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Never Have I Ever... (DIY/Homestead Edition)

 
master steward
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https://www.facebook.com/attainablesustainable/photos/a.205468889484418.55072.181912421840065/1692882850743007/?type=3&theater

My score is 6: Never had raw egg in pocket (I'm way too clumsy to even try to put them in my pocket. I know I'd break them--so they go straight into a carton!), spun wool (I would love to, though!), used a chainsaw (don't think I ever will, either!), grown a watermelon (they won't grow here), been cut on barbed wire, or milked a goat.

What's your score? :D
 
Mother Tree
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Just gotta get my hands on a maple tree some time...
 
pollinator
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Fun survey! My score is 2

Never had the opportunity to tap a maple tree. And I've never spun wool, though I did make felt with homegrown wool.
 
master pollinator
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If I can substitute "milking a goat" for "Milking a sheep", then I have done everything, and almost annually I might add. Equally, when someone posted Paul Wheaton's Eco Scale, I had heard a lot about it, but never had seen it, so I was shocked when i was an 8 on that scale.

I am not as bad as I thought I guess.
 
Nicole Alderman
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I totally think milking a sheep counts! The only thing I'm milked is myself, and I'm pretty sure expressing breastmilk isn't the same as milking another animal, LOL!!!
 
pollinator
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I got 20 whats a farmer tan
 
Burra Maluca
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pollinator
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23 or 3 whichever way you count it, I've never grown a watermelon it's too cold here, never ridden in a pickup, they are like hens teeth where I grew up (UK) and not much more common here (DK) And never tapped a maple tree, again they don't grow here, I have tried to tap sycamore and birch.
 
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My score is 5. I keep promising myself that I will butcher an animal sometime... I think thats disgusting!
If PJs means pajamas,  I've never wear pajamas, I sleep on short underpants. Brazil is too hot for pajamas.
Some other things on that list are uncommon hier. No sheeps, so no wool, no maple tree... why someone would tap a maple tree? To check if the wood os good?
And hay bale are expensive hier. Only rich people buy them for their expensive horses.
Nice thread!
 
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I got three...never tapped a maple tree and it's really too late in life to try a chain saw...might try walking around with an egg in my pocket today though

...great list!

EDIT...I just thought to add although I've never used a chainsaw, I've used a bucksaw, crosscut saw, carpenters saw...just about every kind of hand saw.....for the longest time we did not have a chainsaw for the family firewood.
 
Burra Maluca
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Sergio Cunha wrote: no maple tree... why someone would tap a maple tree? To check if the wood os good?



Ah, not, not that sort of tap.  'Tap' as in 'torneira', if that's the word you guys use.  It's for getting the sap out of the tree for making maple syrup.

Here's an image I found that helps explain.

 
Sergio Cunha
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Burra Maluca wrote:

Sergio Cunha wrote: no maple tree... why someone would tap a maple tree? To check if the wood os good?



Ah, not, not that sort of tap.  'Tap' as in 'torneira', if that's the word you guys use.  It's for getting the sap out of the tree for making maple syrup.



Lol, now I see.  Yes, "torneira" is the word we use!
 
Travis Johnson
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David Livingston wrote:I got 20 whats a farmer tan



I am pretty sure as a farmer you can check this off, I know I can.

I never wear anything but boots, jeans and a T-shirt, so at the end of the summer I have a terrible farmer's tan. I am part Indian too so I never sunburn, I just "tan up like an Indian", my wife says, so I do not look so much as having a farmers tan when I pull my shirt off, rather I look more like I have a white t shirt on.

I looked for a better picture but could not find one. This one of me was taken early in the summer by the looks, but oh yes, I got the farmers tan covered for sure.

Shirtless-on-a-Rockwall.JPG
[Thumbnail for Shirtless-on-a-Rockwall.JPG]
 
gardener
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I have never:
Had a pocket full of raw egg
Spun wool
Operated a chainsaw (unless you count holding it while running it wide open so that DH could adjust the idle)
Tapped a maple tree
Milked a goat
So my score is 5.
 
pollinator
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My score is 5. Four if learning to fillet fresh-caught fish counts in some way as animal butchery, but I see them as different things.

I have never spun wool, although I would like to, nor have I had occasion to cut open a hay bale or milk anything. But I have the rest covered in spades.

-CK

Edit: Oh, and I have never personally tapped a maple tree, only been there to watch and assist.
 
gardener
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5. Geography effects limits some of these. I cant tap maple syrup, but i buy it. Lol
 
Posts: 130
Location: Northeast Oklahoma, Formerly Zone 6b, Now Officially Zone 7
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Ha! I actually had a raw egg in my pocket a couple of days ago.  Decided to check the hen house (ongoing pest problem so I've taken to carrying my old trapline .22 loaded with birdshot), figured I'd collect eggs while I was there.  Ran out of hand space, put one in each pocket.  Inevitable happened, squish...

So that makes mine a 2.  I had a picture of my hat tan ring, can't seem to find it.  
 
Posts: 80
Location: Mad City, Wisconsin
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Nicole Alderman wrote: What's your score? :D



We kept cows but no goats.
Did not get to milk a goat.

One point.

PS: in my locale, we tapped birch trees for birch sap, just as good as maple (too cold for maples - they freeze up North). So, have done tree tapping and count it as done.

Maple tapping is too narrow of a view; there is more to a tree tapping.
https://www.treehugger.com/green-food/how-tap-birch-sap-and-why-youd-want.html
https://www.uaf.edu/drumbeats/ethnobotany/archives/FNH-00150.pdf


 
Karen Donnachaidh
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Gregory T. Russian, I'd love to hear your "pocket full of raw egg" story.
 
gardener & bricolagier
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1! Never tapped a maple.
The egg in the pocket was the other day in a sweatshirt front pouch pocket. Oh ick... Those silly berks need more calcium.
Rest of it, oh yes.
And I wear a tank top all summer, I have a tank top farmer tan :)
 
Gregory T. Russian
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Karen Donnachaidh wrote:Gregory T. Russian, I'd love to hear your "pocket full of raw egg" story.



Oh, that.... Nothing to it. A hen-boy.

Being a kid, one of my chores was to scout out the eggs around the barn and everywhere else.
I knew of all the little tunnels in hay storage, under the house, firewood stacks, dog house, you call it  ....  where hens hid their eggs.
So I used my cap and (when the cap was full) the pockets to collect the eggs.
I was too busy for round-trips just to get a couple more eggs...
Few might have gotten squashed, don't remember now.

PS: one day I will tell about my being a smoker-boy, a goose-boy, a cow-boy even... saving the stories for some other day
 
Gregory T. Russian
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Gregory T. Russian wrote:

Nicole Alderman wrote: What's your score? :D



We kept cows but no goats.
Did not get to milk a goat.

One point.

PS: in my locale, we tapped birch trees for birch sap, just as good as maple (too cold for maples - they freeze up North). So, have done tree tapping and count it as done.

Maple tapping is too narrow of a view; there is more to a tree tapping.
https://www.treehugger.com/green-food/how-tap-birch-sap-and-why-youd-want.html
https://www.uaf.edu/drumbeats/ethnobotany/archives/FNH-00150.pdf



I stand corrected - I get zero points.

I got to milk a goat on our local petting farm a couple of years ago.
Totally forgot!
The kids would not do it...  
Dad had to show - nothing to it.
Cow milking by hand was harder if I recall. But I started milking when I was twelve-ish, maybe that's why I remember it being hard - hands were really, really tired.
 
garden master
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6 for me. I imagine I could get down to 5 pretty soon if I used my pockets instead of a basket when collecting eggs
 
garden master
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My score is three. Weird. And I've never lived on a farm or homestead. The families' dairies were sold off before I was born.

Never used a chainsaw.
Never buchered an animal... We went to a hog killin though. We wanted our then 3 year old to understand where meat came from. He said, "Look Mom, the pig is broken!" Then he was ready to go play.
Never milked a goat, but I've milked a cow!
 
gardener
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Six. No egg ... I was little when we had chickens and being that careless with the eggs would have had painful consequences for me.

No hay bale opening, no maple tapping, no goat milking, no wool spinning, no slug-touching. (Moved from a place too far north for slugs to a place so drought-prone that they are tiny and rare.)

I counted thermal-weave long underwear in Sorel boots for the PJs-in-boots one; that was standard for night-time outhouse runs at sixty below growing up, but we never got issued any PJs; we just used long johns for sleepware. Some of my sisters did have fancy SILK thermalwear longjohns, but... still not PJs.
 
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