 6708
Location: Left Coast Canada
845
books chicken cooking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Average rainfall for June, less than one mm.
Rainfall in the last twelve hours, one inch.

Summer came for three days last month and then left.  Looks like march or October outside.
 
Thyri Gullinvargr
gardener
Posts: 398
Location: Wisconsin, USA Zone 4b-5a
86
books cat dog toxin-ectomy urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We've been about 10 degrees (Fahrenheit) above average for the last week or so.
 
Deb Rebel
garden master
Posts: 1802
Location: Zone 6b
187
books cat fish food preservation greening the desert solar trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can we say frying? This is our late July weather. If you want to do anything outside it is rise before the sun, quit by 10 am to hide, then pray you can do the last hour before sunset and feed your mosquitos too (trying to find the one thing that still has water in it) Single digit humidity and peeled sun and close to 100f. Going to be a long hot summer.
 
Annie Lochte
Posts: 67
Location: The Ocala National Forest. Florida, USA
3
chicken forest garden goat
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Finally getting rain here... A couple inches last week slow and easy rains, then last evening came a toad strangler... It overflowed my rain gauges but the 5gal bucket I set out has over 6" in it. The lightning was close and intense and nonstop and lasted for the entire 90 min the rain poured down... Much of my topsoil is now down in the lowest corner of the homestead... The front gate area... Where there's a patch of bananas growing. The few visitors that I do get often comment on how big the bananas grow here... I've populated several areas of the county with that patch of bananas over the years... It's good to be over the extreme fire danger we were in.... and replenishing our aquifer.... May had many 95+ * and low humidity days, so far June is more normal 84-92* days and very humid...
 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 6708
Location: Left Coast Canada
845
books chicken cooking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The winter broke records for cold and snowfall.  The spring broke records for rainfall.  The summer is breaking records for heat and poor air quality from the forest fire smog. 

The fires are hundreds of miles away, I'm told, and our sky is a dirty, almost muddy colour that turns the sun orange.  I can't imagine how bad it must be closer to the fires.  Sending good thoughts for all the people affected by them. 
 
Jarret Hynd
Posts: 88
Location: Sask, Canada - Zone 3b
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This last Winter was the warmest one I can ever recall. We'd go from +5'C one day, to -20 or -30'C within 2 or 3 days, and because the snow had melted away in December, many people around here lost perennials in their yards - my garlic certainly produced poorly.

Fast-Forward several months, and we finally just had our first rain today which broke the 80-90 day dry streak this Summer. (August was basically 25'c to 33'c everyday)

Here's hoping that the Fall weather will be more cooperative
 
Steven Kovacs
Posts: 227
Location: Western Massachusetts (USDA zone 5a, heating zone 5, 40"+)
9
urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Spring was cold and wet.  Summer was cold and wet.  Now that fall is supposed to be here, it finally feels like summer (highs in the 80s, lows in the 60s).  Still, we did better than most of the continent in terms of weather this year - I'd rather be too cool than too hot.  And the peaches rebounded from last year's crop failure to be ridiculously prolific, literally raining off the trees with the slightest breeze.
 
Stacy Witscher
Posts: 113
Location: SF Bay Area
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Winter and spring were rainy, too rainy. Summer was/is too hot. We are going to get air conditioning for next summer, because I just have such a hard time with heat. I'm looking forward to cool weather, but it looks like our fall will be delayed until November. Such is life.
 
Annie Lochte
Posts: 67
Location: The Ocala National Forest. Florida, USA
3
chicken forest garden goat
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Today 9/14 is hot (91*an no electricity) an dry so far. Last Sunday/Monday Irma brought her 80mph winds and enough rain to fill a 20gal muck bucket full to over flowing. I dumped the rain gauge twice at 4" then winds got to fierce to go out in the dark. My place only has a bit of water puddled in the lowest place but the flooding is evident everywhere. Tuesday 9/12 the morning low was 64* which was nice but the humidity creeping up now and the sweat doesn't evaporate and it's hot! Luckily myself, my animals and my home have no apparent lasting damage, just several truckloads of tree debris and a couple crushed fences from neighboring trees... I'm estimating 15-20" rain.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
master steward
Posts: 4257
Location: Missoula, MT
410
books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur toxin-ectomy
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Today, mid September, it is raining, sweet, sweet rain here in Montana after a looong fire season with dangerously smoky air, and record heat and dryness.

Not my picture, but the smell is wonderful.



 
Mark Tudor
Posts: 80
Location: SoCal USA
9
bike cat dog tiny house trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I seriously miss that smell in southern California. We had some rain last week according to the local weather stations my neighbors have; we totaled 0.1 inch. Over the next 5 months we will get another 10-11 inches. I go stand in the back yard every day when it rains. I miss experiencing 4 seasons.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
garden master
Posts: 2618
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
507
bee chicken food preservation fungi greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The arrival of fall is right on schedule for my place. A prolonged rain fell overnight. I expect frost by morning. So yesterday was the last of our summer weather. Tomorrow is the start of our fall weather.
 
Deb Rebel
garden master
Posts: 1802
Location: Zone 6b
187
books cat fish food preservation greening the desert solar trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Our fall is being hot. It is 'fair week' and the County Fair is going and usually around Thursday we get cold socked in rain and the heat of summer breaks and you have to start worrying about frost. No such luck this year. Right now we're still getting low 90's F highs and upper 50's F lows. 91f at 4 pm (translating for savings time and we're so far over in zone) is about 2 pm in most places so close to our daily high.

It does give me about 2-3 more weeks before I have to worry about bringing in the houseplants and the pails of peppers that will be wintering.  Have to spruce up the grow lights again and turn a corner of the living room into the 'Hooker Lounge Happy Hour' with the red/blue LED's giving that 'glow' to things... where am I going to put over a dozen 4' high pepper plants (in their pails, easily that big).
 
Faren Leader
Posts: 12
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Willamette Valley, Oregon-- Spring was wet and cool, summer has been HOT HOT and dry, terrible wildfires, and now in the span of a week it's changed over from 90s and sunny, to mid-upper 70s and sunny (now), to low 60s and rain for several days (forecasted starting Sunday).

Overnight temps have also dropped dramatically from low 60s overnight a week or two ago, to mid-upper 40s last night. I expect my peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, summer squash and cucumbers will start looking sad soon, especially with the cooling overnights AND the upcoming rain.
 
Kyle Neath
pollinator
Posts: 164
Location: High Sierras, CA 6400'
33
dog hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Fall is coming at us fast. After an entire summer of +10-15˚ above average, we're diving 5-10˚ below average starting… today. Should get our first frost tomorrow morning and the first dusting of snow in the high country next week. Still lots of snow up in Desolation from last winter too. Amazing to see snow stick around all season after the terrible snowpacks 2011-2016. I'm excited for the winter and a bit overwhelmed at the work I have to do before the snow starts piling up. Gonna be a busy couple months!
 
Deb Rebel
garden master
Posts: 1802
Location: Zone 6b
187
books cat fish food preservation greening the desert solar trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yesterday, Thursday, high in the low 50's F, and socked in with fog/mist or rain ALL day. Low mid 40's. Perfect PAC-NW weather... Monday will be 80 then the decline to freezing at night begins. So this signals my 'get the house ready for invasion of houseplants and peppers' and starting to take out plants at the end of their production. What's getting me is the tomatoes are FINALLY putting on.
 
Hans Quistorff
pollinator
Posts: 791
Location: Longbranch, WA
46
chicken goat rabbit solar tiny house wofati
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Monday will be 80 then the decline to freezing at night begins. So this signals my 'get the house ready for invasion of houseplants and peppers' and starting to take out plants at the end of their production. What's getting me is the tomatoes are FINALLY putting on.

That is why I plant my tomatoes, peppers and basil in wicking barrels.  I just finished repairing my greenhouse so the barrels are moving in now and will produce for at least another month.
The warm temperatures came at just the right time to take all the windows down and replace the rotten wood;
 
Roberto pokachinni
pollinator
Posts: 1442
Location: Fraser Headwaters, B.C., Zone3, Latitude 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
101
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi hugelkultur solar trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's been snowing off and on for the past few days and it's staying on the ground (about 4 inches) with no sign of letting up anytime soon by the forecast (some daily highs of 8 or 9C but nights in the minus 3 or 4C range, with rain and snow and sleet on the list.  This is at least a couple weeks earlier than I've ever seen it here before.  Last year we didn't get snow until into December (but that was rare too).  Usually we get snow on the valley bottom on Halloween, but it was Oct 9th when this started.  The leaves are still on the bloody poplar trees!    I still haven't planted my garlic.    Looks like i might be planting it in a sleet storm this year. 
 
Jarret Hynd
Posts: 88
Location: Sask, Canada - Zone 3b
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Roberto, almost exactly the same over here. Poplars/Birch just finished dropping, Elms dropped half and Willows are still green. We had a snow warning yesterday and I figure with all the frost lately "it was time", but luckily it missed us. *knock on wood*

I took some time the last month and a half to really reevaluate things. The late frost 2 days before june 1st, the level of heat and no rain for 90 days this summer, the 5 days in a row of hard frost we got at the start of September...I have a lot of infrastructure to build this winter to try to mitigate this wonky weather next year.

I missed planting a 1/4 acre of rye this year, but there's always next year. As for the garlic, I plan on doing that today. Good luck with yours
 
Roberto pokachinni
pollinator
Posts: 1442
Location: Fraser Headwaters, B.C., Zone3, Latitude 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
101
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi hugelkultur solar trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As for the garlic, I plan on doing that today. Good luck with yours 
I might take a chance on waiting for a thawed day in November to plant the garlic, if the snow goes away.  Any day the snow is gone and the ground isn't frozen, I will plant.  I'd like to get it done this month.  I have hundreds of cloves to plant.
 
Taryn Hesse
Posts: 66
Location: Rainy Cold Temperate Harz Mountains Germany 450m South Facing River Valley
5
bike food preservation forest garden solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
warm and rainy  under 10 c at night. We will get some sunshine in the next few days! I planted out some starts under row covers, mulched and finished the deadhedge in the back to stop the winds.
winter-garden.jpg
[Thumbnail for winter-garden.jpg]
the winter garden today
 
Too many men are afraid of being fools - Henry Ford. Foolish tiny ad:
Thread Boost feature
https://permies.com/wiki/61482/Thread-Boost-feature
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!