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tiny house rocket mass heater: the cyclone batch style  RSS feed

 
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I don't understand how normal bricks are able to withstand the heat. Aren't refractory bricks necessary? What temperatures are reached inside the bell? I'd love to build this in my tinyhouse.

Kirk Mobert wrote:The mortar is clay/sand, again using locally sourced clay soil for the clay and locally sourced sand too. Cement based mixes can't handle the heat and should NEVER be used in stoves.
The plywood form is for making the arches. The bricks are laid over the form and then it's taken down and moved for the next row.

 
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Mjølner Rankenberg
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And what about the mortar?

paul wheaton wrote:Old school bricks made from clay will do quite well.

 
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I think a sort of cob is used as mortar.
 
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Mjølner Rankenberg wrote:And what about the mortar?



For my own brick bell I've used a fireclay/fine sand mix with a 'very' small amount of Portland cement to help hold things together while it dried properly. It's working well so far.
 
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this is so awesome kirk! brilliant. i mean, donkey....never got used to calling you that, but funny thing is that's also my nickname now at Itazipco healing camp in South Dakota. you might not remember me, but im the guy from kenya who used to run in the mornings that was at one of your workshops a couple years back.

using some of the ideas gleaned here, i will soon be setting up a tipi on a raised platform with a batch box rmh...had already done one, but it was temporary, with a converted hq wood stove (ash/cob insulated) as the batch box. worked great, but the tipi cover itself had some issues...getting a new one and am now re-vamping the whole project - came on here for some inspiration and found the "rmh in a tipi" thread(!!!)...so awesome Paul Wheaton and others. Thank-you all for sharing your beautiful work!

really hope you're still watching this thread as im curious about the ratios of cow dung, grog, ash, and clay soil...knowing that i'll have to play around with whatever mix i make for the best results. And also...i saw it asked and answered, but the primary and secondary air is not clear to me with the casserole door. Is there a gap somewhere between the glass/pyrex door and the cob that allows air in? I think i see one at the bottom of the door in the pictures/videos, but im not sure, and am also curious about the dimensions - doesn't seem like it's quite up to peterberg's csa dimensions for batch air intake - but please do enlighten me. and is the metal channel to the throat running over the batch box then down into the port like a typical peter channel?
 
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[quote=Kirk Mobert



I think that because my mix is really light (wood ash and all) it insulates well, which helps get the temps up. The other important detail is undersized bell leading to a hot chimney (not too hot, you'd have to work hard to get burned on it).



....The firebox mix is intended to be able to make anyplace in the world, by the poorest people.




Kirk,
thank you for sharing the wonderful pictures and details!  When you say the mix was really light (wood ash and all)...are you talking about just the mix on the inside of the rise, correct?  is there any information on making and applying your own refractory mixes on these forums?
also, when you say the firebox mix is intended to be able to make anyplace in the world...what do you mean by 'firebox mix'?

thank you!




 
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Wonderful
 
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This is really great. I really like this design and am wondering if there are plans so that I could build one? Thanks
 
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