• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Nomadic Housing  RSS feed

 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 6410
Location: Left Coast Canada
795
books chicken cooking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've just created a new section for discussing Nomadic Housing.

I'm really interested in temporary dwellings like yurts, knock up knock down structures, tents, house on wheel, caravans, shepherds huts, all sorts of structures that are pertinent to the nomadic lifestyle. I thought this might be a fun topic to explore.

What do you think about when you think Nomadic Housing?
 
Joseph Lofthouse
gardener
Posts: 2573
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
499
bee chicken food preservation fungi greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
R Ranson wrote:What do you think about when you think Nomadic Housing?


I remember the sheep camps that came through town when I was a kid... They resembled covered wagons, except that the sides were metal instead of fabric, and they had modern rubber tires. I ate a meal in one when I was a child. We called the shepherds that used them the Basque Gypsies.

My mobile housing has often been a vehicle... A member of my family often used to say that I lived in my truck. Perhaps I did. I certainly carried enough food, water, clothes, and bedding in it at all times that I could spend the night wherever I happened to be without worrying about my safety or well being. My family has most often used camper shells that slip into the back of a pickup.

 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9741
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
181
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm also interested in this because in so many locations, permanent dwellings are taxed but temporary or movable ones are not. Eventually I would like the possibility of having more people live on our land, but by deed restriction we can't build a permanent dwelling smaller than 750 sq feet. And we're not supposed to live in mobile homes or RVs either, but yurts and tiny houses on trailers are not "mobile homes" or "RVs" (and it's not like any of the neighbors would actually care anyway).

It would be keen if there were groups of permies traveling the country stopping in to stay for awhile on other permies' land!

 
Roberto pokachinni
pollinator
Posts: 1332
Location: Fraser Headwaters, B.C., Zone3, Latitude 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
93
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi hugelkultur solar trees woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
a farmer I know in my area has at least three old truck campers that he has spread out on his property for Wwoofers to have a home of their own while working at his place. I have one of my own. It's not an RV, or mobile home. It's a great option, particularly if the old camper still has enough integrity to put on a truck and move somewhere else on the land. I lived in my camper van, or my tent, or under a tarp for years, and have a school bus on my land, and an old motorhome. I'm well on my way to being a village without people. My land, apart from my occasional visits like tomorrow, is presently unoccupied, except by critters like voles.

I like the idea of the permie gypsy that Tyler brings up.

There is an actual Gypsy culture that is authentic, and some of them take offence to the appropriation of their name toward the generic nomadic nature that we refer to it as. Just thought I'd mention that.


 
Frank Lee
Posts: 19
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As a retired hobo, when I think of nomadic living I think of what I can carry on my back. I have traveled all over the United States with an entire kitchen, including food and bedroom in a day pack.
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6783
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
263
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For me, it's a van full of tools, with a bed. I've spent more than a decade all together, living in vehicles at demolition projects and other job sites. Vans beat cars, trucks and tents, in every way that I know of.
 
Mick Fisch
Posts: 235
8
bee duck fish food preservation forest garden fungi trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I always liked the idea of a caravan. I love the idea of a yurt, although my wife is prejudiced against round structures (no flat wall to put things against bugs her). Not sure how I would like the reality. When I was single, living out of a car wasn't too tough. I think it would be now, being older and less flexible. The biggest difference though in my thinking now is kids.

I think a single person or even a couple might be fine, but I wonder how fun it would be with several kids. I may find out when I retire. My wife and I are looking at selling out and heading out to Spokane or Couer de Len and starting a new permaculture homestead because it looks like all our kids are probably going to end up out west. Still have four kids at home, although that will probably be whittled down some maybe in two years.
 
Hans Quistorff
pollinator
Posts: 781
Location: Longbranch, WA
44
chicken goat rabbit solar tiny house wofati
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This was the original plan for the group on my extra 5 acres. They would build tiny homes on wheels. some would move them to Arizona in the winter. During the 1960's we had our VW vans and busses which we could live in while we were back and forth between here and Glen county California.
If You are not subscribed and want ideas tinyhousenewsletter
 
Mick Fisch
Posts: 235
8
bee duck fish food preservation forest garden fungi trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When I was growing up in southcentral Alaska in the 70's there were quite a few families, some with lots of kids, living in school buses in the area. They heated them with woodstoves.

I've suggested this to my wife but she isn't really sold. Whatever you do to them, most of them look like someone tried to convert a schoolbus.

They do have a couple of great advantages. Old ones can be price fairly reasonably and they have lots of floor space.

Gas mileage isn't that good though.
 
Parker Free
Posts: 22
Location: Olympia, WA
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is a great topic.
I am currently working hard to finish up my own tiny home, on the back of my one-ton flatbed truck. It even has a name, Oliver's Nest. Every unusual home should have a name, imho.

Where I live, you don't ever see nomadic people. Tiny homes are our version, I guess. Here in the Pacific northwest, they are getting more common, our way of expressing a desire for the nomadic lifestyle, I'm sure.

I have 20 acres of land over in Eastern Washington state that I'd like to see other people be able to enjoy, probably mostly in the summer months as it's in a mountainous and very snowy region. I'll be spending time there myself, when I'm not busy traveling and seeing new places.
 
Linda Listing
Posts: 43
Location: Western PA
urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When I first started my business many moons ago, I sold my yarns and handmade products at about 30 events a year. I bought a VW Eurovan (20 mpg) and a Panther pavilion, single pole, something one person can setup alone. I did shows across America from Phoenix, AZ to Trenton, NJ. Some were reenactments or renaissance fairs, some were art shows, and some Sheep and Wool festivals. As I've gotten older, a way to combine the two, like a gypsy wagon is more appealing. I've seen a few made where displays and living space are combined. Not sure if I can still find a reasonable vehicle to pull such a trailer but maybe someday. Shows change from year to year, online sales have replaced a few shows but nomadic housing is high on my watch and learn list. Pounding stakes into hard ground is not something I want to do each week as I approach 60 years old. Yurts for my use, are not practical as each square foot has a price tag set by the festival. There is simply too much wasted space. So I shall watch this discussion with interest.
image.jpeg
[Thumbnail for image.jpeg]
 
Sharon Carson
Posts: 50
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Before we had kids we were on the road with an old farm 1&1/2ton gmc with a woodstove in the back that we traveled in with all of our belongings and foods as well as craft show supplies ect . Now I am on 5 acres welcoming people to come stay and help in exchange for rent free with food exchange for labor I have a cottage an rv and a pop up camper that I use when I travel . It fits inside a pickup and holds everything you need. the advantages is that it travels like a pickup not a camper and can be left in a spot and put the truck to work. . I spent my early 20s living very lean traveling all over the country .
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6783
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
263
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My friend meets a variety of women at night spots. He's a skilled couch and bed surfer. He somehow manages to work his way from casual acquaintance to house guest, even when there is no personal relationship developing. It can go from a few days, to several weeks.

They should do a reality show on couch surfing. Love them or despise them, people would watch.😀
 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 6410
Location: Left Coast Canada
795
books chicken cooking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love the different ideas on what 'nomadic housing' is. When I first started this thread, I was thinking of structural dwellings that would stay in place for a week or even a few years, but were easily (easy being a relative term of course) moveable from one spot to another.

The diversity of your answers to what nomadic housing is, is very inspiring.

No one's mentioned emergency shelters yet. I think there are some really interesting ideas out there.

Most of the SCA members I know here have their pavilion (big canvas tent thingy) as part of their earthquake kit. If their house falls down, the tent and other camping supplies are stored somewhere easy to dig out. They plan to live with their families in their pavilion which isn't as uncomfortable as it sounds as they have lots of experience using their pavilions in all weather settings.
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6783
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
263
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A vagabond/homeless or lazy bones, squatters camp has sprung up in Victoria. Conditions range from squalid to splendid, depending on who you talk to. Some of the structures use wood scrounged from my demolition project.

My brother knows 2 residents. They hope to set up their own little country. Of course they'd need regular imports of food, clothing, fuel ... from Canada. 😂 Their chief exports seem to be muddy clothing, wet blankets and STDs (super tired dudes)
20160303_173630.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160303_173630.jpg]
20160303_173459.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160303_173459.jpg]
20160303_173402.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160303_173402.jpg]
 
Len Ovens
pollinator
Posts: 1452
Location: Vancouver Island
29
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
nomadic living, I think makes a person belong to the land rather than having land belong to them. I think nomadic means moves at least twice a year. (not by the dictionary, but by practicality)
 
charlotte anthony
pollinator
Posts: 298
17
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
in eugene there has been a lot of interest in making something for the homeless and itinerant farmer types.

one thing has been conestoga hut, please google conestoga hut, eugene oregon to see about this. it is a modern day version of the conestoga wagon, not always on wheels in eugene.

another has been a combination of a yurt and a dome, made from scraps of plywood. the bottom is round like a yurt up to maybe 3 feet and then the top is like a dome. I lived a 10 foot diameter in one of these over a winter and heated it only with a 100 watt light bulb. the coldest it got was 20 degrees and i am fairly tolerant of cold. no one believed me but finally someone said that dome's bounce the heat back into the space. the neat thing is that the pieces are small and therefore can be made from plywood that would normally go to the dump.
 
Sunny Baba
Posts: 69
Location: Northern New Mexico, 7600'elevation, 24" precip
3
chicken goat hugelkultur
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi All... I build Gypsy Wagons, that have solar power, lights , music, pressurized running water, (40 gallon water tank), propane stove, propane radiant heater and double bed, pull out table and small closet, with lots of storage under the bed.... They can be pulled by a 4 cylinder engine... light weight and easy to tow. In fact I am building another one now..... they sell for $10K- $14K sunnybabaspirit@yahoo.com
gardens-020.jpg
[Thumbnail for gardens-020.jpg]
gardens-019.jpg
[Thumbnail for gardens-019.jpg]
gypsy-wagon.jpg
[Thumbnail for gypsy-wagon.jpg]
 
charlotte anthony
pollinator
Posts: 298
17
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
thanks sequoia, these are lovely. maybe a modified dome one one of these days to conserve heat?
 
Reilly Sullivan
Posts: 3
2
forest garden solar tiny house
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can't afford land right now so we went with the nomadic option as well. Couldn't not have a garden so we built a towable greenhouse!



Complete with solar electricity, solar heated water, full kitchen, composting toilet, outdoor shower, and five beds. Also runs on used cooking oil. Free (or rather cheap) travel! Still, wouldn't mind a larger garden.





Check out more photo's and info at LivingEarthEasy.org

Cheers!

-Reilly
 
Sunny Baba
Posts: 69
Location: Northern New Mexico, 7600'elevation, 24" precip
3
chicken goat hugelkultur
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Everybody... Here are a few more gypsy wagon styles that I build... for the wandering romantic, who wants to be at Home, where ever you are.....
GW18-001.jpg
[Thumbnail for GW18-001.jpg]
GW16-001.jpg
[Thumbnail for GW16-001.jpg]
GW6-001.jpg
[Thumbnail for GW6-001.jpg]
 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 6410
Location: Left Coast Canada
795
books chicken cooking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sunny Baba wrote:Hi Everybody... Here are a few more gypsy wagon styles that I build... for the wandering romantic, who wants to be at Home, where ever you are.....


Those are gorgeous! Can you tell us more? What sort of system do they have, how are they heated, is there a kitchen? So many questions. Maybe you need your own thread to share with us how awesome your wagons are.
 
Sunny Baba
Posts: 69
Location: Northern New Mexico, 7600'elevation, 24" precip
3
chicken goat hugelkultur
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello again... just to answer a few questions about the Gypsy Wagons I build... I build them as simple or as complicated as you want to afford... they can be canvas covered, with just a single or double bed and a small closet and a small counter top with sink and a two burner propane cook top..... basically a camping trailer.... these run about $8K OR as complicated as a solid, wooden roof with skylights over the bed and the kitchen.... with 12 volt solar panel mounted on the top... 12vt pressurized running water at the sink,... 30-40 gallons water storage tank, (under the bed) and solar lights, music and computer power, propane stove with oven, 2 way RV fridge..... and closet, plus storage under the bed..... stained glass windows, as well as two fresh air slider windows.... and propane radiant Heater... pull out table top, with seats for two.... these run $14K-$15K..... or they can be anywhere in between these two... with different options installed.... all are light weight, built from the frame up... with a tubular steel framework... some are insulated, some are not... depending on how you want to use them.... all are street legal.... with turn signals, brake lights, running lights, ..... some have electric brakes.. etc. I have lived and traveled in these wagons for 15 years, camped by varies undeveloped Hot Springs, through out the western states..... so they are built from practical long term camping experience..... my contact info; sunnybabaspirit@yahoo.com Here are a few more photos....
GW5-001.jpg
[Thumbnail for GW5-001.jpg]
GW8-001.jpg
[Thumbnail for GW8-001.jpg]
GW14-001.jpg
[Thumbnail for GW14-001.jpg]
 
nancy sutton
gardener
Posts: 659
Location: Federal Way, WA - Western Washington (Zone 8 - temperate maritime)
15
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
IF this isn't appropriate, please move to where it belongs...it's an Indian design school using Bucky's ideas to make cheap, movable shelter.
http://www.chhat.org/
 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 6410
Location: Left Coast Canada
795
books chicken cooking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
airstreem new basecamp tiny house




very slick, kind of space age.
 
Rufus Laggren
Posts: 480
Location: Chicago/San Francisco
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This started as a school bus forum 10 years ago or so. It's been through some changes; also, I haven't visited for a year or so. But the people were good and some of the work was amazing.

https://www.nomadicista.org/
 
Devin Lavign
pollinator
Posts: 491
Location: Pac Northwest
40
books chicken forest garden goat hunting solar trees wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This has been my nomadic housing for awhile, a Glacier tent that is hexagon shaped canvas tent from Reliable Tent and Tipi https://www.reliabletent.com/products-page/specialty-tents/glacier-tent/



It has been a great tent for me, and I am using it on my property these days as temp housing until I can find a trailer to use for longer term temp housing while building a home.
 
Sandrine Coosemans
Posts: 25
Location: Matarranya, Teruel, Spain
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love the towable greenhouse! I would love to go travelling for a while (in 8-10 years or so), the only thing that scares me is the lack of a veggie garden. Wondering what you could grow in a towable greenhouse like that though?
 
Tiffaney Dex
Posts: 12
1
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello to everyone.

My family and I lived in a 29-square-meter yurt for many years. It is possible with children. My sister-in-law swears that you have to raise them thinking differently from the beginning, though, and that her children would protest loudly. My children are not attached to having a wifi signal or anything like that. We have never had a television. So perhaps our children would have been resistant, if they had lived a mainstream lifestyle before. I know other families that have dwelled in yurts, also, but I guess they are different, too, without a television and without a desire for one. My family went from two children to three in our yurt. It was only a year ago, with our children ranging from 6 to 14, that we moved into our home, even if we enjoyed our yurt. During the last year, though, we had realized our oldest son took up a lot more space than previously. He had not quite adapted to his increase in size with puberty and it was awkard in the small kitchen area sometimes, because he still moved as a child, when his size was a man's. We did not move for that,though. We purchased our home because we wanted solid walls and a permanent floor for heating concerns. Mass is not possible in a nomadic dwelling. We had to keep a constant, even if small, fire in the yurt and having my husband chop wood for the rest of our lives is not something I, nor he, wants. Plus, we squatted land when we lived in our yurt. The house we bought came with 3 hectares.

As far as the roundness of yurts, that's actually pretty uplifting, where a box isn't so much.

BTW, the term 'gypsy' is a misnommer that Europeans gave to Roma/Sinti, believing them to be from Egypt. Not all Roma and Sinti appreciate the term.
IMG_2332.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_2332.JPG]
The youngest one in front of our yurt.
IMG_2416.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_2416.JPG]
Our yurt.
 
Len Ovens
pollinator
Posts: 1452
Location: Vancouver Island
29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tiffaney Dex wrote:Hello to everyone.

My family and I lived in a 29-square-meter yurt for many years. It is possible with children.
As far as the roundness of yurts, that's actually pretty uplifting, where a box isn't so much.


That is a nice home. I like the extra "lights" (wind-holes doesn't seem to describe these as well) daylight is something most "old style" (older than 300 or 400 years) houses lack. WIFI is not something a yurt stops one from having, but if it gets children outside... cut the cord
 
Hans Quistorff
pollinator
Posts: 781
Location: Longbranch, WA
44
chicken goat rabbit solar tiny house wofati
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sandrine Coosemans wrote:I love the towable greenhouse! I would love to go travelling for a while (in 8-10 years or so), the only thing that scares me is the lack of a veggie garden. Wondering what you could grow in a towable greenhouse like that though?

Maybe a greenhouse on top of a bus. Access it through the roof escape hatch. Definitely  could have your herb garden and some greens up there. Window boxes on the inside of the windows would suffice for some plants like New Zealand spinach that makes larger leaves with intermittent light.  Maybe add a chicken coop for eggs and use your veggie scraps..
 
permaculture is largely about replacing oil with people. And one tiny ad:
Video of all the permaculture design course and appropriate technology course (about 177 hours)
https://permies.com/wiki/65386/paul-wheaton/digital-market/Video-PDC-ATC-hours-HD
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!