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Almond Trees (Possible in zone 5b ?)

 
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Hi everyone!
I am new to this website but i have a question and i was hoping someone would be able to help me! This summer i am going to be starting my food forest in my backyard and i really really wanted to plant almond trees and for them to be successful. I live in northern Indiana and i don't know if that is possible? Where i am at is considered zone 5b. I heard that almonds tend to like to bloom when it starts to get warm and with Indiana's weather, where it gets kinda warm and then freezes, i don't know if they will be successful or if yall know any tips or tricks i can do to help it be a success? Thank you in advance! Any advice is appreciated!
 
steward
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Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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Howdy Shana, welcome to permies!  Could you tell us a little more about your property? Do you have any microclimates , or areas that might be out of any wind, have more sunlight etc?

I have a couple of peach trees in Denver that always bloom in the spring but then we usually get a spring snow storm. So we only get peaches every few years. It might be worth planting a couple and just seeing if they produce nuts every once in a while?
 
steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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We grow almonds in Zone 5b in northern Utah.

 
pollinator
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Stark Bro's has a Hall's Hardy almond that is supposed to grow in zone 5.  You can read about it in the link.  I purchased a couple but they aren't planted yet.  It's a hybrid between Peach and Almond and is supposed to be hardier than other almonds.

Stark Bro's
 
garden master
Posts: 994
Location: Maine, zone 5
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Very cool Joseph!  Do you know if they're any specific varieties or are they seedlings?
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Greg Martin wrote:Very cool Joseph!  Do you know if they're any specific varieties or are they seedlings?



Seedlings.
 
Greg Martin
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Location: Maine, zone 5
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You don't sell seeds of these by any chance???  (extra question marks representing hope)
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Greg Martin wrote:You don't sell seeds of these by any chance???  (extra question marks representing hope)



Sorry. Not yet.
 
Greg Martin
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That's ok, it's exciting just to hear that they're surviving for you.  Thanks.
 
pollinator
Posts: 285
Location: North Carolina, USA Zone 7b
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I've pined for almond tree for years and every year I google again, where they can grow and I don't want the $30 expense and heartbreak of experimenting - so many other things to plant every year!
Here's one video but if you google "where can you grow almond trees"   you'll find multiple sources saying that they don't like humidity or late frosts.  The arid regions of the middle east and California are cited as the best locations.     Joseph I don't know your climate but I suspect it's less humid than the southeast where I am ?   I haven't been able to get a peach off my tree in 4 years due to late frosts either.   This year I'm going to prune it very small and put a cover on it to see what happens.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Where+Can+You+Grow+Almonds&&view=detail&mid=0A08506538263C00FD1D0A08506538263C00FD1D&&FORM=VDRVRV
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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The genetics keep getting more and more refined. We are able to grow peaches now even into zone 4b. Yay! Bit by bit, decade after decade, we grow trees from seeds, and gradually find combinations that extend the range of our favorite crops a little further north, and a little higher into the mountains. We find varieties that flower a little later in the spring, and avoid the early frosts more reliably.



 
Susan Pruitt
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So Joseph, am I understanding correctly that you've developed your own hybrids over decades?   I'm still skeptical that I can buy an almond tree from Stark Bros and have success in my humid climate.  Some day when I have nothing else to spend my money on I'm going to give it a go :)
 
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My research says Hall's is hardly worth the trouble,as it's reportedly  bitter,with thick hard shells.

Nikita‚Äôs Pride, Oracle, and Titan are varieties that claim  hardiness,late blooming,thin shells and sweet nuts.
I hope this is true, but I've found little in the way of a first person reports.

I'm in zone 6, with lots of humidity, and my  peach tree from the big box always dodges the late frosts.
No diseases either, despite  zero pruning on my part.
It's more like a 15' tall bush than a tree, but no fungal funk from poor air flow.

If I get almonds,I think I will shade the trunk as much as possible, with whitewash or such.
 
Greg Martin
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William, would be interesting to high graft the almonds onto your peach tree.  Folks do that with citrus onto Poncirus to provide greater hardiness and deeper dormancy.  If anyone has cuttings of the hardier varieties mentioned above I would be happy to try it on my peach and Hall's Hardy and report back to the group.  I planted one of the hardy varieties from OGW, but it died for me in zone 5....wished I had tried the grafting then.
 
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