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tiny house rocket mass heater: the cyclone batch style  RSS feed

 
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I don't understand how normal bricks are able to withstand the heat. Aren't refractory bricks necessary? What temperatures are reached inside the bell? I'd love to build this in my tinyhouse.

Kirk Mobert wrote:The mortar is clay/sand, again using locally sourced clay soil for the clay and locally sourced sand too. Cement based mixes can't handle the heat and should NEVER be used in stoves.
The plywood form is for making the arches. The bricks are laid over the form and then it's taken down and moved for the next row.

 
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Old school bricks made from clay will do quite well.
 
Mjølner Rankenberg
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And what about the mortar?

paul wheaton wrote:Old school bricks made from clay will do quite well.

 
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I think a sort of cob is used as mortar.
 
pollinator
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Mjølner Rankenberg wrote:And what about the mortar?



For my own brick bell I've used a fireclay/fine sand mix with a 'very' small amount of Portland cement to help hold things together while it dried properly. It's working well so far.
 
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this is so awesome kirk! brilliant. i mean, donkey....never got used to calling you that, but funny thing is that's also my nickname now at Itazipco healing camp in South Dakota. you might not remember me, but im the guy from kenya who used to run in the mornings that was at one of your workshops a couple years back.

using some of the ideas gleaned here, i will soon be setting up a tipi on a raised platform with a batch box rmh...had already done one, but it was temporary, with a converted hq wood stove (ash/cob insulated) as the batch box. worked great, but the tipi cover itself had some issues...getting a new one and am now re-vamping the whole project - came on here for some inspiration and found the "rmh in a tipi" thread(!!!)...so awesome Paul Wheaton and others. Thank-you all for sharing your beautiful work!

really hope you're still watching this thread as im curious about the ratios of cow dung, grog, ash, and clay soil...knowing that i'll have to play around with whatever mix i make for the best results. And also...i saw it asked and answered, but the primary and secondary air is not clear to me with the casserole door. Is there a gap somewhere between the glass/pyrex door and the cob that allows air in? I think i see one at the bottom of the door in the pictures/videos, but im not sure, and am also curious about the dimensions - doesn't seem like it's quite up to peterberg's csa dimensions for batch air intake - but please do enlighten me. and is the metal channel to the throat running over the batch box then down into the port like a typical peter channel?
 
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[quote=Kirk Mobert



I think that because my mix is really light (wood ash and all) it insulates well, which helps get the temps up. The other important detail is undersized bell leading to a hot chimney (not too hot, you'd have to work hard to get burned on it).



....The firebox mix is intended to be able to make anyplace in the world, by the poorest people.




Kirk,
thank you for sharing the wonderful pictures and details!  When you say the mix was really light (wood ash and all)...are you talking about just the mix on the inside of the rise, correct?  is there any information on making and applying your own refractory mixes on these forums?
also, when you say the firebox mix is intended to be able to make anyplace in the world...what do you mean by 'firebox mix'?

thank you!




 
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Wonderful
 
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This is really great. I really like this design and am wondering if there are plans so that I could build one? Thanks
 
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I agree way cool!
 
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Hi I am a new be to this site i have 2 question.  How do you remove the forms in arch with damaging the structure. With the bell heat exchanger do you need to periodically clean out ash build up and if so how would this be done.

Love the brilliance of your design so simple and elegant.

Thanks
Andrew
Lower Creek
Australia
 
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Andrew, often the forms are juste burned, ans yes you need to clean fly ash. Often you make a removable top, or a cleanout door
 
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This looks like the ideal option for our situation. Since there is apparently no plans available for this build, is there anyone willing to help guide us through this process? We've ordered and read Ernie & Erica's book, also Ivanto's (sp?). However, since we've never built one, we feel more comfortable having someone to communicate with throughout the process. Funds are our largest lacking resource and wasting money and materials is not an option. We are in Arkansas with access to local clay and sand on our property. Knowing how to mix this for mortar is something we would need help with as well. We do have a nearby friend who has built a RMH in his home and is willing to help periodically, as time may allow and this may be minimal. We certainly appreciate anyone willing to help. After our first build, we have 5 more to build in the cabins on the property. Thank you in advance.
 
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Hi Karlene;  Welcome to Permies!
That particular stove was built by "Donkey" He has his own forum, known as Donkey proboard  Here is a link http://donkey32.proboards.com/ Anybody, including donkey, at that forum would be glad to help.
Also lots of experienced builders here at permies will be happy to share what they have learned.
As a first time builder, rather than a batch box you might start with a J tube rocket.   It does not have to use a long heavy mass it can also be plumbed into brick bells.
Just being able to see your neighbors rmh should help no matter his style of build.
Making cob is work no getting away from it.  But if you are containing that cob within walls then its consistency becomes much less important. Only exposed cob benches need smooth crack free cob . If your mass (if you use one) is contained by brick or stone then the cob is just filler around your rocks. 
 
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There are several of us here who would be happy to advise in a forum thread, so that the information is preserved for future readers.

I think if you start a new thread with your site information, you will get good detailed direction. This original thread has a lot of good information for those who can look at photos and figure out brick layouts, etc.
 
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