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the many benefits of apple cider vinegar

 
steward
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just came across this pretty nifty list of benefits of apple cider vinegar

one they left out is it makes a nifty little conditioner for your hair when diluted as well. (that's my main use of it)

then at the end of the list of benefits there is an option to get the ebook which actually I think seems like it has tons of information, and it's only a buck.

she talks about "the mother", how much to consume, how to consume it, what recipes there are out there, and which are the best, what are ALL the different uses for it, how to make it yourself, things to be aware of when using it, and much more.

Click HERE to read about the benefits and get the $1 ebook

 
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Cassie Langstraat
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Not sure. Why?
 
steward
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Another use I discovered is to put it in a spray bottle (various recipes on the Interwebs) and spray stuff you don't want your puppy to chew. So far, it's helping with our new little ranch hand.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Ann Torrence wrote:Another use I discovered is to put it in a spray bottle (various recipes on the Interwebs) and spray stuff you don't want your puppy to chew. So far, it's helping with our new little ranch hand.



Oh that's a nice one! I'll have to tell my parents about that one. They just got a new little cow dog too!
 
pollinator
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I use it for cleaning, I rinse my hair in it, I drink it (diluted of course), I use it as mouthwash (after brushing teeth w. Bicarbonate soda, it neutralizes the mouth pH), I make an anti-tangle spray for my kids' hair, I add it t chicken broth to dissolve the nutrients. My husband washes his scalp with it to kill dandruff. Simply could not live without it. I've started making my own - it is simply too expensive to buy that much organic ACV at the store. My local green grocer gives me his own apples (natural, not certified, but organic) at almost no price when they are tired and unsellable - something like €2 for more than 2 kg last time - enough to make a lot. Thinking my apple seeds might produce some crab-apples that will enhance the flavor.
 
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All of you must be well aware of the many benefits of ACV (and there are tons of those). But at the same time, one should refrain from using it in excess as it can adversely affect you. This can be due to its acidic nature or interaction with certain medicines.

It can lower potassium levels which can further lead to cramps or sometimes irregular heart beat.

Here's a descriptive article on the side effects of ACV: Side Effects of ACV
 
gardener
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Hi Michael and welcome to Permies.

I, as a long time user of ACV, have read of many benefits. I also believe in "all things in moderation". Thank you for your post, but I'm not sure about this particular article.

This article seems to use a bit of attention grabbing headlines and states many "facts" that the author has no (listed) basis for. He does lists three sources and their links, but they do not support the claims he has made in the article. Furthermore, I did not see any credentials for the author allowing him to make such unfounded claims.

The sources he listed:

Sources
Fushimi, T., Suruga, K., Oshima, Y., Fukiharu, M., Tsukamoto, Y., Goda, T., “Dietary acetic acid reduces serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols in rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet,” US National Library of Medicine, May 2006; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16611381, last accessed February 22, 2017.

“Delayed gastric emptying rate may explain improved glycaemia in healthy subjects to a starchy meal with added vinegar,” US National Library of Medicine; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9630389, last accessed February 22, 2017.

“Consequences of caustic ingestions in children,” US National Library of Medicine; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7841737, last accessed February 22, 2017.

I (Karen) see two sources there stating positive benefits of vinegar and the last source there states this:

"Abstract:
A retrospective analysis of 98 patients, less than 15 years of age, treated for caustic ingestion during 1976-1990 was performed to evaluate the modern consequences of caustic ingestion in children and to set indications for esophagoscopies and radiographic and laboratory examinations. Dishwasher detergents were ingested by 56 children. There were no lye ingestions, since lye has not been freely available in Finland since 1969. Household acetic acid (vinegar) was the most commonly (12/23) ingested acid. Primary esophagoscopy was performed in 79 of the 98 cases (80.6%). Esophageal burns were found in 20 patients. Acids caused burns more often than alkalies (9/23 (39.1%) versus 11/75 (14.7%); p = 0.011; 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the difference 5.6-43.3%) and acid burns more often developed into scars (7.4% versus 4%; p = 0.029; 95% CI for the difference 1.4-25.4%). The only esophageal stricture developed after ingestion of a Clinitest tablet. The mean time for hospitalization as a result of acid ingestion was significantly longer than after alkaline ingestion (3.2 (SD 3.5) days, n = 23 versus 1.5 (1.6) days, n = 75; p < 0.05; 95% CI for the difference 0.7-2.8 days). Prolonged drooling and dysphagia (12-24 h) predicted esophageal scar formation with 100% sensitivity and 90.1% specificity, but signs and symptoms did not predict esophageal burns after primary esophagoscopy. Radiographic examinations and leukocyte counts were of no value in predicting esophageal burns and scars. The panorama of caustic ingestion appears to have changed, probably due in part to the law banning sale of lye products since 1969. This type of law should be encouraged elsewhere. Acids cause even more caustic burns than alkalies. Vinegar should be regarded as a potent caustic substance and distributed in baby-safe bottles with appropriate information on its caustic nature. As severe esophageal lesions after accidental ingestion of caustic substances are now rare in children, primary esophagoscopies and hospitalization of patients are not indicated routinely. The decision on esophagoscopy can be made on the basis of drooling and dysphagia during follow-up."

Who would give their child or allow their child access to (what I assume was undiluted) vinegar anyway? Or dishwasher detergent or lye?

He also lists 4 Facts About Apple Cider Vinegar, of which the first one, regarding weight loss, seems neither positive or negative (in my opinion) and the other three are all positive benefits.

I'm not going to, as he said, "chug the entire bottle." I will, however, keep using apple cider vinegar as a digestive aid and occasional heartburn relief. And, I will continue to use it as a household cleaner and hair rinse.

My opinion of this article has no reflection on you, Michael, I am sure you provided this link with the aim to help and we love when people post helpful/useful information. I just didn't find it to be fact filled.
 
Michael Fern
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Hi Karen,

Thanks for your quick reply on this. I'll surely recheck the facts stated here. But I found quite a few similar facts on a much bigger health site. Here's the link to that: http://www.healthline.com/nutrition/apple-cider-vinegar-side-effects

I also wanted to put out these side effects of ACV because of late everyone has jumped onto the bandwagon of ACV being this elixir which has many benefits including drastic weight loss.

Please check the above link and let me know how much of this holds true. At the same time, I too will go through it.
 
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As was stated, everything in moderation.  I will research on the potassium bit.  As I am curious.  I use in my water.  Yet, I don't think I consume more than a tablespoon a day.  
 
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Michael Fern wrote: Please check the above link and let me know how much of this holds true. At the same time, I too will go through it.



Thank you for warning us of the risk of using it in large doses.  I had never heard of it being used for weight loss.  A Dr. we used to use recommended taking 1 Tablespoon in a glass of water every morning.


From the last link:

Apple cider vinegar can provide several health benefits.

However, to stay safe and prevent side effects, it's important to monitor the amount you consume and be careful with how you take it.

While a small amount of vinegar is good, more isn't better and may even be harmful.

Most people can safely consume reasonable amounts of apple cider vinegar by following these general guidelines:

   Limit your intake: Start with a smaller amount and gradually work up to a maximum of 2 tablespoons (30 ml) per day, depending on your personal tolerance.
   Minimize your tooth exposure to acetic acid: Try diluting the vinegar in water and drinking it through a straw.
   Rinse your mouth: Rinse with water after taking it. To prevent further enamel damage, wait at least 30 minutes before brushing your teeth.
   Consider avoiding it if you have gastroparesis: Avoid apple cider vinegar or limit the amount to 1 teaspoon (5 ml) in water or salad dressing.
   Be aware of allergies: Allergies to apple cider vinegar are rare, but stop taking it immediately if you experience an allergic reaction.
 
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I bought a case of Bragg's ACV. Normally, when I would buy one bottle, it had the mother in it, or would grow one during the time I was using it. This whole case of ACV does not have the mother. Yes, it has sentiment on the bottom, but not the floaty jellyfish like mother I'm used to. So, finally I was done with that case and I bought another case of Azure Standard's brand that they make in Oregon on their farm. Again, no mother. Is this normal? Is it still alive? I'm wondering if it was stored improperly before I got it and either got too hot or too cold and killed the mother's?

Thank you for your help!
 
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Vermont Village makes a wonderful Blueberry+honey sipping vinegar, I add a shot to club soda and it makes a great substitute for Kombucha. Unfortunately Walmart may no longer be carrying it  at $2.48
for 4 oz. its $11.00 through Amazon. My question is, has anyone every made blueberry vinegar?
 
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Michael Fern wrote:Hi Karen,

Thanks for your quick reply on this. I'll surely recheck the facts stated here. But I found quite a few similar facts on a much bigger health site. Here's the link to that: http://www.healthline.com/nutrition/apple-cider-vinegar-side-effects

I also wanted to put out these side effects of ACV because of late everyone has jumped onto the bandwagon of ACV being this elixir which has many benefits including drastic weight loss.

Please check the above link and let me know how much of this holds true. At the same time, I too will go through it.



Thanks Michael for your post. It's dangerous to focus only on the benefits.. Just because the products are natural, does not mean they can't harm you. Natural=automatically safe/healthy? I don't think so
I used to make my own kombucha and was drinking daily a fair amount. In the end it gave me stress, sleeplessness, headaches, digestive problems and other bad side effects. Also, it can trigger too much histamine.

https://www.healthline.com/health/histamine-intolerance

 
pollinator
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I use it as a hair rinse, keep some in a small spray bottle in my purse as a natural disinfectant spray, take it for occasional acid reflex, and drink some as soon as I experience digestive upset or suspect possible food poisoning - it really helps!

I first learned about ACV as a teen from the book "Folk Medicine" by D. C. Jarvis.

Folk Medicine book link
folk-medicine.jpg
[Thumbnail for folk-medicine.jpg]
 
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Be careful on the $1 ebook. When I looked at it there was an additional monthly fee to be charged at a later date.
Not sure if this has changed in the four years since the original post
Staff note (Rebecca Norman):

Thank you for the heads up! I've unlinked it but kept the thread since the discussion seems useful.

 
steward
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I just made some Fire Cider. It has to sit for a month, and then I'll strain it.

Fire Cider Recipe

1 lg horseradish root, about 7” long, scrubbed, grated
1 lg ginger root, about 7” long, grated
1 lg onion, chopped
1 lg orange, skin and all, chopped
1 lemon, skin and all, chopped
16 cloves of garlic, chopped
2-4 habanero peppers, stem removed, chopped
1 tbsp ground turmeric, or fresh turmeric, grated
raw apple cider vinegar
raw honey (add after straining, to taste)

Run quickly through a food processor, or just chop the orange, lemon, and peppers into small chunks. Add everything to 2 quart jars (or whatever jars you have). Pour enough vinegar to cover. Seal and store in cool dark place for 4 weeks. Strain and bottle. Take 1-2 tbsp daily, or use as salad dressing, in cooking, or in hot water.

Other things I added: parsley, rosemary, oregano

I'm really looking forward to trying it. I've had pre-made Fire Cider, but have never made my own. It packs a punch!
 
pollinator
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Tracy Wandling wrote:I just made some Fire Cider. It has to sit for a month, and then I'll strain it.

Fire Cider Recipe

1 lg horseradish root, about 7” long, scrubbed, grated
1 lg ginger root, about 7” long, grated
1 lg onion, chopped
1 lg orange, skin and all, chopped
1 lemon, skin and all, chopped
16 cloves of garlic, chopped
2-4 habanero peppers, stem removed, chopped
1 tbsp ground turmeric, or fresh turmeric, grated
raw apple cider vinegar
raw honey (add after straining, to taste)

Run quickly through a food processor, or just chop the orange, lemon, and peppers into small chunks. Add everything to 2 quart jars (or whatever jars you have). Pour enough vinegar to cover. Seal and store in cool dark place for 4 weeks. Strain and bottle. Take 1-2 tbsp daily, or use as salad dressing, in cooking, or in hot water.

Other things I added: parsley, rosemary, oregano

I'm really looking forward to trying it. I've had pre-made Fire Cider, but have never made my own. It packs a punch!



Wow, those habeneros are no joke. That fire may burn twice! But it will be potent.
 
Tracy Wandling
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Yeah, it's a pretty fiery blend. Best used in small quantities. : ) But lots of goodness in there. It's a great tonic.
 
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What is the claimed benefit of Fire Cider? I have heard of it before, in the book by Carla Emery I think. I too read the doc Jarvis book as a teenager. I use cider vinegar in cooking, to make buttermilk, and as a supplement in animal feed. I never did jump on the ACV bandwagon. Just another baseless fad imho.
 
Oh, sure, you could do that. Or you could eat some pie. While reading this tiny ad:
Solar Dehydrator Plans - Combo Package download
https://permies.com/t/solar-dehydrator
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