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the many benefits of apple cider vinegar

 
steward
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just came across this pretty nifty list of benefits of apple cider vinegar

one they left out is it makes a nifty little conditioner for your hair when diluted as well. (that's my main use of it)

then at the end of the list of benefits there is an option to get the ebook which actually I think seems like it has tons of information, and it's only a buck.

she talks about "the mother", how much to consume, how to consume it, what recipes there are out there, and which are the best, what are ALL the different uses for it, how to make it yourself, things to be aware of when using it, and much more.

Click HERE to read about the benefits and get the $1 ebook

 
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Cassie Langstraat
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Not sure. Why?
 
steward
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Another use I discovered is to put it in a spray bottle (various recipes on the Interwebs) and spray stuff you don't want your puppy to chew. So far, it's helping with our new little ranch hand.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Ann Torrence wrote:Another use I discovered is to put it in a spray bottle (various recipes on the Interwebs) and spray stuff you don't want your puppy to chew. So far, it's helping with our new little ranch hand.



Oh that's a nice one! I'll have to tell my parents about that one. They just got a new little cow dog too!
 
pollinator
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I use it for cleaning, I rinse my hair in it, I drink it (diluted of course), I use it as mouthwash (after brushing teeth w. Bicarbonate soda, it neutralizes the mouth pH), I make an anti-tangle spray for my kids' hair, I add it t chicken broth to dissolve the nutrients. My husband washes his scalp with it to kill dandruff. Simply could not live without it. I've started making my own - it is simply too expensive to buy that much organic ACV at the store. My local green grocer gives me his own apples (natural, not certified, but organic) at almost no price when they are tired and unsellable - something like €2 for more than 2 kg last time - enough to make a lot. Thinking my apple seeds might produce some crab-apples that will enhance the flavor.
 
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All of you must be well aware of the many benefits of ACV (and there are tons of those). But at the same time, one should refrain from using it in excess as it can adversely affect you. This can be due to its acidic nature or interaction with certain medicines.

It can lower potassium levels which can further lead to cramps or sometimes irregular heart beat.

Here's a descriptive article on the side effects of ACV: Side Effects of ACV
 
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Hi Michael and welcome to Permies.

I, as a long time user of ACV, have read of many benefits. I also believe in "all things in moderation". Thank you for your post, but I'm not sure about this particular article.

This article seems to use a bit of attention grabbing headlines and states many "facts" that the author has no (listed) basis for. He does lists three sources and their links, but they do not support the claims he has made in the article. Furthermore, I did not see any credentials for the author allowing him to make such unfounded claims.

The sources he listed:

Sources
Fushimi, T., Suruga, K., Oshima, Y., Fukiharu, M., Tsukamoto, Y., Goda, T., “Dietary acetic acid reduces serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols in rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet,” US National Library of Medicine, May 2006; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16611381, last accessed February 22, 2017.

“Delayed gastric emptying rate may explain improved glycaemia in healthy subjects to a starchy meal with added vinegar,” US National Library of Medicine; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9630389, last accessed February 22, 2017.

“Consequences of caustic ingestions in children,” US National Library of Medicine; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7841737, last accessed February 22, 2017.

I (Karen) see two sources there stating positive benefits of vinegar and the last source there states this:

"Abstract:
A retrospective analysis of 98 patients, less than 15 years of age, treated for caustic ingestion during 1976-1990 was performed to evaluate the modern consequences of caustic ingestion in children and to set indications for esophagoscopies and radiographic and laboratory examinations. Dishwasher detergents were ingested by 56 children. There were no lye ingestions, since lye has not been freely available in Finland since 1969. Household acetic acid (vinegar) was the most commonly (12/23) ingested acid. Primary esophagoscopy was performed in 79 of the 98 cases (80.6%). Esophageal burns were found in 20 patients. Acids caused burns more often than alkalies (9/23 (39.1%) versus 11/75 (14.7%); p = 0.011; 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the difference 5.6-43.3%) and acid burns more often developed into scars (7.4% versus 4%; p = 0.029; 95% CI for the difference 1.4-25.4%). The only esophageal stricture developed after ingestion of a Clinitest tablet. The mean time for hospitalization as a result of acid ingestion was significantly longer than after alkaline ingestion (3.2 (SD 3.5) days, n = 23 versus 1.5 (1.6) days, n = 75; p < 0.05; 95% CI for the difference 0.7-2.8 days). Prolonged drooling and dysphagia (12-24 h) predicted esophageal scar formation with 100% sensitivity and 90.1% specificity, but signs and symptoms did not predict esophageal burns after primary esophagoscopy. Radiographic examinations and leukocyte counts were of no value in predicting esophageal burns and scars. The panorama of caustic ingestion appears to have changed, probably due in part to the law banning sale of lye products since 1969. This type of law should be encouraged elsewhere. Acids cause even more caustic burns than alkalies. Vinegar should be regarded as a potent caustic substance and distributed in baby-safe bottles with appropriate information on its caustic nature. As severe esophageal lesions after accidental ingestion of caustic substances are now rare in children, primary esophagoscopies and hospitalization of patients are not indicated routinely. The decision on esophagoscopy can be made on the basis of drooling and dysphagia during follow-up."

Who would give their child or allow their child access to (what I assume was undiluted) vinegar anyway? Or dishwasher detergent or lye?

He also lists 4 Facts About Apple Cider Vinegar, of which the first one, regarding weight loss, seems neither positive or negative (in my opinion) and the other three are all positive benefits.

I'm not going to, as he said, "chug the entire bottle." I will, however, keep using apple cider vinegar as a digestive aid and occasional heartburn relief. And, I will continue to use it as a household cleaner and hair rinse.

My opinion of this article has no reflection on you, Michael, I am sure you provided this link with the aim to help and we love when people post helpful/useful information. I just didn't find it to be fact filled.
 
Michael Fern
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Hi Karen,

Thanks for your quick reply on this. I'll surely recheck the facts stated here. But I found quite a few similar facts on a much bigger health site. Here's the link to that: http://www.healthline.com/nutrition/apple-cider-vinegar-side-effects

I also wanted to put out these side effects of ACV because of late everyone has jumped onto the bandwagon of ACV being this elixir which has many benefits including drastic weight loss.

Please check the above link and let me know how much of this holds true. At the same time, I too will go through it.
 
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As was stated, everything in moderation.  I will research on the potassium bit.  As I am curious.  I use in my water.  Yet, I don't think I consume more than a tablespoon a day.  
 
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Michael Fern wrote: Please check the above link and let me know how much of this holds true. At the same time, I too will go through it.



Thank you for warning us of the risk of using it in large doses.  I had never heard of it being used for weight loss.  A Dr. we used to use recommended taking 1 Tablespoon in a glass of water every morning.


From the last link:

Apple cider vinegar can provide several health benefits.

However, to stay safe and prevent side effects, it's important to monitor the amount you consume and be careful with how you take it.

While a small amount of vinegar is good, more isn't better and may even be harmful.

Most people can safely consume reasonable amounts of apple cider vinegar by following these general guidelines:

   Limit your intake: Start with a smaller amount and gradually work up to a maximum of 2 tablespoons (30 ml) per day, depending on your personal tolerance.
   Minimize your tooth exposure to acetic acid: Try diluting the vinegar in water and drinking it through a straw.
   Rinse your mouth: Rinse with water after taking it. To prevent further enamel damage, wait at least 30 minutes before brushing your teeth.
   Consider avoiding it if you have gastroparesis: Avoid apple cider vinegar or limit the amount to 1 teaspoon (5 ml) in water or salad dressing.
   Be aware of allergies: Allergies to apple cider vinegar are rare, but stop taking it immediately if you experience an allergic reaction.
 
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I bought a case of Bragg's ACV. Normally, when I would buy one bottle, it had the mother in it, or would grow one during the time I was using it. This whole case of ACV does not have the mother. Yes, it has sentiment on the bottom, but not the floaty jellyfish like mother I'm used to. So, finally I was done with that case and I bought another case of Azure Standard's brand that they make in Oregon on their farm. Again, no mother. Is this normal? Is it still alive? I'm wondering if it was stored improperly before I got it and either got too hot or too cold and killed the mother's?

Thank you for your help!
 
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Vermont Village makes a wonderful Blueberry+honey sipping vinegar, I add a shot to club soda and it makes a great substitute for Kombucha. Unfortunately Walmart may no longer be carrying it  at $2.48
for 4 oz. its $11.00 through Amazon. My question is, has anyone every made blueberry vinegar?
 
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Michael Fern wrote:Hi Karen,

Thanks for your quick reply on this. I'll surely recheck the facts stated here. But I found quite a few similar facts on a much bigger health site. Here's the link to that: http://www.healthline.com/nutrition/apple-cider-vinegar-side-effects

I also wanted to put out these side effects of ACV because of late everyone has jumped onto the bandwagon of ACV being this elixir which has many benefits including drastic weight loss.

Please check the above link and let me know how much of this holds true. At the same time, I too will go through it.



Thanks Michael for your post. It's dangerous to focus only on the benefits.. Just because the products are natural, does not mean they can't harm you. Natural=automatically safe/healthy? I don't think so
I used to make my own kombucha and was drinking daily a fair amount. In the end it gave me stress, sleeplessness, headaches, digestive problems and other bad side effects. Also, it can trigger too much histamine.

https://www.healthline.com/health/histamine-intolerance

 
pollinator
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I use it as a hair rinse, keep some in a small spray bottle in my purse as a natural disinfectant spray, take it for occasional acid reflex, and drink some as soon as I experience digestive upset or suspect possible food poisoning - it really helps!

I first learned about ACV as a teen from the book "Folk Medicine" by D. C. Jarvis.

Folk Medicine book link
folk-medicine.jpg
[Thumbnail for folk-medicine.jpg]
 
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Be careful on the $1 ebook. When I looked at it there was an additional monthly fee to be charged at a later date.
Not sure if this has changed in the four years since the original post
Staff note (Rebecca Norman) :

Thank you for the heads up! I've unlinked it but kept the thread since the discussion seems useful.

 
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I just made some Fire Cider. It has to sit for a month, and then I'll strain it.

Fire Cider Recipe

1 lg horseradish root, about 7” long, scrubbed, grated
1 lg ginger root, about 7” long, grated
1 lg onion, chopped
1 lg orange, skin and all, chopped
1 lemon, skin and all, chopped
16 cloves of garlic, chopped
2-4 habanero peppers, stem removed, chopped
1 tbsp ground turmeric, or fresh turmeric, grated
raw apple cider vinegar
raw honey (add after straining, to taste)

Run quickly through a food processor, or just chop the orange, lemon, and peppers into small chunks. Add everything to 2 quart jars (or whatever jars you have). Pour enough vinegar to cover. Seal and store in cool dark place for 4 weeks. Strain and bottle. Take 1-2 tbsp daily, or use as salad dressing, in cooking, or in hot water.

Other things I added: parsley, rosemary, oregano

I'm really looking forward to trying it. I've had pre-made Fire Cider, but have never made my own. It packs a punch!
 
pollinator
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Tracy Wandling wrote:I just made some Fire Cider. It has to sit for a month, and then I'll strain it.

Fire Cider Recipe

1 lg horseradish root, about 7” long, scrubbed, grated
1 lg ginger root, about 7” long, grated
1 lg onion, chopped
1 lg orange, skin and all, chopped
1 lemon, skin and all, chopped
16 cloves of garlic, chopped
2-4 habanero peppers, stem removed, chopped
1 tbsp ground turmeric, or fresh turmeric, grated
raw apple cider vinegar
raw honey (add after straining, to taste)

Run quickly through a food processor, or just chop the orange, lemon, and peppers into small chunks. Add everything to 2 quart jars (or whatever jars you have). Pour enough vinegar to cover. Seal and store in cool dark place for 4 weeks. Strain and bottle. Take 1-2 tbsp daily, or use as salad dressing, in cooking, or in hot water.

Other things I added: parsley, rosemary, oregano

I'm really looking forward to trying it. I've had pre-made Fire Cider, but have never made my own. It packs a punch!



Wow, those habeneros are no joke. That fire may burn twice! But it will be potent.
 
Tracy Wandling
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Yeah, it's a pretty fiery blend. Best used in small quantities. : ) But lots of goodness in there. It's a great tonic.
 
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What is the claimed benefit of Fire Cider? I have heard of it before, in the book by Carla Emery I think. I too read the doc Jarvis book as a teenager. I use cider vinegar in cooking, to make buttermilk, and as a supplement in animal feed. I never did jump on the ACV bandwagon. Just another baseless fad imho.
 
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Apple cider vinegar is made from apple cider acquired from pressed apples. The cider undergoes double fermentation; the first to convert sugars into alcohol and the second to break down the alcohol into acetic acid. The sugar content in apples serves as a source of nutrition for the bacteria to feed on for producing alcohol and then vinegar. While vinegar does contain malic, citric and lactic acids, it is primarily composed of acetic acid. It is probiotic in nature and has a very low-calorie count, with a single tablespoonful containing 4-5 calories. Apple cider vinegar uses also cover the promotion of probiotic bacteria within the digestive tract.

It is amongst the most prominent of vinegar used today because of its taste and numerous apple cider vinegar benefits. It is vastly superior to artificial kinds of vinegar since it is comprised of completely natural ingredients. This lends it a better nutritional profile with vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients. Moreover, it has numerous health benefits and cooking applications.

Apple cider vinegar uses date back to ancient times since the oldest civilizations at 5,0000 B.C. Cave paintings and scriptures that have survived time indicate it was even then recognized for its medicinal properties. It was also an important part of an everyday diet and an integral ingredient in local cuisines.
 
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Hi everyone. I used apple cider vinegar to remove a mole I had on my earlobe. Before bed, I dabbed a cotton ball and placed it on the mole, taped it to secure it and took it off in the morning. Did this for about 3 weeks and it scabbed and fell right off.  Some of the ACV touched my skin and burned it slightly so make sure it doesn’t touch your skin. The burned skin was very minor and didn’t scar so I didn’t bother trying to heal the burn with aloe vera or colloidal silver gel.
 
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I put organic acv (with the mother) into my chickens & goats water supply, to help with their health, use it in salad dressings, in small amounts for my health, making fire cider, skin applications - works great on chiggers, though it stings like hell. But, I don't use it for cleaning, because plain ol' distilled white vinegar is easy cheaper & just as effective.
 
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moles and warts :
I used to have 2 large moles on my forehead/eyebrow. After 3 - 4 weeks of sleeping with a cotton ball of ACV taped to moles, they scabbed up and totally fell off. Amazing. Mind blown. They both healed up and didn't leave any scarring. It's been 6 years with my new face, and maybe only one of the moles seems like it might be just starting to grow. Maybe in another 10-15 years it will be big enough to ACV again.
skin and spots:
Also used ACV on dark spots on my hands, skin tags, and warts all with positive results. After a month of nightly taping of ACV soaked cotton balls, hand spots lightened or disappeared, tags and warts fell off.
sports drink:
I use a splash of ACV and a pinch of salt in my water bottle as my sugar free sports drink. yum. I think I read this recipe somewhere. Anything to encourage me to drink more sugar free water.
hair and body:
It's great (diluted) on hair/body as a conditioner and counter acts the ph of a baking soda wash. Takes care of dandruff, smells, and even many fungal issues because of the changes in ph. (i use both the baking soda and ACV on my body so I'm not sure which one is the active ingredient in the effectiveness)
zing!
Occasionally I'll take a tiny sip of ACV straight to wake me up with that sour zing instead of coffee.
Some times I'll add a splash to what I'm cooking if a hint of fruity sour would be helpful in filling out the flavor profile.
beer:
Add a splash to a beer or cider to make it amazing.
cleaning:
Maybe any vinegar will work for cleaning, but I use diluted ACV on kitchen surfaces and sure enough, ants and roaches avoid it.
and...
Moderation and diluting are important for most uses. I probably consume/use no more than a table spoon on a heavy use day.
Good luck, hope you find what works for you!
 
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Apple cider vinegar(or any other vinegar) should NEVER be ingested full strength.  Not only can it cause gastric upset, it can damage blood cells.  Diluted is a different story.  I use it in the stock tank for the goats, cows, horses when we have those (don’t have any now), and it keeps parasite eggs from hatching in their gut, effectively keeping them wormed.  Put a cup into bath water, and get rid of sore muscles.  I usually throw in a handful of Epsom salt along with it.  
 
Julie Reed
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An addition to the food list- when I make pizza dough I often use beer instead of water- usually a bitter IPA or Flemish sour ale. But lacking either, a tablespoon of ACV in the water (1 cup) will give a nice tangy sourdough-like crust. The acidity also slows down the growth of the yeast slightly, allowing the taste to develop more fully, but plan on extra time for the dough to rise.
 
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There has been  been considerable research indicating it reduces blood sugar by as much as 20%.
 
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TOO MUCH ACV?

I just wanted to say something about the alleged harm that "too much" ACV is said to cause ( I read the article linked and other, similar contents).

I drink/consume literally 1-3 fluid ounces per day - mostly in drinks.  This would definitely be more than most folks consume and would be considered by many, as "excessive."  

I actually do it to *raise* potassium levels.  That's what I was told in the Paul Bragg literature and deduced from the potassium content.  I have never had the stated side effects of potassium depletion, so even though I cannot be sure that I am augmenting potassium, I highly doubt there is any depletion going on.  The body it seems, tends to make use of the acid to chelate needed minerals, and flush excess minerals.  The body is an intelligent organism and it loves ACV.

I have had no issues with tooth enamel, even though I am sipping/drinking it all day long and before bed.  I eat a vegan diet high in minerals and my teeth stay mineralized.  Occasionally I get sensitive teeth but have never been able to connect it with ACV consumption because it is consistent and my teeth sensitivity isn't.  I rather attribute this to occasional consumption of organic corn chips, which grind in the teeth.  But the enamel thickens rapidly.  No cavities in over 30 years (and I have consumed ACV in quantity for that many years).

I have gargled ACV in concentration (and on a few occasions drank it "straight") and while the throat disruption was uncomfortable, the cleansing was thorough (as a singer I could resume singing if I didn't take it too far) and no long-term discomfort (nothing more than an hour or so or in rare cases, three hours).

There is some warning in that article linked, about using it for weight loss.  I am too slender to worry about this, but others have been successful, and what on earth would be the worry about the feeling of "fullness"?  The real benefit of ACV is in its delayed absorption of sugar which prevents spiking blood sugar and excess insulin response which can exacerbate weight gain.  ACV really does work to regulate blood sugar.

ACV aids digestion and supplements the stomach's energy-intensive acid production.  It cuts down on indigestion and assists breaking down food for improved nutrition absorption.  This more than makes up for any potassium worries (unless perhaps on a potassium-therapy medication).

Someone is afraid of ACV, it appears.

Paul Bragg in his books told the old story of a scientist who kept chicken embryos alive indefinitely with organic apple cider vinegar.  It could therefore be considered a "perfect" or "miracle" food.

I have done fasting for 27 days twice with distilled water and ACV.  No tooth issues whatsoever.  ACV helped with the cleanse and with providing a tiny boost of energy.

I wouldn't want to be without it.

-Scott Gordon
 
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