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Ramp cultivation - Allium tricoccum

 
pollinator
Posts: 147
Location: West Virginny and Kentuck
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Ramps are a cultural food in West Virginia.  Community fire stations often stage spring Ramp Feeds as fundraisers.  You can buy bundles of them from trucks parked by the side of the road.

A couple of years ago, I decided to try to introduce them on my Kentucky property.  The bundles usually contain the entire plant, roots and all.  So I stuck some in the moist spots in my woods.  I've had limited success with return plants.  But reading up a bit, I think I've been planting on the wrong side of the hill.  Shade is hard to come by on my east facing slope this early in the season.

I just discovered a WV ramp farmer, Glen Facemire, Jr., and have ordered his book and some seeds.  I look forward to learning more about cultivation.

Does anyone here have experience and advice for me?

ETA Well, I swear I did a search before posting the new thread, but this one popped up only afterwards: https://permies.com/t/10073/Ramp-bulbs-seeds
 
Posts: 235
Location: Richwood, West Virginia
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My ramps are growing under trees in the woods. Apparently they finish before the trees leaf-out. I'm not a big ramp fan, I froze 100 last year and still have 50 left, probably because I forget about them languishing in the bottom of the freezer. A local store has a 'Fresh Ramps' sign year round so I guess they can be refrigerated for 6 weeks after they finish and their cycle renewed, giving perhaps 3 growing seasons compressed into one year.
 
gardener
Posts: 6414
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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hau Ruth, ramps need to be thought of as "spring onions" for success growing them.
Since they are a wild plant, treating the new plants as you would asparagus is a good idea, giving them time to establish and put off babies before you ever harvest any from your bed.
I plant them on the north slope, in the areas that get dappled sun all year long because they are shade loving plants.  
 
master steward
Posts: 3069
Location: West Tennessee
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My wife and I love ramps, they're hard to come by for purchase and we've only had them once or twice. I'm not sure if I already have ramps on my farm, but I really doubt it, so I bought some seeds. While I may not live in the mountains of Tennessee, I do live in the state and I have woods. Today I went out into the woods in several different places to sow the seeds. In some spots I scratched at the surface of the forest floor and placed some seeds into the top quarter inch of crumbly forest soil and covered them, some I placed on the surface of the soil and covered with leaf litter, and some I broadcast onto the leaf litter. I marked a few places with an orange landscape flag so I can keep an eye on them over the next few years. This is my first year on my new farm, and ramps are slow, kind of one of those "set it and forget it" things. According to the seed package, 1-2 years to germinate, and apparently they may take 5-7 years to maturity. There's a couple hundred seeds in the package, and hopefully with good germination and mindful harvesting, the ramps will spread and they'll be all over the place when I'm an old man.
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gardener
Posts: 1837
Location: Olympia, WA - Zone 8a/b
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Has anyone tried growing them in Western WA? I was thinking about adding some to one of my food forests next year. Not sure how they will do here...
 
Posts: 122
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We sold ramps for years.  Would dig them on another persons property and sell them to restaurants.  The chefs would cut off the the bottoms just above the roots and save them for us.  We would replant the root bottoms on our property in the shade and next year would have a plant all leafed out.  They seem to propogate at a rate of about 2-3 per one.  Season is short in NY.  Usually starts April 1 and may last for 5-6 weeks.  Ours never grew as large on our property.  Where we dug them was very rich soil and south facing.  Same plant but the leaves are 30% smaller.  

Originally we bought seeds but they never grew.
 
pollinator
Posts: 206
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
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Ed Waters wrote:We sold ramps for years.  Would dig them on another persons property and sell them to restaurants.  The chefs would cut off the the bottoms just above the roots and save them for us.  We would replant the root bottoms on our property in the shade and next year would have a plant all leafed out.  They seem to propogate at a rate of about 2-3 per one.  Season is short in NY.  Usually starts April 1 and may last for 5-6 weeks.  Ours never grew as large on our property.  Where we dug them was very rich soil and south facing.  Same plant but the leaves are 30% smaller.  

Originally we bought seeds but they never grew.



Ah. Anyone know a good source online to order ramps plants? What's the best time of year to be looking for them with replanting the roots in mind?
 
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