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mending our clothes...do you?  RSS feed

 
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Best "mending" job I've ever seen: I was once visiting my godfather at his office. He was a pipe smoker back then. It was the 70's and, as he started his pipe, a small bit of ash blew out and melted into his polyester blend white shirt. Of course, it left a small hole, singed in black. He looked at me with a twinkle in his eye, and grabbed the white-out! As far as I know, all his white work shirts had this same badge... and my godmother was never the wiser
 
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I do a lot of mending, too. My husband's shirt collars and cuffs often need to be turned, his pants pockets need to be replaced (darned loose coins and keys ) and he's awfully hard on socks. (BTW, I have noticed that hand-knit socks last forever compared to store-bought.) I patched the knees of my kids' jeans and once, early on, I put iron-on decals on circles of patching fabric and appliqued them like polka dots over the random tears a puppy ripped in my toddler's brand-new jeans.
I don't seek out clothes to repair but I mend for two reasons: 1) to save money, especially on expensive or beloved items and 2) to identify with my late mother who had been taught so many of the skills we now think of as "hobbies" and pastimes. People used to come to her to mend burn holes in skirts and replace zippers in parkas and pants. She wouldn't pass on to thrift stores anything unfit to be worn "as is", so her sewing room was so full of mending projects that when her grandchildren messed up during visits, she could find OUR old clothes in the right sizes and quickly mend the item to wear! I can't express the mixture of warm memories and fashion horror I felt at times. LOL!
 
pollinator
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Does anyone on this thread know of a pretty sure-fire way to repair (or prevent from occurring) the cracks that appear at the bending part of a duck boot?  This would be the flexing part just before the toe region that seems to crack long before the boot is worn out.  Shoo-Goo?....Something better?  Thanks!
 
master steward
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John Weiland wrote:Does anyone on this thread know of a pretty sure-fire way to repair (or prevent from occurring) the cracks that appear at the bending part of a duck boot?  This would be the flexing part just before the toe region that seems to crack long before the boot is worn out.  Shoo-Goo?....Something better?  Thanks!



We used to use something called Goop.  It was silicon-based and slightly flexible.  Very good for repairing rubber boots.  I don't know if that's the actual name for it, or just one we made up.

I've been wondering if bicycle puncture repair stuff could help heal rubber boots?
 
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I generally tend to mend the quality clothes I have which I plan to keep long term or that cost me a lot of mulla. I just tend to disregard the cheap synthetic stuff. I don't even buy synthetic clothes anymore. Buy mending is not unpopular nowadays there is some places in the market that do it.
 
r ranson
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This fell into my inbox today thanks to Paul.  How to sew on a button!
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master steward
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It appears that I totally overdo it when I sew on a button, because I go through each hole at like eight or ten times. Also, during those 10 repetitions I usually tie at least three knots. I.e. I go through each hole like three times and then tie a knot in the back; then go through each hole another three times and tie a knot, then go through each hole another two or three times and then tie another knot. That way, if a thread breaks, it'll only unravel to the last knot, and there will still be thread holding the button on
 
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I grew up on a farm as the only son with 3 sisters so never found time to develop sewing skills but learned many other skills. I have a friend and neighbor who is glad to trade my skills for her sewing skills if I have something worth saving (new zipper in a carhart jacket). If sew you might offer to trade mending for help with something you don't know how to do.
 
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The toothpick tip.... how did I ever not know about that?? Thanks!
 
gardener
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Fred King wrote:I grew up on a farm as the only son with 3 sisters so never found time to develop sewing skills but learned many other skills. I have a friend and neighbor who is glad to trade my skills for her sewing skills if I have something worth saving (new zipper in a carhart jacket). If sew you might offer to trade mending for help with something you don't know how to do.



I had moved here and spouse got some nice heavy Carhartt coveralls that had to be shortened. I had no sewing machine able to do so but I bought new bits to redo the zippers. I made a friend that did, but. She had three pairs of slacks that needed hemming for her spouse, and though she sewed for others, those slacks never got done. I suggested one afternoon we trade. So I am at her place hemming those slacks and she's in mortal combat redoing those zippers after shortening the coveralls a few inches. Her spouse came by and recognized the slacks I was working on, and asked. I told him we had decided to trade so things got done... in the end, everyone was happy.
 
Cd Greier
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So I am at her place hemming those slacks and she's in mortal combat redoing those zippers....



What a wonderful arrangement! I think that I would get a lot more done if I could do it with someone. Imagine a neighbourhood work bee and everyone could bring whatever portable chores they wanted....
 
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I accidently ruined my favorite sweater so my wife made me a hat out of it :)
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jim hughes
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I got pie!!!
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Deb Rebel
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I know some here don't like facebook...I go back and forth on it's usefulness.  When I find something like this posted though I am happy to stay connected there....

This was posted by art lover Lena Young...she finds the most interesting work in all mediums and has many folks following her eclectic posts
I thought this quote and accompanying photos would be perfect in this thread....


Antique darning samplers.

In general, the English term ‘darning’ refers to a sewing technique used for repairing holes or worn areas of a fabric. The term darning, however, can also refer to several decorative needlework techniques that use darning stitches (in this context the term used for running stitches or straight stitches). The main types of darning in this context are:

Pattern darning: a type of embroidery that uses parallel rows of darning stitch of different lengths to create geometric designs. Sometimes the term of needleweaving is used for this type of darning ("chicken scratch"). (Textile Research Center, Leiden).




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Judith Browning
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Tom of Holland's work is inspirational!  This makes me wish I had hung on to wool items I've had and let go because of moth holes...lovely work and he teaches classes.

The Visible Mending Programme: making and re-making

The Visible Mending Programme seeks to highlight that the art and craftsmanship of clothes repair is particularly relevant in a world where more and more people voice their dissatisfaction with fashion’s throwaway culture.


Check out this link for his portfolio...I especially love the red cardigan pictured there with lots of small colored mends.
https://tomofholland.com/portfolio/

"My name is Tom van Deijnen and I’m a self-taught textiles practitioner, based in Brighton, UK. I work mostly with wool, and enjoy creating and repairing knitted objects. I like to do things that take forever, as it allows me to gain a deep understanding of material qualities and the traditional techniques I use for making and mending contemporary objects. I’m interested in both sustainability and the rich textile history around wool in the United Kingdom, and as a result I’d like to explore the boundaries of when the life of a woollen garment (and by extension any object) starts and ends. By exploring the motivations I favour not the new and perfect but the old and imperfect, as that allows me to highlight the relationship between garment and wearer. My interest in using traditional techniques for creating and repairing (woollen) textiles means that creating and mending textiles are in constant conversation with each other."








 
master pollinator
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Hi all.

I am going to have to learn to darn, darn it! My much-better-half's mother knits my favourite socks, but now, into our fourth year, the first ones are developing holes in the heels!

I was also forever ripping holes in the ass of my jeans, especially my work pants, and especially when I was feeling good about having lost an inch or two on the waistline. They'd just slip down, innocuously, while I weeded or dug or planted, and then I would squat to retrieve something, or to lift something heavy, and all I would hear is "rrrrrrRRRRRRIIIIIIIPPPPPPPPPppp!"

So yeah, I was also very fond of the sewing machine patch and patching one pair of jeans with pieces of the corpse of the latest pair to die.

-CK
 
Judith Browning
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This had no credit given...I just wanted to share the image as it might be useful as a 'mend' inspiration.

I think it's lovely...the use of colors, stitching, button and button loop...
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Judith Browning
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Sometimes mends are purely functional and develop their own character as time goes by....

Sakabukuro, or sake straining bags, are usually made of cotton which has been saturated with green persimmon tannin, or kaki shibu, which gives the distinctive brown color. This utilitarian textile was used in sake making.

Crude sake, or sake lees, was placed in this bag and pressure was applied to squeeze out and filter the liquid. Repeated use required repeated mending and we see the wonderfully odd stitches applied for this purpose. (explains Sri Threads)


Sakabukuro
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Judith Browning
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Wonderful examples of boro and other mends at this site The Denim Foundry


The ‘Boro’ Patchwork Denim Jacket by Kapital.


Patchwork Sashiko.



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Nicole Alderman
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Not clothing, but yesterday I noticed that somehow--probably due to my kids playing with my knitting needles--there were too holes in my couch. I didn't want the holes to get bigger, and I didn't want a big patch. So, I grabbed three matching colors of thread and rewove the holes. It took over an hour for the three holes, because I had to go over each line at least four times with the thread to make it strong enough, and to have it match the existing--thicker--fibers used on the couch.

All in all, I'm pretty pleased with how they turned out!

Can you find the two mendings? :-D
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Nicole Alderman
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Today I darned one pair of my son's pants, and patched two others (each one only had holes in the right knee, but I patched both sides so it was symmetrical...and as a preventive measure!).

Here he is with his patched pants....and when taking the picture I realized I needed to RE-patch the pair he's wearing!



(Big thanks to Judith, who gifted me felt for fairy making. The burgandy felt matched his pants so well I used some to patch his pants. Thank you so much! ♥♥♥)
 
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I was looking at all the mending, and reminded of when I was young, we were broke, dad ripped his new work shorts badly across the butt, buying new ones was not an option. Mom patched them, needed to quilt the patch down, so she did his initials in zigzag stitching across his butt, nice and big. The guys teased my dad for years. Stuff like "hey, sign this concrete you just poured, sit on it and leave your initials!"

Mom also added length to pants with a ruffle. One of my sisters grew tall, had ruffles on her jeans for years. She is still traumatized. She's a "It must be stylish!" type, and straight leg jeans were in, not ruffles.

I can mend almost anything, did a LOT of it in college to help pay the bills. I have thought for years about taking my treadle sewing machine to farmer's markets etc and doing mending there. The treadle is good advertising. I moved a while back, and one of these days I'll probably arrange it to take my basic electric machine to the local veterans place when they know I'm coming and mend anything anyone needs done.

I'm a dumpster diver, thrift store, recycler type, I bring all kinds of things home to either repair, modify or use the fabric or trim. It's fun, challenging sometimes, but I like that it has a definite end. So many of my projects have no "finished!" point, it gets to me.

And that thought ran amok, I turned it into it's own thread  Upcycling clothes

Oh, Nichole, I can see your mend, but that's only because I've done mends like that  :)  NICE work!!

 
Pearl Sutton
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This pair of camo pants was dumpster find. They fit nice, and were really new, had been worn only a few times before they got involved with a barbed wire fence. They got tossed, I snagged them, and look at the inside, how many patches it took to make them work! Great work pants now though!
 
Judith Browning
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A pair of long lived pants I would be proud to own and wear...


"Farm laborers work pants patched and repatched ca 1800 discovered in a chimney in the UK"

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Pearl Sutton
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Judith Browning wrote:A pair of long lived pants I would be proud to own and wear...


"Farm laborers work pants patched and repatched ca 1800 discovered in a chimney in the UK"


Lovely patch job, and pants that look like they have a spirit of their own! I too, would be happy to have them. I wonder why they were in a chimney. Odd place for pants to end up.
 
Nicole Alderman
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I was watching BBC's Victorian farm, and they were opening back up an old chimney that had been blocked off years and years before. The chimney was full of rubble and other junk, probably done to insulate it before they blocked it off. Perhaps a similar thing happened here: they were blocking off an old chimney and tried to fill it as full as they could, even using old clothes to do so?
 
Judith Browning
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I wonder why they were in a chimney. Odd place for pants to end up.



the post didn't explain but I'm guessing it was to do with blocking the cold...might have had another heat source?

I've left a trail of rags stuffing cracks in houses we've lived in...the oldest was vertical logs with huge gaps...might have been room for whole pairs of pants...it was a cold cold winter :)
 
Pearl Sutton
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Judith Browning wrote:
I've left a trail of rags stuffing cracks in houses we've lived in...the oldest was vertical logs with huge gaps...might have been room for whole pairs of pants...it was a cold cold winter :)


I nailed carpet to the walls of an apartment one winter. I had the warmest place in the complex :)
 
Pearl Sutton
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Ah... Fall... when an old lady's thoughts turn toward her favorite flannel sheets...
That have been in the mending pile all summer.

A handful of white flannel pillowcases, and they are ready to go! This is their second time through the pile, they have had this done before. They are my favorites. There's an effect of some medications and a certain type of pain that the doctors call "bicycling" where the person moves their feet in bed like they are riding a bike. I don't do that anymore, but I do still, when the pain is a certain type, do something with my feet that looks like a cat kneading, and my toenails tear the sheets up.

These are my favorite flannel sheets, with mended feets!  (Which makes me giggle)

 
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I love some of my clothes more than others, and the ones being repaired are by far the ones I enjoy the wearing the most!

Here's the ass-crack I've mended and a couple holes I have darned in one of my well-loved convertible hiking pants!

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